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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Richard G. Brody and Frank S. Perri

The purpose of this paper is to explore the issue of suicide, a violent act against one’s self, as it relates to white- and red-collar crimes. White-collar crime can be…

1239

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the issue of suicide, a violent act against one’s self, as it relates to white- and red-collar crimes. White-collar crime can be described as nonviolent crime committed for financial gain. Red-collar crime describes a situation where a white-collar criminal commits an act of violence, often murder, to silence someone who is in a position to report a fraud they have perpetrated. Previous research has not addressed the issue of suicide, as it relates to white- and red-collar crime.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is conceptual, focusing on the historical underpinnings of white- and red-collar crime and reviewing the evolution of white-collar criminals. Sources of information consisted of published news media, scholarly articles and articles retrieved from the web.

Findings

A suicide may be linked, directly or indirectly, to a financial crime. Law enforcement must be careful not to jump to conclusions, as there is a possibility that a staged suicide has occurred.

Originality/value

Law enforcement individuals may want to consider an additional motive when investigating a suicide, especially when the victim has some type of connection to a known fraud. This type of connection may not be readily apparent and may require a new approach on the part of a law enforcement investigation.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 January 2011

Frank S. Perri and Richard G. Brody

The purpose of this paper is to understand workplace violence risk factors linked to fraud detection and safeguards professionals can implement to reduce such risk.

1800

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand workplace violence risk factors linked to fraud detection and safeguards professionals can implement to reduce such risk.

Design/methodology/approach

Sources of information consisted of published news media, scholarly articles, and articles retrieved from the web.

Findings

Findings suggest that there may be an underestimation by anti‐fraud professionals as to the possibility of a white‐collar criminal resorting to violence to prevent his or her fraud schemes from being detected and disclosed.

Practical implications

The paper represents a useful guide for anti‐fraud professionals to incorporate into their practice by considering workplace risk factors and solutions to mitigate such risks.

Originality/value

This paper serves to educate anti‐fraud professionals to recognize workplace violence risk factors, the behavioral traits of violent white‐collar criminals, and the steps they can take to mitigate such risks.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2012

Frank S. Perri and Richard G. Brody

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how a financial fraud practice, known as affinity fraud, relies on building trust with victims based on shared affiliations or…

1079

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how a financial fraud practice, known as affinity fraud, relies on building trust with victims based on shared affiliations or characteristics such as age, race, religion, ethnicity or professional designations, for the purpose of exploiting the trust factor for financial advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

Sources of information consisted of scholarly articles and articles retrieved from the web.

Findings

Findings suggest that these fraud offenders rely on a myriad of persuasion techniques to overcome offender skepticism coupled with victims engaging in a psychological concept known as projection bias to evaluate the credibility of these offenders. These factors create a negative synergy that dilutes the perceived need for due diligence normally required prior to engaging in securities transactions. In addition, these offenders display a predatory quality, debunking the myth that fraud offenders exhibit a homogenous crime group behavioral profile.

Practical implications

Social institutions that include both for profit and not for profit should consider evaluating their interactions with those who share similar characteristics and affiliations that attempt to offer goods or services by considering some of the factors contained within this article that may dilute due diligence protocol.

Originality/value

This paper serves to alert and educate anti‐fraud professionals, law enforcement and policy makers of a predatory fraud practice that targets organizations exploiting the inherent trust that these organizations rely upon.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 October 2012

Frank S. Perri and Richard G. Brody

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how a financial fraud practice, known as affinity fraud, relies on building trust with victims based on shared affiliations or…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how a financial fraud practice, known as affinity fraud, relies on building trust with victims based on shared affiliations or characteristics such as age, race, religion, ethnicity or professional designations, for the purpose of exploiting the trust factor for financial advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

Sources of information consisted of scholarly articles and articles retrieved from the web.

Findings

Findings suggest that these fraud offenders rely on myriad persuasion techniques to overcome offender skepticism coupled with victims engaging in a psychological concept known as projection bias to evaluate the credibility of these offenders. These factors create a negative synergy that dilutes the perceived need for due diligence normally required prior to engaging in securities transactions. In addition, these offenders display a predatory quality. debunking the myth that fraud offenders exhibit a homogenous crime group behavioral profile.

Practical implications

Social institutions that include both for profit and not for profit should consider evaluating their interactions with those who share similar characteristics and affiliations that attempt to offer goods or services by considering some of the factors contained within this paper that may dilute due diligence protocol.

Originality/value

This paper serves to alert and educate anti‐fraud professionals, law enforcement and policy makers of a predatory fraud practice that targets organizations exploiting the inherent trust upon which these organizations rely.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2011

Frank S. Perri and Richard G. Brody

The purpose of this paper is to expose inefficient regulatory policies and organizational weaknesses at the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) that have contributed…

903

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to expose inefficient regulatory policies and organizational weaknesses at the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) that have contributed to a series of regulatory oversights that have produced some of the largest fraud schemes perpetrated on investors.

