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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2018

Frank R. Burbach, Hannah Sherbersky, Ragni Whitlock, Estelle H. Rapsey, Kim A. Wright and Rachel V. Handley

The purpose of this paper is to describe the University of Exeter Family Interventions (FIs) training programme for the South West region which was commissioned as part of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the University of Exeter Family Interventions (FIs) training programme for the South West region which was commissioned as part of the NHS England Access and Waiting Times standards (A&WTS) initiative for early psychosis. This programme (10 taught days and 6 months of supervised practice) is designed to maximise implementation in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The programme introduces students to a flexible, widely applicable FI approach which integrates cognitive behavioural/psycho-educational and systemic approaches. It refreshes and develops CBT-based psycho-social intervention skills, so that clinicians feel confident to use them in family sessions and integrate these with foundation level family therapy skills. The approach facilitates engagement, and it is designed so that every session is a “mini intervention”. This enables clinicians to offer standard NICE-concordant FI or a briefer intervention if this is sufficient to meet the particular needs of a family.

Findings

This paper provides details of the regional training programme and evaluates the first four training courses delivered to nine early intervention in psychosis teams. It considers how a combination of training a critical mass of staff in each service, ongoing supervision, regional events to maintain skills and motivation to deliver FI, and the national and regional auditing of FI as part of the A&WTS all contribute to clinical implementation.

Originality/value

The unique design of this programme maximises implementation in practice by virtue of its widely applicable integrated FI approach, the focus on ongoing skills development and by embedding it within regional and local service support structures.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Frank R. Burbach and Sarah K. Amani

Mental health service improvement initiatives often involve the setting of targets and monitoring of performance. The purpose of this paper is to describe the application…

Abstract

Purpose

Mental health service improvement initiatives often involve the setting of targets and monitoring of performance. The purpose of this paper is to describe the application of appreciative enquiry (AE), a radically different but complementary approach to quality assurance and improvement, to specialist mental health services across a health region.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study describes a regional quality improvement (QI) project involving 12 early intervention in psychosis (EIP) services in South West England. In total, 40 people were trained in AE interviewing skills and in non-reciprocal peer review visits 59 interviews were conducted involving 103 interviewees including service users, carers, clinicians, managers and commissioners. Immediate verbal feedback was provided and main themes summarised in individual reports to host teams using the following headings: team values, strengths, dreams and development plans. A thematic analysis was conducted on team reports and a project report produced which summarised the stages and results of this regional initiative.

Findings

All participants rated the experience as positive; it enhanced staff motivation and led to service development and improvement.

Research limitations/implications

The experiences of these 12 EIP teams may not necessarily be generalisable to other services/regions but this positive approach to service improvement could be widely applied.

Practical implications

AE is applicable in large-scale QI initiatives.

Originality/value

To the authors knowledge this is the first time that AE has been applied to large-scale mental health service improvement and innovation.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2008

Frank Burbach and Roger Stanbridge

Current national policies present a challenge to the existing mental health workforce as most staff have not been trained to work with people within the context of their…

Abstract

Current national policies present a challenge to the existing mental health workforce as most staff have not been trained to work with people within the context of their social support network. This paper presents two complementary training initiatives designed to enable mental health staff to meet the range of needs of families: (1) an in‐house accredited (one‐year) course that has enabled the successful creation of specialist family intervention in psychosis teams; and (2) a whole‐team trust‐wide training programme (three‐day course) to promote partnership working with families by both community and inpatient teams. Issues that have enabled the successful translation of training to practice are considered.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Frank R. Burbach and Andrew Quarry

A pilot project to develop a practical and clinically useful data capture system is described. The system is designed to collect quality assurance and clinical outcome…

Abstract

A pilot project to develop a practical and clinically useful data capture system is described. The system is designed to collect quality assurance and clinical outcome data on a routine basis to monitor and improve the efficiency and efficacy of the service offered by a multidisciplinary community mental health team. The system follows an “input‐process‐outcome” model. Quality and outcome measures are discussed with particular reference to the literature on simple outcome evaluation measures and the use of global scales.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

