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Abstract

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International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2018

Amélie Wuillaume, Amélie Jacquemin and Frank Janssen

The purpose of this paper is to propose a better understanding of how entrepreneurial narrative influences resource acquisition in the fundraising context.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a better understanding of how entrepreneurial narrative influences resource acquisition in the fundraising context.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper combines the literature on emotion as information theory from psychology with behavioral finance findings to develop a conceptual framework with research proposals highlighting the use of narratives in the crowdfunding process.

Findings

The proposition of the paper advocates that entrepreneurial narrative may influence crowdfunders’ attitude and decision to fund a project. It theorizes how emotions in narratives shape the funders’ attitude toward a project and, in turn, their decision to support it. This potential influence is qualified by taking into account the funders’ primary motivations. These motivations affect the degree to which funders rely on affect or cognition to form their attitude and to which they are influenced by more emotional or cognitive narratives.

Originality/value

This framework is the result of an effort to achieve the recognition of emotions in entrepreneurial funding. The paper creates a bridge between the narrative emotional content and the often neglected emotional arousal of funders (considered as traditional investors) to provide a framework for explaining crowdfunders’ decision making. The paper also offers nuances by taking into account the different audiences’ motivations to fund a project.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 June 2021

Vi Dung Ngo, Quang Evansluong, Frank Janssen and Duc Khuong Nguyen

This article aims to clarify the role of social capital and social capital inequality embedded in bank ties in enabling and diversifying new firms' debt use.

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to clarify the role of social capital and social capital inequality embedded in bank ties in enabling and diversifying new firms' debt use.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a quantitative method, using an unbalanced longitudinal dataset covering three years–2011, 2013 and 2015–from a project on small manufacturing enterprises in Vietnam. The sample consists of 513 firm-year observations.

Findings

Network extensity and network mobilisation increase new firms' debt use. Differences in ascribed and attained social statuses (i.e. gender, generation, business association membership and political affiliation) result in social capital inequality between entrepreneurs. Entrepreneurs who are of a younger generation, have higher levels of education and are not members of the Communist Party benefit less from social capital than those who are older, have less education and are party members.

Originality/value

The effects of access to and the use of the social capital embedded in bank ties on new firms' debt use are both studied. The sources of social capital inequality are investigated at the individual level through distinguishing ascribed and attained social statuses and explained by two mechanisms: capital deficit and return deficit. The moderating effects of social capital inequality are also examined.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2019

Yujie Cai

This chapter presents a theoretical framework of the industrial relations (IR) system in China’s coal mining industry, combining the roles of management organizations…

Abstract

This chapter presents a theoretical framework of the industrial relations (IR) system in China’s coal mining industry, combining the roles of management organizations, workers, and trade unions, as well as government agencies. It is one of the first empirical attempts to investigate the relationship between human resource (HR) practices, labor relations, and occupational safety in China’s coal mining industry over the past 60 years, based on the secondary data on coal mining accidents and case studies of two state-owned coal mines in a northern city in Anhui Province, China. The fluctuating occupational safety has been affected by government regulations over different time spans, marked by key political agendas, and by coal mining firms taking concrete measures to respond to these regulations, while exhibiting differing safety performance in state-owned versus township-and-village-owned mines. The field studies compared a safety-oriented to a cost-control-oriented HR and labor relations system, and their influences on safety performance. Coal mining firms and practitioners are advised to shift the traditional personnel management paradigm to a modern HR management system. In addition, although workers are often blamed directly for accidents, it is suggested that workers’ participation and voice in various processes of decision-making and policy implementation, and trade unions’ active involvement in protecting workers from occupational hazards, be encouraged.

Details

Advances in Industrial and Labor Relations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-192-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 August 2010

Frank Ulbrich

The purpose of this paper is to combine translation theory with aspects of socio‐technology and systems theory to study the adoption of shared services in a public‐sector…

1809

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to combine translation theory with aspects of socio‐technology and systems theory to study the adoption of shared services in a public‐sector organization. The paper aims to involve the process of translating the shared‐services idea in concert with people and policies, both in terms of inputs and outputs.

Design/methodology/approach

An interpretive case‐study strategy was applied.

Findings

The mutual impact of process, people, and policies shed light on what influences the adoption of the shared‐services idea. The translation process considers different people and policy aspects, transforming the idea into a specific configuration that reflects the organization's individual conditions.

Research limitations/implications

The in‐depth case study enables better understanding of the adoption of shared services at an organizational level. The paper enriches previous research on the translation of management ideas. It is limited to the extent that it focuses on one particular case, which restricts the possibilities for a wider generalization.

Practical implications

The paper indicates a lack of national policies to embrace the shared‐services idea fully at the studied organization. The paper can aid governments in paving the way for the adoption of management ideas in public‐sector organizations.

