Search results

1 – 10 of 12
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1991

Fred A. Mael

Employee desires for promotions and upward mobility have beenthreatened by recent changes in organisations and workplacedemographics, leading to a call for reassessment of…

Abstract

Employee desires for promotions and upward mobility have been threatened by recent changes in organisations and workplace demographics, leading to a call for reassessment of career goals. However, the Presthus (1978) typology of dispositionally based orientations towards upward mobility proposes a relationship between desire for career upward mobility (DCUM) and positive job/organisational attitudes. Other theorists and researchers have reached the opposite conclusion. The Presthus model was tested and received minimal support. Also, contrary to Presthus, males were not higher in DCUM. Implications for reframing of the research issues and the practice of career development are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Career Management, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6214

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2008

Aron M. Levin, Fred Beasley and Richard L. Gilson

This research examined fans' purchase intentions towards the sponsor of a NASCAR (National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing) event and towards the previous sponsor…

Abstract

This research examined fans' purchase intentions towards the sponsor of a NASCAR (National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing) event and towards the previous sponsor. The study shows that fans are more likely to purchase from the current sponsor and less likely to purchase from the previous sponsor. Fan identification and perceived group norms were significant predictors of purchase intentions towards the current sponsor, but only perceived group norms predicted purchase intentions towards the ex-sponsor. Additionally, perceived group norms partially mediated the relationship between fan identification and purchase intention.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 29 August 2005

Jane M. Howell and Kathleen Boies

This chapter on Mumford and Hunter's chapter “Innovation in Organizations: A Multi-Level Perspective on Creativity” (this volume) describes both its contributions and…

Abstract

This chapter on Mumford and Hunter's chapter “Innovation in Organizations: A Multi-Level Perspective on Creativity” (this volume) describes both its contributions and limitations to the development of a cross-level theory of innovation. To resolve some of the cross-level paradoxes highlighted by Mumford and Hunter, we propose five variables that operate at multiple levels including trust, social identity, mental models, networks, and time, and formulate some new multi-level propositions. Future directions for innovation theory development and research are also discussed.

Details

Multi-Level Issues in Strategy and Methods
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-330-3

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 December 2019

Sanat Kozhakhmet, Sharmila Jayasingam, Nauman Majeed and Samia Jamshed

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effect of perceived investment in employee development (PIED) on knowledge sharing (KS) behavior by examining the mediating…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effect of perceived investment in employee development (PIED) on knowledge sharing (KS) behavior by examining the mediating role of psychological capital and moderating role of organizational identification.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were used to collect data from 340 employees from largest MNCs working in Kazakhstan.

Findings

The results show that psychological capital mediates the relationship between PIED and knowledge sharing behavior (KSB). Moreover, it was found that organizational identification moderates the association between individuals’ psychological capital and their KSB. The mediated moderation analyses supported the hypothesized model.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to a more complete understanding of how investment in employee development may support or build employees’ psychological capital which in turn facilitates KS.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 November 2015

Yee Mun Jessica Leong and Joanna Crossman

The purpose of this paper is to explore the perceptions of new nurses in Singapore of their experiences of role transition and to examine the implications for managers in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the perceptions of new nurses in Singapore of their experiences of role transition and to examine the implications for managers in terms of employee training, development and retention.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study was conducted using a constructivist grounded theory approach. In total 26 novice nurses and five preceptors (n=31) from five different hospitals participated in the study. Data were collected from semi-structured interviews and reflective journal entries and analysed using the constant comparative method.

Findings

The findings revealed that novice nurses remained emotionally and physically challenged when experiencing role transition. Two major constructs appear to play an important part in the transition process; learning how to Fit in and aligning personal with professional and organisational identities. The findings highlight factors that facilitate or impede Fitting in and aligning these identities.

