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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2019

Frans Nel and Lynette Drevin

The purpose of this paper is to report on a study that investigated the information security culture in organisations in South Africa, with the aim of identifying key…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on a study that investigated the information security culture in organisations in South Africa, with the aim of identifying key aspects of the culture. The unique aspects for building an information security culture were examined and presented in the form of an initial framework. These efforts are necessary to address the critical human aspect of information security in organisations where risky cyber behaviour is still experienced.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature was investigated with the focus on the main keywords security culture and information security. The information security culture aspects of different studies were compared and analysed to identify key elements of information security culture after which an initial framework was constructed. An online survey was then conducted in which respondents were asked to assess the importance of the elements and to record possible missing elements/aspects regarding their organisation’s information security culture to construct an enhanced framework.

Findings

A list of 21 unique security culture elements was identified from the literature. These elements/aspects were divided into three groups based on the frequency each was mentioned or discussed in studies. The number of times an element was found was interpreted as an indication of how important that element/aspect is. A further four aspects were added to the enhanced framework based on the results that emerged from the survey.

Originality/value

The value of this research is that an initial framework of information security culture aspects was constructed that can be used to ensure that an organisation incorporates all key aspects in its own information security culture. This framework was further enhanced from the results of the survey. The framework can also assist further studies related to the information security culture in organisations for improved security awareness and safer cyber behaviour of employees.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Nitin Sanghavi

Assesses the benefits and limitations of franchising as a tool for the development of small‐to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs); focuses on the use of franchising in…

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1564

Abstract

Assesses the benefits and limitations of franchising as a tool for the development of small‐to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs); focuses on the use of franchising in transitional economies, with particular reference to central European countries. Reveals that franchising ‐ with its numerous advantages over conventional market entry ‐ has played a significant role in the development of SMEs in the industrialized West and transitional economies in general, but that in central and Eastern Europe the uptake of franchising has been negligible. Identifies that there are reasons, particular to these countries, including ‐ inter alia ‐ political, organisational, cultural, economic and legal, which make the use of franchising unattractive to both foreign and domestic franchisors; outlines the evolution of indigenous franchising in other transitional economies, citing successes in Asia. Summarizes the challenges facing Central European countries in realizing the potential of franchising in the development of SMEs, and suggests further areas for research.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 21 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Richard Beilock, Katherine Wilkinson and Vera Zlateva

Uses experiences in Bulgaria to exemplify market entry and control strategies employed by franchisors in a business environment that is geographically and culturally…

Abstract

Uses experiences in Bulgaria to exemplify market entry and control strategies employed by franchisors in a business environment that is geographically and culturally remote from the West. Carries out interviews in 1996 with Bulgarian franchisors and franchisees to test a number of hypotheses relating to issues including the type of franchisor, system densities, market entry strategies and monitoring tactics. Identifies 17 environmental factors ‐ cultural, organisational, political and legal ‐ which represent possible areas of conflict between the franchisor and franchisee. Establishes that franchisors adapt to a remote business environment in a variety of ways in respect of both market entry and monitoring strategies ; establishes some significant correlations between different types of franchisors and their strategies. Finds that western franchisors and Bulgarian owned firms often place different emphasis on the relative importance of environmental factors. Observes a broad variation in market entry tactics. Recommends that franchisors need to establish criteria to establish risks in remote business environments and devise appropriate strategies prior to entry.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 21 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Yaw A. Debrah and Ian G. Smith

Presents over sixty abstracts summarising the 1999 Employment Research Unit annual conference held at the University of Cardiff. Explores the multiple impacts of…

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10458

Abstract

Presents over sixty abstracts summarising the 1999 Employment Research Unit annual conference held at the University of Cardiff. Explores the multiple impacts of globalization on work and employment in contemporary organizations. Covers the human resource management implications of organizational responses to globalization. Examines the theoretical, methodological, empirical and comparative issues pertaining to competitiveness and the management of human resources, the impact of organisational strategies and international production on the workplace, the organization of labour markets, human resource development, cultural change in organisations, trade union responses, and trans‐national corporations. Cites many case studies showing how globalization has brought a lot of opportunities together with much change both to the employee and the employer. Considers the threats to existing cultures, structures and systems.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Grant Arthur Gochin and Brian H. Kleiner

Looks at the way traditional family units are ceasing to operate and proffers a wider definition for the family, outlining the criteria used by a number of companies to…

Abstract

Looks at the way traditional family units are ceasing to operate and proffers a wider definition for the family, outlining the criteria used by a number of companies to offer family healthcare. Considers the tax implications and the costs and impacts of this extension of care. Gives arguments against this extension but concludes that it may be fair, equitable and economically feasible to extend coverage.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 18 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1998

Brian H. Kleiner

Presents a special issue, enlisting the help of the author’s students and colleagues, focusing on age, sex, colour and disability discrimination in America. Breaks the…

