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Article

Francis Lee, Gary Tang and Chung-Kin Tsang

The purpose of this study is to examine how people’s perceptions of the importance of financial investment relate to their value orientation, societal perceptions and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine how people’s perceptions of the importance of financial investment relate to their value orientation, societal perceptions and policy attitudes. Tying together insights from theoretical analysis of the financialization of society and Mannheim’s (1972) theory of generation, this study hypothesizes that perceived importance of investment should be less connected to a desire for a wealthy lifestyle and more connected to a critique of social inequality among the young generation. Analysis of survey data (N = 1,020) from Hong Kong, an international financial hub, shows that perceived importance of investment relates positively to consumer materialism, perceptions of social inequality and support for social democratic policies. More importantly, the relationships between the latter variables and perceived importance of investment vary across age groups in ways largely consistent with the expectation. The findings illustrate the changing social significance of financial investment and the reluctant embracement of investment by young people.

Design/methodology/approach

A representative telephone survey (N = 1,020) was conducted and analyzed.

Findings

The analysis shows that perceived importance of investment relates positively to consumer materialism, perceptions of social inequality and support for social democratic policies. More importantly, the relationships between the latter variables and perceived importance of investment vary across age groups in ways largely consistent with the expectation.

Originality/value

The findings illustrate the changing social significance of financial investment and the reluctant embracement of investment by the young generation. It is, to the authors’ knowledge, the first study in Hong Kong addressing people’s attitudes toward investment in relation to the notion of financialization.

Details

Social Transformations in Chinese Societies, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1871-2673

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Article

Kay Whitehead and Kay Morris Matthews

In this article we focus on two women, Catherine Francis (1836‐1916) and Dorothy Dolling (1897‐ 1967), whose lives traversed England, New Zealand and South Australia. At…

Abstract

In this article we focus on two women, Catherine Francis (1836‐1916) and Dorothy Dolling (1897‐ 1967), whose lives traversed England, New Zealand and South Australia. At the beginning of this period the British Empire was expanding and New Zealand and South Australia had much in common. They were white settler societies, that is ‘forms of colonial society which had displaced indigenous peoples from their land’. We have organised the article chronologically so the first section commences with Catherine’s birth in England and early life in South Australia, where she mostly inhabited the world of the young ladies school, a transnational phenomenon. The next section investigates her career in New Zealand from 1878 where she led the Mount Cook Infant’s School in Wellington and became one of the colony’s first renowned women principals. We turn to Dorothy Dolling in the third section, describing her childhood and work as a university student and tutor in New Zealand and England. The final section of our article focuses on the ways in which both women have been represented in the national memories of Australia and New Zealand. In so doing, we show that understandings about nationhood are also transnational, and that writing about Francis and Dolling reflects the shifting relationships between the three countries in the twentieth century.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article

Francis Lee

This article seeks to investigate the individualistic ideas, practices, and student identities that developed in correspondence education in the mid twentieth century. In…

Abstract

This article seeks to investigate the individualistic ideas, practices, and student identities that developed in correspondence education in the mid twentieth century. In doing so a number of questions about the individualistic pedagogy and identities in correspondence education are posed. How was individualism to be achieved? What pedagogic practices were used? Who could students learn from? What was the desired identity of the students? How were the student’s material circumstances understood? In attempting to answer these questions the article aims to increase understanding of the individual pedagogy and the construction of the ‘independent learner’ at work in correspondence education during its golden age.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Executive Burnout
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-285-9

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Book part

Petranka Kelly, Jennifer Lawlor and Michael Mulvey

Purpose: The development of service automation continues to underpin the travel, tourism and hospitality sectors providing benefits for both customers and service…

Abstract

Purpose: The development of service automation continues to underpin the travel, tourism and hospitality sectors providing benefits for both customers and service companies. The purpose of this chapter is to showcase the practice of self-service technology (SST) usage in the contemporary tourism and hospitality sectors and present a conceptual framework of customer SST adoption.

Design/Methodology/Approach: This chapter offers an examination of theory, research and practice in relation to SST usage in tourism, highlighting the benefits and drawbacks arising for both customers and service providers. Since the benefits are achieved only if SSTs gain effective adoption with customers, this chapter focuses on concepts underpinning the study of customer SST adoption. Drawing on SST adoption factors and SST customer roles, a conceptual framework of SST adoption is discussed.

Findings/Practical Implications: This chapter examines the principles and practice underpinning the usage of self-service technologies in the travel, tourism and hospitality sectors, with specific reference to customer SST roles in co-creation. The customer SST roles provide a more detailed and nuanced picture of the customer perspective on SST usage. These nuanced roles are captured in a conceptual framework which seeks to further refine the understanding of customer SST adoption.