Originality/value

Although the concept of Fitting in and its relation to the attrition of novice nurses has been explored in global studies, that relationship has not yet been theorised as the dynamic alignment of multiple identities. Also, whilst most research around Fitting in, identity and retention has been conducted in western countries, little is known about these issues and their interrelationship in the context of Singapore. The study should inform decision making by healthcare organisations, nurse managers and nursing training institutions with respect to improving the transition experience of novice nurses.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Chieh-Peng Lin and Min-Ling Liu

The purpose of this paper is to apply the self-concept theory and conservation of resources theory to develop a model that explains how both corporate social…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply the self-concept theory and conservation of resources theory to develop a model that explains how both corporate social responsibility (CSR) and ethical leadership influence turnover intention through work engagement and burnout.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of employees from banking industry in Taiwan and the research hypotheses were empirically tested by two-step structural equation modeling (SEM) and regression analysis.

Findings

The empirical findings indicate that CSR and ethical leadership are both related to work engagement positively and burnout negatively. Turnover intention is affected by work engagement negatively and burnout positively. While the relationship between CSR and work engagement is positively moderated by ethical leadership, the relationship between burnout and turnover intention is negatively moderated by self-efficacy.

Research limitations/implications

This study confirms that both CSR and ethical leadership play critical roles for influencing turnover intention through the mediation of work engagement and burnout. The moderating effects of ethical leadership and self-efficacy are also presented in this study.

Practical implications

The authors’ findings bring some suggestions for managers who want to prevent high turnover intention from spreading all over their organization. Specifically, CSR and ethical leadership should be taken into account when managers develop their strategies to reduce turnover intention.

Originality/value

This study analyzes how turnover intention takes shape from ethical perspectives and through which work-related state of mind (such as burnout, work engagement) can turnover intention be eventually affected.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 June 2020

Raviteja Kancharla and Anubha Dadhich

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of ethics training (ET) on workplace behaviors. The study also aims to test the mediating effect of ethical culture…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of ethics training (ET) on workplace behaviors. The study also aims to test the mediating effect of ethical culture (EC), on the relationship between ET and workplace behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental model has been developed to address the problem statement. The success of ET intervention has been measured in terms of workplace behavior, which is evaluated by job satisfaction, employee commitment and intention to stay. The proposed research model is empirically tested by data collected from 175 mid-level managers in 30 Indian construction firms.

Findings

The results obtained from process macro showed partial mediation. Stronger perceptions of ET were associated with stronger perceptions of EC. EC is related to positive workplace behavior.

Research limitations/implications

The partial mediation suggests that there is a need for exploring other potential mediating variables through which ET interventions can succeed. Future research can investigate group-level variables such as team psychological safety, which can potentially explain the complete mediation.

Practical implications

The results suggest that ET interventions can be used to strengthen the EC in the firms. If the ET intervention is designed purely on the compliance orientation, it will impede the opportunities for long-term development. The focus should not be with the intent to observe ethical conduct. It should be more inclusive and value-oriented. Firms need to sensitize employees and train them on how to deal with ethical dilemmas. Employees are inclined to study in the firms exhibiting a strong EC. In the construction sector, where multiple projects are handled by employees with unique and niche skill sets, retainment of employees is very important. The human resource departments need to think of introducing ET interventions not only from the study of compliance adherence but also with the motive of retaining employees.

Originality/value

The ET literature seldom discussed long term benefits related to creating an EC. The study critiques the intent of human resource (HR) departments while designing an ET intervention. The ethics intervention is often designed with an intent to fulfill the compliance requirements. This study contrasts this intention and shows the importance of ET intervention to create the EC in the firm, which not only includes compliance requirements like code of conduct but also has a significant focus on sensitizing employees about ethical dilemmas and grey areas.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 45 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 June 2019

Izabela Szymanska, Anita Blanchard and Kaleigh Kuhns

The purpose of this paper is to focus on efforts of a large department store to increase its business advantage by boosting innovation. The first broad research question…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on efforts of a large department store to increase its business advantage by boosting innovation. The first broad research question of this study investigated how the family and non-family members influence the process of organizational change aimed at greater innovativeness in a successful retail family business. The second research question was how the family enterprise handles the tension between change stemming from innovation and progress and the need for stability continuity tradition and maintenance of family control.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is an in-depth inductive analysis (Glaser and Strauss, 1967) of an important and unique case (Yin, 1994).