Design/methodology/approach

Sources of information consisted of scholarly articles and articles retrieved from the web.

Findings

Findings suggest that although weaknesses that have been exposed at the SEC may not account for any one securities fraud oversight, cumulatively, the weaknesses create negative synergy that increases the probability that a regulatory oversight will occur.

Originality/value

This paper serves as a useful guide to alert and educate securities regulators and enforcement, regardless of the country they may operate in, to examine their own regulatory policies and organizational structures for weakness that may be similar to the SEC.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 January 2011

Frank S. Perri and Richard G. Brody

The purpose of this paper is to recognize that organized crime and terrorism do not always operate independently from each other but, at times, rely on each other to…

5531

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to recognize that organized crime and terrorism do not always operate independently from each other but, at times, rely on each other to create synergistic outcomes and use the same tactics and methods to advance their goals such as the use of fraud.

Design/methodology/approach

Sources of information consisted of scholarly articles and articles retrieved from the web.

Findings

Findings suggest that over time the crime‐terror nexus has increased its collaborative nature and terrorists have adopted the use of fraud schemes that were initially believed to be methods used only by organized crime to finance their organizations and goals.

Originality/value

This paper serves as a useful guide to alert and educate anti‐fraud professionals, law enforcement and policy makers of the nexus between organized crime, terrorism and fraud and that fraud should not be viewed as a peripheral issue in the crime‐terror nexus.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Navigating the Investment Minefield
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-053-0

Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Ramon B. Goings, Travis J. Bristol and Larry J. Walker

There is limited discussion in the teacher education literature about the experiences of pre-service black male teachers generally and the ethnic diversity among black…

Abstract

Purpose

There is limited discussion in the teacher education literature about the experiences of pre-service black male teachers generally and the ethnic diversity among black male pre-service teachers specifically. Thus, this paper aims to explore the experiences of Frank, a black male refugee health education major attending an historically black college and university (HBCU).

Design/methodology/approach

This research study is theoretically guided by selected tenets of Bush and Bush’s (2013) African American male theory and Goodman et al.s (2006) transition framework and uses a qualitative approach to explore Franks transition experiences when coming to America, attending college and engaging in his student teaching experience.

Findings

Frank experienced some difficulty transitioning to America, as a result of not having a strong financial foundation. During his college transition, Frank believed that the HBCU environment was nurturing; however, he encountered numerous ethnocentrically charged hostile confrontations from US-born black students at his university because of his accent. While he had some disagreements with the US education system in terms of discipline, Frank believed that his accent served as an asset during student teaching.

Originality/value

This study adds to the burgeoning research that explores the intersectional identities among pre-service black male teachers. As we argue in this paper, researchers, policymakers and practitioners cannot treat black male teachers as a monolithic group and must contemplate the unique supports needed that can attend to the racial and ethnic needs of black male teachers.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2019

Ryan Scrivens, Tiana Gaudette, Garth Davies and Richard Frank

Purpose – This chapter examines how sentiment analysis and web-crawling technology can be used to conduct large-scale data analyses of extremist content online.

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter examines how sentiment analysis and web-crawling technology can be used to conduct large-scale data analyses of extremist content online.

Methods/approach – The authors describe a customized web-crawler that was developed for the purpose of collecting, classifying, and interpreting extremist content online and on a large scale, followed by an overview of a relatively novel machine learning tool, sentiment analysis, which has sparked the interest of some researchers in the field of terrorism and extremism studies. The authors conclude with a discussion of what they believe is the future applicability of sentiment analysis within the online political violence research domain.

Findings – In order to gain a broader understanding of online extremism, or to improve the means by which researchers and practitioners “search for a needle in a haystack,” the authors recommend that social scientists continue to collaborate with computer scientists, combining sentiment analysis software with other classification tools and research methods, as well as validate sentiment analysis programs and adapt sentiment analysis software to new and evolving radical online spaces.

Originality/value – This chapter provides researchers and practitioners who are faced with new challenges in detecting extremist content online with insights regarding the applicability of a specific set of machine learning techniques and research methods to conduct large-scale data analyses in the field of terrorism and extremism studies.

Details

Methods of Criminology and Criminal Justice Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-865-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

R. Scott Harnsberger

In 1840 Great Britain became the first government to issue an adhesive stamp for the prepayment of postal fees. The United States issued its first stamps in 1847 and by…

Abstract

In 1840 Great Britain became the first government to issue an adhesive stamp for the prepayment of postal fees. The United States issued its first stamps in 1847 and by the mid‐1850s postage stamps were an international phenomenon. The popularity of collecting and studying postage stamps increased accordingly. The term “philatelie” (subsequently anglicized to “philately”) was coined by Frenchman M. Georges Herpin in the 15 November 1864 issue of Collectionneur de Timbres‐Poste, where he combined the Greek words philos (loving, fond) and atelia (free from tax or charge, exempt from payment, franked) and declared “Philately therefore signifies love of everything related to franking.”

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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