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5277

Abstract

Presents a special issue, enlisting the help of the author’s students and colleagues, focusing on age, sex, colour and disability discrimination in America. Breaks the evidence down into manageable chunks, covering: age discrimination in the workplace; discrimination against African‐Americans; sex discrimination in the workplace; same sex sexual harassment; how to investigate and prove disability discrimination; sexual harassment in the military; when the main US job‐discrimination law applies to small companies; how to investigate and prove racial discrimination; developments concerning race discrimination in the workplace; developments concerning the Equal Pay Act; developments concerning discrimination against workers with HIV or AIDS; developments concerning discrimination based on refusal of family care leave; developments concerning discrimination against gay or lesbian employees; developments concerning discrimination based on colour; how to investigate and prove discrimination concerning based on colour; developments concerning the Equal Pay Act; using statistics in employment discrimination cases; race discrimination in the workplace; developments concerning gender discrimination in the workplace; discrimination in Japanese organizations in America; discrimination in the entertainment industry; discrimination in the utility industry; understanding and effectively managing national origin discrimination; how to investigate and prove hiring discrimination based on colour; and, finally, how to investigate sexual harassment in the workplace.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 17 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2005

Dezhong Liu and Brian H. Kleiner

Historically, it was taken for granted that public services would be delivered by a staff of career civil service employees, working within the structure of centralised…

Abstract

Historically, it was taken for granted that public services would be delivered by a staff of career civil service employees, working within the structure of centralised public agencies budgeted with appropriated funds. Today, none of these are true‐public programmes are more than likely performed by alternative organisations or mechanisms rather than by public agencies (International City Management Association, 1989); and when public agencies are used, they are more likely to be staffed by contingent workers hired through flexible employment mechanisms rather than permanent employees protected by civil service regulations and collective bargaining agreements (Kilbom, 1995).

Details

Management Research News, vol. 28 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Eileen Kwesiga and Myrtle P. Bell

Although organizational socialization is a powerful phenomenon with numerous long lasting effects on employees, many organizations and employees weather the experience…

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1069

Abstract

Although organizational socialization is a powerful phenomenon with numerous long lasting effects on employees, many organizations and employees weather the experience unconsciously, going through the process blindly and unaware of its powerful influences. Though studies have analyzed organizational socialization and the role of newcomers in the process, none have looked at the role of specific socialization tactics and their influence on women’s careers in organization. In this paper we consider the relationship between organizational socialization methods and the advancement of women’s careers in organizations. We develop and discuss a theoretical integrative framework and propositions, and conclude with implications and suggestions for future research to better explain the linkages between organizational socialization tactics and women’s career advancement strategies.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 23 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Brian H. Kleiner

Devotes the entire journal issue to managing human behaviour in US industries, with examples drawn from the airline industry, trading industry, publishing industry, metal…

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12967

Abstract

Devotes the entire journal issue to managing human behaviour in US industries, with examples drawn from the airline industry, trading industry, publishing industry, metal products industry, motor vehicle and parts industry, information technology industry, food industry, the airline industry in a turbulent environment, the automotive sales industry, and specialist retailing industry. Outlines the main features of each industry and the environment in which it is operating. Provides examples, insights and quotes from Chief Executive Officers, managers and employees on their organization’s recipe for success. Mentions the effect technology has had in some industries. Talks about skilled and semi‐skilled workers, worker empowerment and the formation of teams. Addresses also the issue of change and the training that is required to deal with it in different industry sectors. Discusses remuneration packages and incentives offered to motivate employees. Notes the importance of customers in the face of increased competition. Extracts from each industry sector the various human resource practices that companies employ to manage their employees effectively ‐ revealing that there is a wide diversity in approach and what is right for one industry sector would not work in another. Offers some advice for managers, but, overall, fails to summarize what constitutes effective means of managing human behaviour.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 22 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Chanthika Pornpitakpan

This experiment investigates the effect of cultural adaptation by American business people on their trustworthiness as perceived by Chinese Indonesians. The sample…

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1597

Abstract

This experiment investigates the effect of cultural adaptation by American business people on their trustworthiness as perceived by Chinese Indonesians. The sample consists of 140 Indonesian professionals born and raised in Indonesia, who read one of the four stories that differ in degrees of Americans’ cultural adaptation: none, moderate, high using English, and high using the native (i.e., Indonesian) language. The results show that there is no difference among the four adaptation levels on disconfirmation of the adaptor’s stereo types. The high adaptation using English condition is perceived to be more situationally caused than is the high adaptation using the native language condition, which in turn is perceived to be more situationally caused than is the moderate adaptation condition, and the high adaptation using English condition is perceived to be more situationally caused than is the no adaptation condition. The high adaptation using the native language and the high adaptation using English conditions are perceived to be trustworthier than is the moderate adaptation condition, which in turn is perceived to be trustworthier than is the no adaptation condition; these results contradict the findings of some earlier studies but are consistent with those in the cases of Americans adapting to Thais and Japanese in Pornpitakpan (1998), to People’s Republic of China Chinese in Pornpitakpan (2002b), and to Malaysians in Pornpitakpan (2004). Marketing implications are discussed.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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