Frank R. Burbach

Presents the results of a study which investigated whether the quality of information provided by GP referral letters to a community mental health team (CMHT) was…

1177

Abstract

Presents the results of a study which investigated whether the quality of information provided by GP referral letters to a community mental health team (CMHT) was sufficient to determine an appropriate response and the allocation of professional resources. A random sample of GP referral letters received over a six‐month period was analysed. The presenting problem, diagnosis and the indication of severity of symptoms were rated. Perusal of the CMHT members’ replies to the GPs allowed a rough analysis of the extent of agreement with the GPs’ diagnoses, description of presenting problems and severity of symptoms. Discusses the results of the study with regard to the implications of GP fundholding and the employment of GP‐based counsellors.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Elizabeth Parker

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2017

Stefan Jooss and Ralf Burbach

Although a need for innovative approaches to the strategic management of human resources (HR) has been identified, many firms continue to rely solely on their HR…

Abstract

Purpose

Although a need for innovative approaches to the strategic management of human resources (HR) has been identified, many firms continue to rely solely on their HR information systems instead of adapting to the digital consumer with innovative tools and digital HR management (d-HRM). This research aims to evaluate critically the degree of digital innovation of HR practices in the Irish hotel industry.

Methodology/approach

For this qualitative study, a total of 10 semi-structured interviews were conducted with key personnel at both corporate and property level HR in the two largest Irish hotel groups.

Findings

Findings show an overall lack of technological innovation and most of the principal HR activities are digitalised to a very limited extent. In addition, the perception of the degree of digitalisation varies significantly between the managers in both organisations.

Practical and social implications

In order to attract digital natives and to increase their competitiveness within the sector, Irish hotel corporations will need to invest significantly in innovation within their HR departments to capitalise on the strategic and operational advantages of d-HRM. Thus, a more strategic approach towards HR innovation is needed.

Originality/value

This chapter operationalises the concept of HR innovation in the context of the hotel industry; it analyses the key HR activities in hotel operations with regard to the extent to which they are digitalised; and it develops a model of HR digitalisation that can be applied to the hotel and other industries. This research, therefore, contributes to the existing body of knowledge on HR innovation with a specific focus on the hotel industry.

Details

Electronic HRM in the Smart Era
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-315-9

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 31 October 2015

Guoqing Tang and Caesar R. Jackson

In this chapter, we present our ongoing efforts in developing and sustaining interdisciplinary STEM undergraduate programs at North Carolina A&T State University (NCA&T) …

Abstract

In this chapter, we present our ongoing efforts in developing and sustaining interdisciplinary STEM undergraduate programs at North Carolina A&T State University (NCA&T) – a state-supported HBCU and National Science Foundation (NSF) Historically Black Colleges and Universities Undergraduate Program (HBCU-UP) Institutional Implementation Project grantee. Through three rounds of NSF HBCU-UP implementation grants, a concerted effort has been made in developing interdisciplinary STEM undergraduate research programs in geophysical and environmental science (in round 1), geospatial, computational, and information science (in round 2), and mathematical and computational biology (in round 3) on NCA&T campus. We first present a brief history and background information about the interdisciplinary STEM undergraduate research programs developed and sustained at NCA&T, giving rationales on how these programs had been conceived, and summarizing what have been achieved. Next we give a detailed description on the development of undergraduate research infrastructure including building research facilities through multiple and leveraged funding sources, and engaging a core of committed faculty mentors and research collaborators. We then present, as case studies, some sample interdisciplinary research projects in which STEM undergraduate students were engaged and project outcomes. Successes associated to our endeavor in developing undergraduate research programs as well as challenges and opportunities on implementing and sustaining these efforts are discussed. Finally, we discuss the impact of well-structured undergraduate research training on student success in terms of academic performance, graduation rate and continuing graduate study, and summarize many of the learnings we have gained from implementation and delivery of undergraduate research experiences at HBCUs.

Details

Infusing Undergraduate Research into Historically Black Colleges and Universities Curricula
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-159-0

Keywords

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