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Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2007

Fred R. Blass is an Assistant in Management at Florida State University. He received a Ph.D. in Management from Florida State University, and before joining the faculty at…

Abstract

Fred R. Blass is an Assistant in Management at Florida State University. He received a Ph.D. in Management from Florida State University, and before joining the faculty at Florida State, served on the Department of Management faculty at the United States Air Force Academy. Blass has research interests in power and influence in organizations and organizational socialization. He has published his research in such journals as Human Resource Management and The Leadership Quarterly. Also, he has presented his research at both national and regional professional conferences.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1432-4

Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2007

Robert Zinko, Gerald R. Ferris, Fred R. Blass and Mary Dana Laird

In everyday life, as well as in work organizations, we engage in frequent and quite comfortable discourse about the nature of reputations, and wealso see personal…

Abstract

In everyday life, as well as in work organizations, we engage in frequent and quite comfortable discourse about the nature of reputations, and wealso see personal reputation used as a basis for important human resources decisions (e.g., promotions, terminations, etc.). Unfortunately, despite its recognized importance, there has been very little theory and research on personal reputation in organizations published in the organizational sciences. The present paper attempts to address this need by proposing a conceptualization of personal reputation in organizations. In this conceptualization, reputation is presented as an agreed upon, collective perception by others, and involves behavior calibration derived from social comparisons with referent others that results in a deviation from the behavioral norms in one's environment, as observed and evaluated by others. Implications of this conceptualization are discussed, as are directions for future research.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1432-4

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2008

Gerhard Blickle, Paula B. Schneider, Pamela L. Perrewé, Fred R. Blass and Gerald R. Ferris

The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of protégé self‐presentation by self‐disclosure, modesty, and self‐monitoring in mentoring.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of protégé self‐presentation by self‐disclosure, modesty, and self‐monitoring in mentoring.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used three data sources (i.e. employees, peers, and mentors) and a longitudinal design over a period of two years.

Findings

Employee self‐disclosure and modesty at time 1 predicted an increase in mentoring received and mentoring given at time 2. Further, self‐monitoring moderated the modesty‐mentoring given relationship such that employees high in self‐monitoring had the strongest positive relationship between modesty at time 1 and mentoring given two years later. Also, modesty interacted with self‐monitoring at time 1 to influence the number of mentors involved with employees. That is, the modesty – number of mentors relationship was positive for those high in self‐monitoring, and negative for those low in self‐monitoring.

Research limitations/implications

Employees can exercise influence over the amount and type of mentoring experiences they receive based on the style on interaction they utilize with potential mentors, with specific reference to self‐monitoring and the use of modesty.

Practical implications

It is modesty, and early career employees' ability to present it well, that will lead to positive affect (i.e. liking) and behavior (e.g. benevolence and generosity) by senior managers.

Originality/value

Investigates the role of protégé self‐presentation by self‐disclosure, modesty, and self‐monitoring in mentoring.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 13 November 2002

Gerald R. Ferris, Wayne A. Hochwarter, Ceasar Douglas, Fred R. Blass, Robert W. Kolodinsky and Darren C. Treadway

Social influence processes in organizations involve the demonstration of particular behavioral tactics and strategies by individuals to influence behavioral outcomes…

Abstract

Social influence processes in organizations involve the demonstration of particular behavioral tactics and strategies by individuals to influence behavioral outcomes controlled by others in ways that maximize influencer positive outcomes and minimize negative outcomes. Such processes necessarily draw from research in topic areas labeled impression management, self-presentation, interpersonal influence, and organizational politics. However, few efforts have been made to integrate this work for purposes of assessing our current knowledge base, and identifying gaps and thus areas in need of further investigation. The present paper provides a critical analysis and review of theory and research on social influence processes in the workplace, with particular emphasis on human resources systems, organized according to the What, the Where, the Who, and the How of influence. In the process, we identify neglected areas, including theory-building challenges, as well as key issues in need of empirical investigation.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-973-3

Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Gerald R. Ferris, Laci M. Rogers, Fred R. Blass and Wayne A. Hochwarter

Job‐limiting pain (JLP) is an increasingly relevant topic in organizations. However, research to date has failed to examine the stress‐inducing properties of pain and its…

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Abstract

Purpose

Job‐limiting pain (JLP) is an increasingly relevant topic in organizations. However, research to date has failed to examine the stress‐inducing properties of pain and its effects on job satisfaction and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). To address this gap, the purpose of this paper is to examine the interactive relationship between JLP and political skill (PS) on job satisfaction (Studies 1 and 2) and OCB (Study 2).

