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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Robin Stryker

Introduces a special issue on globalization and the welfare state. Asserts that economic globalization constrains national economic and social policy far more now than…

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5677

Abstract

Introduces a special issue on globalization and the welfare state. Asserts that economic globalization constrains national economic and social policy far more now than ever before, although the level of international trade has not increased that much compared to levels at the beginning of this century. Talks about the political consequences of economic globalization, particularly welfare state retrenchment in the advanced capitalist world. Outlines the papers included in this issue – comparing welfare system changes in Sweden, the UK and the USA; urban bias in state policy‐making in Mexico; and the developing of the Israeli welfare state. Concludes that economic globalization has a limited effect in shaping social welfare policy in advanced capitalist countries; nevertheless, recommends further research into which aspects of economic globalization shape social welfare policy.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 18 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2010

Fred Robins

The purpose of this paper is to contrast the business risks of seeking to hide “questionable” corporate activities with the benefits of achieving high levels of corporate…

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2170

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contrast the business risks of seeking to hide “questionable” corporate activities with the benefits of achieving high levels of corporate transparency.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper summarises three well‐documented cases of corporate malfeasance, simply and sequentially. Each is analysed separately.

Findings

The paper finds, in each case, that once the concealed “truth” comes out, the companies are in a much worse position than if they had come clean when initially challenged. The generalised finding is that once pressures mount, what is intentionally concealed tends to become exposed, with unanticipated and powerful negative consequences.

Practical implications

To minimise business risk, managers are well advised to refrain from doing things behind a veil of secrecy and, instead, opt for greater transparency. Since what is hidden seldom remains hidden, a “policy” of corporate transparency is often in their interest. The lesson is that when under public pressure, for whatever reason, facts, risks and relationships will out.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates how openness rather than secrecy can reduce business risk and raise ethical standards at the same time.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Fred Robins

This paper aims to explore the general question: Is corporate social responsibility (CSR) a business duty, as many contend, or really just a benign delusion?

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7857

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the general question: Is corporate social responsibility (CSR) a business duty, as many contend, or really just a benign delusion?

Design/methodology/approach

To provide an answer to the question the CSR literature is examined from both theoretical and practical perspectives. This paper offers a broad general review and practical assessment of contemporary thinking about CSR. It investigates three precise questions. These are: who pays for CSR, who makes decisions about CSR, and what are the long‐term, potential implications of CSR?

Findings

The three most relevant theoretical frameworks are each found wanting. In particular, none offers managers clear operational guidance. So, although CSR is recognised as morally attractive, it is judged unhelpful to force it on business through regulatory or legislative means. From the questions posed it is revealed that answers to the first two questions are quite clear. The answer to the third is conjecture. The paper finds that none of these questions has yet received adequate attention. The paper offers three main findings: that CSR has costs which may go unrecognised; that it draws managers into decisions which may lie outside their competence; and, if it were widely adopted on a major scale, CSR would have implications for government and civil society which we have scarcely begun to think about.

Practical implications

At the same time, the proven capacity of business to contribute to society through discretionary expenditure is huge. The paper therefore concludes that it is sensible to encourage business to do more. It follows that CSR should be popularised but not imposed.

Originality/value

The paper provides useful information on CSR as a business duty.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Fred Robins

Illustrates marketplace practice in some of the dynamic, development‐oriented economies of East Asia. Argues that Western businesses engaging in the region for the first…

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10710

Abstract

Illustrates marketplace practice in some of the dynamic, development‐oriented economies of East Asia. Argues that Western businesses engaging in the region for the first time do not always recognize the major impact which the industrial development policies of non‐Western governments have on their domestic markets and local marketing practice. Consequently, marketing’s key activities and day‐to‐day priorities can be very different in a “managed” economy.

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Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Fred Robins

This paper aims to offer an Australian perspective on the recent crisis of confidence in corporate governance and its legislative and regulatory aftermath. It is

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9820

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to offer an Australian perspective on the recent crisis of confidence in corporate governance and its legislative and regulatory aftermath. It is informative because Australia's experience is directly comparable with that of the USA but its professional and regulatory traditions are much less prescriptive.

