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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2008

Dennis A. Pitta, Van R. Wood and Frank J. Franzak

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of and the management of creative individuals in organizations.

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4032

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of and the management of creative individuals in organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper integrates concepts including a range of recently published (1995‐2006) theoretical works in the creative culture, creativity, and innovation literature.

Findings

The paper provides information and action approaches to marketers to aid them in harnessing creative talent within their organizations. Relevant literature shows that communities may be magnets that attract or repel creative individuals. Organizations can engineer themselves to become attractive to creatives. If marketers are skillful in managing creative individuals, the organization may enjoy increased competitiveness.

Research limitations/implications

The theoretical concepts that form the foundation of the paper appear to have a significant application to consumer marketing but have not been tested empirically.

Practical implication

The study explores a global effect that has implications for the nature and scope of marketing orientation performance.

Originality/value

This paper describes the nature and application of creativity and creative culture to marketing. While most literature has concentrated on the city or community level, the paper provides a perspective that may help to nurture the creativity of individuals within an organization. It offers the potential of increasing marketing competitiveness by allowing firms to maximize their creativity as a competitive tool.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 31 October 2008

Van R. Wood, Dennis A. Pitta and Frank J. Franzak

This paper aims to contend that four significant ideas must be comprehended, and their connection and interaction understood if successful marketing to the 4 to 5 billion…

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8971

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contend that four significant ideas must be comprehended, and their connection and interaction understood if successful marketing to the 4 to 5 billion undeserved bottom of the pyramid (BOP) people in the world, by multinational firms is to be realized. These ideas are: the bottom of the pyramid (BOP) market itself; share of the heart versus consumer animosity; the nature and influence of global “umbrella” brands and responsible marketing as a guiding principle for all firms including those focusing on the BOP. Each of these ideas, in and of itself, represents an important dimension in today's global business environment, but taken together they offer a clearer understanding of how companies, particularly multinational companies, can do well (profit) and do good (improve humanity).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper briefly overviews the BOP literature, highlighting those parts most relevant to this work; expands upon the notion of “share of heart” and its twin components consumer affinity and consumer animosity; delineates the nature and impact of global “umbrella” brands in BOP marketing; synopsizes the notion of “responsible marketing” in the BOP context, and proposes a conceptual scheme of how these ideas are connected, how they interact in today's business world, and how they can lead to ongoing business success.

Findings

Mutlinational firms (MNFs) wishing to successfully pursue BOP markets need to blend their understanding of BOP uniqueness, with a clear understanding of the other three concepts, namely share of heart, gobal umbrella brands and responsible marketing. Tapping the potential of the BOP requires not only radicallly lowered priced products but also consumers with higher income. Marketers must address both parts of the problem since acting on either in isolation will not be effective.

Originality/value

Global umbrella brands of the rich world (BrandAmerica, EuroBrand, BrandNippon, etc.) must also play a part in successful BOP marketing. The future of such global umbrella brands lies to a great degree with BOP markets as these markets are still growing, and thus represent and will continue to represent either enormous partners or enormous rivals. MNFs that truly understand the nature, scope and potential of BOP markets, and act in concert to market responsibly to consumers in such markets, will not only garner the needed share of heart related to long‐term success in such markets, but will see their own global umbrella brand continue to thrive and prosper in the ever evolving global market arena.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Dennis A. Pitta and Frank J. Franzak

This paper seeks to explore the relationship between global brands and the emotional connections between consumers and the brand.

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4635

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to explore the relationship between global brands and the emotional connections between consumers and the brand.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper integrates concepts including a range of recently published (1995‐2006) theoretical works in the branding, global branding, and share of heart literature.

Findings

The paper provides information and action approaches to marketers to aid them in managing the emotional ties of global brands to specific market segments. The term “global brand” is used extensively in business but its nature and scope are not understood by all. Global brands are few in number and must satisfy several criteria to be considered truly global. This study explores the requirements for global branding as well as the characteristics and advantages of global brands. Brands may be considered in two dimensions based on their acceptance by consumers. One dimension is the brand's deliverable benefits relevant to its target segment. The other is the type and depth of emotional connection between the consumer and the brand. The article reviews the state of global branding and types of emotional connections. It then postulates a series of actions to build share of heart to aid in taking brands global.