Design/methodology/approach

In the first study, data are gathered from 143 employees of a product distribution company in the Southeastern USA. In Study 2, the independent and dependent variables are collected two months apart (and matched) from 237 members of a state agency located in the Southeastern USA, who are participating in developmental exercises.

Findings

PS is supported as a neutralizer of stress brought on by JLP. Job satisfaction and organizational citizenship scores decline as pain increases for those with low levels of PS. Increased JLP has little effect on satisfaction and citizenship for those with high levels of PS.

Research limitations/implications

The data are collected exclusively via a survey; however, tests indicate that multicollinearity does not inflate results.

Practical implications

The research has implications for individuals and managers. Managers can understand and account for the widespread effects of JLP. Individuals can activate PS to neutralize stress.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the interaction between JLP and PS in the work environment. Gaps in several bodies of literature, including stress, organizational behavior, psychology, and the biopsychosocial approach, are addressed.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2007

Abstract

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1432-4

Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Robyn Elizabeth Glade-Wright

The purpose of this paper is to promote narrative inquiry as a legitimate research approach for artists undertaking postgraduate research higher degrees.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to promote narrative inquiry as a legitimate research approach for artists undertaking postgraduate research higher degrees.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper takes the form of a literature review describing practice-led research. It draws heavily on theories of art to support its claims.

Findings

In creative arts postgraduate research degrees, where the thesis is delivered in the form of artifacts and an exegesis, new knowledge and understandings are produced in two fields. In the first of these two fields, new theoretical knowledge detailing the conceptual basis for the creative work may contribute to the understanding of the purpose and nature of art. The second field of new knowledge involves artifacts as they can enlarge knowledge about what the author feel and know through images that illuminate experiences and understandings of life. The development and delivery of these forms of new knowledge occur in an interdependent manner.

Originality/value

The original contribution of this paper is the manner in which artifacts are shown to demonstrate the theoretical knowledge claims articulated in the exegesis Furthermore, this paper highlights the significance and value of new knowledge and the manner in which this knowledge is effectively shared.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Jeffrey C. Kennedy

Selection and training of expatriates emphasizes the importance of respecting and adapting to local cultural norms. However, even when motivated to modify their behavior…

Abstract

Purpose

Selection and training of expatriates emphasizes the importance of respecting and adapting to local cultural norms. However, even when motivated to modify their behavior, expatriates tend to act in ways which transgress host country cultural norms. While such transgressions can harm working relationships between expatriate manager and host country nationals (HCNs), this is not an inevitable outcome. The purpose of this paper is to apply the social psychological construct of forbearance to create a model which considers how transgression severity, responsibility attributions made by the HCN, empathy, and expatriate manager reputation influence HCN forbearance in the face of culturally inappropriate leadership behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper, which proposes forbearance as a process which can reduce dysfunctional outcomes on working relationships resulting from culturally inappropriate behaviors by expatriate managers.

Findings

The author argues that differences between expatriate and host country implicit leadership theories influence HCN attributions for culturally inappropriate leadership behaviors. These attributions, together with expatriate reputation, HCN empathy, and the severity of the cultural transgression, will determine the extent to which HCNs are likely to exercise forbearance.

Research limitations/implications

The paper suggests several important lines of research into the initial establishment of an effective working relationship between expatriate and HCN. Suggestions for further elaboration and testing of the model are also provided.

Practical implications

The model points to important processes (e.g. establishing incoming expatriate’s reputation, managing attributions, and facilitating empathy) which have the potential to reduce difficulties early in the assignment.

Originality/value

Much research into expatriate adjustment focuses on the expatriate. This paper adopts the perspective of the HCN, providing a framework for better understanding perceptual and attributional processes influencing the relationship.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

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