Originality/value

The paper extends previous research on the adoption of management ideas and, especially, how the idea of shared services is adopted. It illustrates the translation process, how this process shapes personal and factual outcomes, and what this means for the adoption of the shared services idea at an organizational level.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 May 2016

Sophie Bacq, Frank Janssen and Jill R. Kickul

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of the factors that influence social entrepreneurial ventures’ (SEVs) pursuit of a blended value approach…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of the factors that influence social entrepreneurial ventures’ (SEVs) pursuit of a blended value approach. This paper predicts and examines that the mindset of SEV senior decision-makers leads them to perceive organisational goals differently.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper tests the hypotheses on an original data set of 171 SEVs by means of discriminant analysis.

Findings

The results suggest that social entrepreneurs who display an agency-oriented mindset tend to perceive organisational goals as being single: either social or financial. Conversely, social entrepreneurs who have a stewardship-oriented mindset tend to perceive organisational goals as blending both. The findings also underline that senior decision-makers’ mindsets in terms of governance are far from being uniform in SEVs.

Research limitations/implications

The findings empirically contribute to the argument that agency principles do apply to broader contexts than profit-oriented organisations (Wiseman et al., 2012) and frame SEVs as a promising context that redefines principal-agent relationships. It follows that the expected association between non-economic goals and stewardship put forward in the literature needs to be nuanced: only a blended value approach of social and financial objectives is associated with stewardship, whereas single social goals are best perceived by agency-oriented senior decision-makers. The results are limited to a single survey, using cross-sectional data.

Practical implications

The findings have a bearing on goal setting in social entrepreneurship. The results suggest that practitioners who display a stewardship mindset are more likely to perceive a double bottom line than those displaying an agency mindset.

Originality/value

A novel feature of the model is the incorporation of senior decision-makers’ heterogeneous “governance mindsets” (agency and stewardship) and one of the first empirical tests of blended value in social entrepreneurship.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Paul Jones

553

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Case study
Publication date: 15 November 2019

Nayla Menhem, Liliane Elias Youakim and Aliaa Khoury

This case focuses on social entrepreneurship where social externalities lie behind a commercial activity. It aims to help students understand the ins and outs of social…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

This case focuses on social entrepreneurship where social externalities lie behind a commercial activity. It aims to help students understand the ins and outs of social entrepreneurship concept and justify its application or not to “The Good Thymes”. It leads to an in-depth reflection in the strategic management field but within the framework of a social enterprise. It presents a good foundation to help students applying the strategic tools to this particular context. It aims to help master’s students in the business field to explain the concept of social entrepreneurship by drawing out its elements from the case study, identify and list the components of business development and management, design "The Good Thymes" business model and list its value chain and evaluate the future orientation of a company based on its characteristics.

Case overview/synopsis

Young, ambitious, in love with his native village "Kfarhouna", in Southern Lebanon, Fady Aziz, a branding specialist living in the capital Beirut, proposed in January 2016, in a friendly discussion, to the priest of the monastery of Saint-Georges to rent him an agricultural land. He aims to have a reason, at the end of the week, to go up in his village with his family. Skeptical to the idea, the priest accused him of "not understanding anything about agriculture" and challenged him to propose a valuable agricultural project likely to make him change his mind. M. Fady Aziz fought to meet this challenge which will allow him not only to reinvigorate his abandoned village but also to reconnect with his origins. He obtained the right to exploit a plot of land belonging to the Monastery of St. Georges. He had the idea of planting thyme and transformed his "hobby" into the outset of a long journey where his products crossed the borders, under a purely artisanal brand: "The Good Thymes". Today, M. Aziz is facing a new challenge: Would he be able to fulfill all these orders and remain faithful to the philosophy that led him to invest in his village without impairing the natural and artisanal aspect of his thyme?

Complexity academic level

Master in Business.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 December 2020

Frank van Gool, Joyce Bierbooms, Richard Janssen and Inge Bongers

Flexibility is necessary in a dynamic healthcare environment. However, balancing flexibility and consistency is difficult for healthcare teams, especially when working in…

Abstract

Purpose

Flexibility is necessary in a dynamic healthcare environment. However, balancing flexibility and consistency is difficult for healthcare teams, especially when working in threatening conditions. Methods are needed to help teams create, monitor and maintain flexibility.

Design/methodology/approach

This study evaluates a practice-based program –– the Flexmonitor – which aims to help teams develop and maintain flexibility. Here, realistic evaluation was used to refine the program and define building blocks for future programs.

Findings

The Flexmonitor can be used to monitor implicit criteria and differences in interpretation and beliefs among team members to promote flexibility. It also monitors team behavior and the effects of this behavior on self-defined indicators. Using the Flexmonitor, team members can discuss their beliefs and the definitions and criteria of flexibility. Strikingly, teams were not able to effectively self-manage their flexibility using the Flexmonitor.

Originality/value

This article contributes to our knowledge of self-managing teams, particularly the question of whether team members can take responsibility for team flexibility.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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