Research limitations/implications

The theoretical concepts that form the foundation of the paper appear to have a significant application to consumer marketing but have not been tested empirically.

Practical implications

The paper explores a global phenomenon that has implications for the nature and scope of market segmentation, product design and promotion.

Originality/value

The paper describes the nature and application of emotional connections to particular brands. While most literature has concentrated on local or national brands, the paper provides a perspective that may help to understand how global brands generate emotional ties to consumers.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Dennis A. Pitta, Frank J. Franzak and Michael W. Little

The value and supply chain is an emerging pathway to marketing's emphasis on customers. It integrates a renewed focus on customer value and the economic and behavioral…

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5045

Abstract

The value and supply chain is an emerging pathway to marketing's emphasis on customers. It integrates a renewed focus on customer value and the economic and behavioral systems of the supply chain. Successful value chains can be developed with emphasis on the four practices that drive a customer orientation. These are: relationships, interactivity, valuing customers over time, and customization. When properly integrated, these practices help to form networks operating as a competitive unit. This paper clarifies the role of value in the value chain, discusses the use of the four major elements in the value chain, and draws implications for marketers.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Dennis Pitta, Frank Franzak and Danielle Fowler

The purpose of this paper is to present a strategic framework to managing online loyalty.

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10480

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a strategic framework to managing online loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper integrates concepts including a range of recently published (1993‐2006) theoretical works in consumer loyalty and ongoing case developments in internet practice.

Findings

Provides information and action approaches to consumer marketers that may increase the success providing want satisfying market offerings. Outlines the costs and benefits of some online customer loyalty building practices. By integrating the literature supporting lifetime customer value with the literature concerned with generating online customer relationships, it provides a pathway to profitable relationships. It also exposes the unintended problems that some online customer loyalty initiatives may create.

Research limitations/implications

The theoretical concepts that form the foundation of the paper appear to have a significant application to consumer marketing but have not been tested empirically.

Practical implications

Uncovers a previously unreported strategy for generating profitable online customer loyalty.

Originality/value

This paper describes the nature and application of customer value tiers to an important marketing process. It offers the potential of increasing marketing success by allowing firms to maximize the value of their scarce service resources by serving profitable customers.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2014

Frank Franzak, Suzanne Makarem and Haeran Jae

The objective of this paper is to develop a better understanding of brand engagement by examining two of its antecedents: design benefits and consumer emotions. The…

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6215

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this paper is to develop a better understanding of brand engagement by examining two of its antecedents: design benefits and consumer emotions. The authors explore the relationship between design and brand engagement and advance a model with emotional responses as mediator.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper integrates a range of theoretical works across design and marketing, including concepts of product design, types of design benefits, brand engagement, and brand communities.

Findings

The authors propose a conceptual model where emotional arousal, which differs across design benefits, mediates the relationship between design benefits and brand engagement. Brand engagement intensifies with emotional arousal as design benefits change from functional, to hedonic, to symbolic.

Research limitations/implications

The conceptual model proposed in this paper can have significant applications in the areas of product design, branding strategies, and brand communications. However, it has not been tested empirically.

Practical implications

The resulting model improves understanding of how marketers can use design to elicit different forms of brand engagement. Implications for marketers include planning brand engagement outcomes early in the product or service development process; involving consumers in that process, clearly communicating the benefits of the design; and supporting venues where brand engagement of different types can be practiced.

Originality/value

Brand engagement is unique brand-related behavior that has received limited attention in the design and marketing literatures. The proposed model offers a look at brand engagement from a design perspective, while emphasizing the role of consumers' emotional responses to design benefits.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Dennis A. Pitta, Frank Franzak and Lea Prevel Katsanis

Looks at recent product development literature which cites the improving but troubling success rates of newly introduced products and recommends integrating customer input…