Research Implications & Originality/Value: The framework provides a useful foundation for further research with a focus on customer empowerment in SSTs. The future development of service automation will require a balance between the delivery of a personalised and smarter customer experience and technology applications that are unobtrusive and which do not pose any ethical or privacy concerns.

Details

Robots, Artificial Intelligence, and Service Automation in Travel, Tourism and Hospitality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-688-0

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Article

David Kennard and Janine Lees

This paper seeks to grasp the nettle of developing a “checklist” of standards that can be used to accredit a therapeutic community, which are concrete enough to be…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to grasp the nettle of developing a “checklist” of standards that can be used to accredit a therapeutic community, which are concrete enough to be objectively assessed as present to a greater or lesser degree, but at the same time reflect the daily living learning experience of a therapeutic community in a way that practitioners will recognise as a true picture of what they do or try to do.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the development of a set of auditable standards for democratic therapeutic communities, and the results of an initial pilot study. The original 60‐item checklist is attached.

Findings

The Kennard‐Lees Audit Checklist (KLAC) was developed out of an accreditation structure proposed to the ATC by Morris in 1998. This was developed by the present authors into 42 specific items which were posted for comment and suggestions on the ATC website in October 1999. A modified version was then discussed with the Prison Service, as a result of which a number of further items were added, resulting in the 60 items versions that was published on the ATC website in October 2000.

Originality/value

The checklist provides a set of auditable standards acceptable to managers, practitioners and residents of TCs. This early work acts as a measure for how things have changed since 2001.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 33 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

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Article

Moonkyu Lee, In‐Ku Lee and Francis M. Ulgado

Reports the findings of a study that examined the relative impactof various marketing strategies on the performance of mature products ina rapidly developing country…

Abstract

Reports the findings of a study that examined the relative impact of various marketing strategies on the performance of mature products in a rapidly developing country, South Korea, from a contingency theory perspective. The results indicate that the competitive environment of the maturity stage in the product life cycle in Korea can be classified into four distinctive types and that different strategies have different effects on product performance for each type of environment. The results also suggest that generally, vertical integration and product/ service improvement strategies have the most significant influence on the performance of the mature products in Korea. Discusses implications of the results for domestic and international marketers in the country.

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Article

Moonkyu Lee and Francis M. Ulgado

Examines how customers react to service extensions, or the use ofan established company name to enter new service categories or classes.Reports the findings of an…

Abstract

Examines how customers react to service extensions, or the use of an established company name to enter new service categories or classes. Reports the findings of an experiment designed to assess the effectiveness of the extensions. Discusses the managerial implications of the results for service extension strategies in the marketplace.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article

Rupert Lawrence Matthews, Bart L. MacCarthy and Christos Braziotis

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how organisational learning (OL) can occur through process improvement (PI) activities, leading to sustained improvements over…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how organisational learning (OL) can occur through process improvement (PI) activities, leading to sustained improvements over time in the context of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors study PI practices in six engineering-oriented SMEs via interview-based case studies. The authors draw from a range of literature and use an OL conceptual framework informed by Crossan et al.’s (1999) 4I framework as an analytical lens.

Findings

The OL perspective provides new insights to conceptualise the nature of PI as a multi-level practice in SMEs. Effective PI practices within SMEs are shown to be consistent with OL concepts, enabling firms to translate individually identified improvement opportunities into organisational-level changes that result in sustained benefits. A new conceptual model is presented that explains how SMEs can learn through improvement activities. The key role of management support, both operational and strategic, is highlighted. It is necessary for management to provide sufficient PI opportunities to enable and sustain beneficial learning.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on a sample of engineering-oriented SMEs located in the UK. Further case-based, longitudinal, and survey-based research studies with firms of different types will enhance the generalisability of the findings, allowing the confirmation and extension of the new conceptual model.

Practical implications

The findings provide a theoretically underpinned framework for achieving OL in engineering-oriented SMEs through PI activities. The new model highlights the key mechanisms that enable learning from improvement activities. The findings highlight the key role played by management in introducing additional learning opportunities in the form of new business that requires exploratory learning. Without this, the reduction in improvement opportunities reduces the benefits that can be realised from PI.

Originality/value

OL provides a multi-level perspective to understanding how smaller firms are able to undergo systematic improvements and the support required to continually improve.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 37 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Book part

The following is an introductory profile of the fastest growing firms over the three-year period of the study listed by corporate reputation ranking order. The business…

Abstract

The following is an introductory profile of the fastest growing firms over the three-year period of the study listed by corporate reputation ranking order. The business activities in which the firms are engaged are outlined to provide background information for the reader.

Details

Reputation Building, Website Disclosure and the Case of Intellectual Capital
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-506-9

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