Design/methodology/approach

The author dissects the corporate scandal of recent years and analyses the several issues which have arisen. Problem elements, once identified, are evaluated separately, followed by an examination of the responses in each country. The main value of the paper lies in the separation and categorisation of these issues. For clarity, the author groups them as technical, political and cultural and uses these three labels to distinguish between problems which are the responsibility of the accounting profession, the responsibility of regulatory agencies, and those faced by managers individually. There is brief mention of some other groups, like suppliers of professional business services, who have also fallen under critical scrutiny. At the same time, other groups associated with contemporary financial scandal are omitted for lack of space.

Findings

The paper includes some observed contrasts between the consequences of scandal in the two jurisdictions and ends with a number of personal judgements.

Originality/value

It is hoped that the judgements made in this paper may offer food for thought and some guidance for those seeking to advance best practice in this important but delicate area.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Fred Robins

This paper is about the marketing of the next generation of mobile phones. It begins with comments on the state of the telecom industry and draws attention to elements of…

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10273

Abstract

This paper is about the marketing of the next generation of mobile phones. It begins with comments on the state of the telecom industry and draws attention to elements of technological and product convergence, highlighting the point that while industry convergence on digital technology is a fact, today’s mobile telephony marketplace is nonetheless characterised by three generations of technology and the latest generation, 3G, embraces three related but competing standards. The paper examines 2G, 2 and a half G and 3G developments around the world and identifies factors relevant to the marketing of 3G, including recognition of geographical and user diversity and the consequent need for marketers to keep these various user perspectives in mind. There is recognition of the financial pressure on telephone operators and of the sometimes emotional and fickle preferences of telephone users. However, customer desire for personalisation, including personalised 3G services, are important features of the marketplace, as will be the availability of simple, secure payment systems.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2010

Michael B. Goodman

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the future of corporate communication professionals and researchers; to present the findings of the Corporate Communication…

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1593

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the future of corporate communication professionals and researchers; to present the findings of the Corporate Communication International (CCI) Corporate Communication Practices and Trends Study 2009; and to introduce the issues presented in the papers from the CCI Conference on Corporate Communication 2009 published in this special issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a discussion of the future of the corporate communication and the findings of the CCI Corporate Communication Practices and Trends Study 2009.

Findings

The paper implies strategic knowledge of business processes and practice for effective corporate communication.

Research limitations/implications

The paper implies several areas for further research.

Originality/value

The paper articulates complex challenges facing corporate communicators.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Death, The Dead and Popular Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-053-2

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Book part
Publication date: 19 May 2009

David A. Kenny and Stefano Livi

The social relations model (SRM; Kenny, 1994) explicitly proposes that leadership simultaneously operates at three levels of analysis: group, dyad, and individual…

Abstract

The social relations model (SRM; Kenny, 1994) explicitly proposes that leadership simultaneously operates at three levels of analysis: group, dyad, and individual (perceiver and target). With this model, researchers can empirically determine the amount of variance at each level as well as those factors that explain variance at these different levels. This chapter shows how the SRM can be used to address many theoretically important questions in the study of leadership and can be used to advance both the theory of and research in leadership. First, based on analysis of leadership ratings from seven studies, we find that there is substantial agreement (i.e., target variance) about who in the group is the leader and little or no reciprocity in the perceptions of leadership. We then consider correlations of leadership perceptions. In one analysis, we examine the correlations between task-oriented and socioemotional leadership. In another analysis, we examine the effect of gender and gender composition on the perception of leadership. We also explore how self-ratings of leadership differ from member perceptions of leadership. Finally, we discuss how the model can be estimated using conventional software.

Details

Multi-Level Issues in Organizational Behavior and Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-503-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1972

Fred Flower looks at linked courses from the college point of view and warns that they cannot be a panacea for the problems of ROSLA.

Abstract

Fred Flower looks at linked courses from the college point of view and warns that they cannot be a panacea for the problems of ROSLA.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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