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1609

Abstract

Looks at recent product development literature which cites the improving but troubling success rates of newly introduced products and recommends integrating customer input as early as possible. Notes that, while companies have adopted cross‐functional product development teams, integrating customer input is uncommon. Suggests that, to increase product success consumers and other external information sources should be part of idea generation and should provide input throughout the rest of the product development process. Highlights several problems that exist which interfere with achieving that integration: many firms are not structured to gather, disseminate and exploit consumer preference data or their surrogates; and it is difficult to identify consumers who could provide ongoing interactive input. Reviews the relevant learning organization literature and relates it to the new product development process. Explores the successful lead user technique used in industrial marketing, describes its important components, and proposes a potentially useful extension ‐ boundary‐spanning product development teams. Describes boundary‐spanning product development teams which are composed of internal cross‐functional members and external members selected from suppliers, retailers and consumers.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 5 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Frank Franzak, Dennis Pitta and Steve Fritsche

With the astounding growth of the Internet, the potential threats to consumer privacy have grown exponentially. Much of the threat lies hidden beneath the view of the…

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6101

Abstract

With the astounding growth of the Internet, the potential threats to consumer privacy have grown exponentially. Much of the threat lies hidden beneath the view of the average consumer. Information technology makes collecting potentially sensitive information automatic and unseen. Indeed, it is the job of marketers to collect salient information to ensure refining products and services to foster consumer satisfaction. The paper explores the issues surrounding the protection of consumer privacy and delineates a means by which the interests of both consumers and the organizations that serve them can be enhanced while protecting consumer privacy.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 18 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Frank Franzak, Mike Little and Dennis Pitta

This paper seeks to describe an innovative practice that has implications for new product developers.

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1703

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to describe an innovative practice that has implications for new product developers.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study describes an approach to new product development for a product that satisfies a need, which is fraught with social stigma. Childhood obesity is growing to epidemic proportions in the USA. The problem is the result of a confluence of factors, including a more sedentary lifestyle and pressures on parents to work and spend less time interacting with their children. For its victims, the problem seems intractable.

Findings

The case demonstrates the need for a comprehensive and systematic approach to product development that provides a workable solution that a target segment will embrace. The product described required careful market segmentation beyond the basic economic analysis of who could afford it. The main issue was to portray the benefits in a way that the target audience would accept.

Research limitations/implications

As in all case studies, the specific conditions found in one organization may not be found more generally in others. Readers are cautioned that the conclusion drawn in the case may have limited applicability.

Practical implications

The case depicts an innovative application of a behaviour modification device to a public health problem. Other organizations may find the technique of value in their own efforts.

Originality/value

The case describes a successful application of a medical device to address the childhood obesity problem. The work necessary to ensure that the PARS product was effective represents a new area of investigation in new product development.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Frank Franzak and Dennis Pitta

The paper aims to track the development of service dominant logic (SDL) applied to brand management and highlights its essential elements. The paper attempts to extend the…

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2519

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to track the development of service dominant logic (SDL) applied to brand management and highlights its essential elements. The paper attempts to extend the application of SDL to a form that makes the consumer part of the development process, a solution dominant approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the literature and suggests how brand managers can use service concepts, based on service‐dominance logic, to develop their new and differentiated products. The key is the relationship that customers develop with products, not the providers of those products, and how technology contributes to these linkages. This view, termed solution dominant, extends service dominant thinking. The paper also elaborates on the events and developments that have moved product development more firmly in the direction of relationships. Finally, it re‐examines some of the techniques that product developers use from a relationship perspective.

Findings

The relationship is the most important element in brand management. Relationships can take many forms based on the partners. While brand managers have traditionally focused on the relationship of the consumer with the brand, other relationships exist and are important. The internet has made it possible for consumer‐to‐consumer relationships to flourish. That presents both a challenge and opportunity for brand managers. Finally, an impending technological change reveals the potential importance of another relationship, consumer to thing (like a software application) which can build a bond, a relationship, between the consumer and a brand. The last logical possibility, thing‐to‐thing relationships already exist and their importance to brand managers is covered.

Practical implications

Service dominant logic and a focus on relationships has already been applied to brand management with success. It helps to refine the practice of branding. Consideration of a solution dominant logic, may help refine the practice further.

Originality/value

While service dominant logic has been applied to brand management, solution dominant logic, in which the consumer is part of the product/service design process has not been.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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