Findings

The results of the study indicate that the push toward innovation was initiated by family members and that it was focused largely on creating structural support for the innovation activity keeping this activity tightly under monitoring and control by upper management. The attempts at equipping employees with innovation-relevant decision-making authority or consulting the clients in designing novel projects were absent, while the move to change the organizational culture was measured.

Originality/value

This study makes several contributions to the academic literature. It offers an empirical assessment of the effects of emotional attachment and ownership concentration on innovation management, a phenomenon postulated by Kotlar et al. (2016). These two characteristics pulled innovation-boosting initiative in opposite directions creating a unique dynamics. This research also provides an example of organizational identity that hinders the innovation process in the context of a family business that survived and developed over generations.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Robyn L. Brouer, Chia-Yen (Chad) Chiu and Lei Wang

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between the sub-dimensions of political skill and transformational leadership, arguing that in a Chinese sample…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between the sub-dimensions of political skill and transformational leadership, arguing that in a Chinese sample, social astuteness, networking ability, and interpersonal influence will have a stronger impact than apparent sincerity. Additionally, transformational leadership is argued to mediate the relationship between leader political skill and subordinate job performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a dyadic, cross-sectional design where all data were collected at a single point in time and supervisors were matched to their followers.

Findings

The results support that transformational leadership mediates the relationship between leader political skill and follower performance. Additionally, social astuteness was positively related to leader charisma, individualized consideration, and intellectual stimulation; whereas, interpersonal influence was related to leader charisma and intellectual stimulation. Apparent sincerity was not related to perceptions of transformational leadership.

Practical implications

The findings imply that the authors might be able to design more customized training to reduce the costs of leadership development programs. Specially, in China, focus should be paid to increasing social astuteness and interpersonal influence only.

Originality/value

This study is one of the few to examine the relationship between the sub-dimensions of political skill and transformational leadership. This is especially noteworthy in the context of the Chinese sample employed, as most political skill research has been done in western contexts.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Pinghao Ye, Liqiong Liu and Joseph Tan

This paper aims to address the question of what can significantly impact employees' IB and how employees' IB may be effectively stimulated by investigating key factors…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address the question of what can significantly impact employees' IB and how employees' IB may be effectively stimulated by investigating key factors such as employees' knowledge sharing, innovation passion, absorptive capacity and risk-taking behaviour on workplace innovation. The moderating role of risk-taking behaviour on the link between absorptive capacity and innovation behaviour is also investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the principles of social exchange theory, the study design explores the complex relationship among knowledge sharing, innovation passion, absorptive capacity and risk-taking vis-à-vis employees' innovation behaviour within a unified analysis framework. Methodologically, employees in the information technology industry in China were surveyed via a questionnaire instrument, with a total of 318 valid questionnaires being collected online. Following a reliability and validity test of the questionnaire, the Smart PLS was used to verify the research model.

Findings

Statistically significant results reported were as follows: (1) employees' innovation behaviour is positively impacted by knowledge sharing, innovation passion and absorptive capacity; (2) employees' innovation behaviour is negatively impacted by risk-taking behaviour; (3) knowledge sharing is positively impacted by innovation passion; (4) absorptive capacity is positively impacted by innovation passion; and (5) risk-taking behaviour regulates the relationship between absorptive capacity and innovation behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

Owing to limited research resources, 318 front-line employees were surveyed via an online questionnaire vis-à-vis the sampling method only, specifically taking knowledge sharing, innovation passion, absorptive capacity and risk-taking behaviour as antecedent variables with implications on how employees' innovation behaviour may be stimulated.

Originality/value

The mechanism of augmenting employees' innovation behaviour is chiefly explained from the perspective of innovation passion and risk-taking behaviour, which are conducive towards promoting employees' willingness to improve knowledge sharing and innovation behaviour. The social exchange theory is used as a basis to form an integrated model for the research, contributing to a cumulative theoretical perspective for future work on the impact of innovation passion and risk-taking behaviour on innovation.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

1 – 10 of 12