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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2020

Marcia Carvalho de Azevedo, Francine Schlosser and Deborah McPhee

To investigate how HRM in an established organization can support employee voice and engage employees to be innovative in their everyday lived experience.

Abstract

Purpose

To investigate how HRM in an established organization can support employee voice and engage employees to be innovative in their everyday lived experience.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on a case study of an innovation event in an organization, where 27 employees were interviewed about the emotional, cognitive and behavioral aspects of their engagement in innovation.

Findings

Findings highlight the importance of continuing HRM's involvement during an entire event process to connect innovation events with everyday work. HRM has a central role in initiatives that intend to support voice and stimulate the engagement of diverse employees in innovation in established firms.

Research limitations/implications

This was a qualitative and cross-sectional case study of one organization and one event offered two years in a row.

Practical implications

In order to promote innovation, HR and senior management should foster an environment that motivates employees and promotes voice behavior (Morrison, 2014). HRM can create multiple methods of engagement, acknowledging the diversity of the workforce profile and its specific needs. HRM has an important role within an innovation strategy; as it can, together with other areas, create, develop and maintain actions that support and recognize innovative ideas and encourage employees to become actively engaged with the inclusion of innovation in their daily work life. Specifically, innovation exercises are an activity with much potential to foster voice and promote engagement towards innovation.

Originality/value

We develop a model proposing relationships between HRM, employee voice, employee engagement, cross-department collaboration and innovation. The study also considers the engagement of a diverse group of employees in an established company context.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2019

Deborah McPhee, Al-Karim Samnani and Francine Schlosser

Workplace injury and death of young persons are important concerns. The purpose of this paper is to focus on the mediating role of safety behaviours underpinning the…

Abstract

Purpose

Workplace injury and death of young persons are important concerns. The purpose of this paper is to focus on the mediating role of safety behaviours underpinning the relationship between perceived safety climate (PSC) and injuries, and the moderating roles of safety-specific transformational leadership (SSTL), general transformational leadership (GTL) and training in influencing the mediation, for young workers.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory, online questionnaire was completed by 367 university students employed in various industries. Data were analysed using moderated mediation.

Findings

Safety behaviours mediated the relationship between PSC and injuries. SSTL moderated the relationship between PSC and safety behaviours, but GTL did not. Training did not positively moderate the relationship between safety behaviour and injuries, yet may still inform us on the training by referent others since safety behaviour mediated the relationship between PSC and injuries when SSTL, GTL and training were high.

Research limitations/implications

A student sample was utilised, but was appropriate in this context as it is representative of the type of workers being studied. Longitudinal data with larger diverse data sets should be incorporated.

Practical implications

Business owners must utilise both forms of leadership to promote a safe workplace. HR and H&S professionals must continue to encourage this promotion.

Social implications

Safety training and leadership are important for policy makers and regulators to reduce workplace injuries for youth workers.

Originality/value

This study is the first to test youth H&S using moderated mediation. Safety specific and general forms of leadership and training are important predictors.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 48 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 2 October 2019

Deborah M. McPhee and Francine Schlosser

In October 2018, the Canadian federal government legalized the use of recreational cannabis with a goal to drastically diminish the black-market and the use of cannabis by…

Abstract

In October 2018, the Canadian federal government legalized the use of recreational cannabis with a goal to drastically diminish the black-market and the use of cannabis by minors. The attraction of talent to the new industry has been recognized as important to long-term industry success, but there exists a paradox in talent attraction. Key talent must first be screened by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Anyone with serious criminal charges in the past may not be cleared to work in the industry, blocking out experienced cannabis talent. Additionally, some potential talent may not be interested in working the legitimized industry although others may welcome the opportunity to work in it. HR managers have a rare opportunity to be trailblazers by establishing the norms for the industry. Their role should be established in the boardroom, but they will have to demonstrate their value through their ability to build talent in an industry made up largely of SMEs. We use a nested model of macro and micro TM perspectives to analyze the context of this industry. At the macro level we investigate how legalization, government regulation, legitimacy, and reputation affect TM within the micro level context. We suggest how HRM strategies related to attraction, development and retention can impact TM. The integration of the macro and micro level context of TM is paramount to the survival of the new legalized cannabis industry.

Details

Managing Talent: A Critical Appreciation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-094-3

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2007

Francine K. Schlosser

The purpose of this paper is to propose that sales managers use mobile technologies in the working environment to communicate and supportively monitor sales person performance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose that sales managers use mobile technologies in the working environment to communicate and supportively monitor sales person performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A model of supervisor monitoring using mobile technologies is conceptualized that specifies the types of behaviours that promote high‐quality working relationships, how mobile technologies increase the likelihood of work‐to‐nonwork role spill‐over that may damage the relationship and why perceptions of supervisor fairness are critical. The paper concludes by presenting strategies for testing hypotheses and for researching mobile technology use by sales managers using qualitative and quantitative methods.

Findings

Mobile technology use, supervisory monitoring, and relationship development co‐exist in the current workplace. This research heightens awareness of how work‐to‐nonwork spillover may influence important outcomes of mobile technology usage. Perceptions of quality supervisor‐employee relationships are important to retaining and motivating employees. As the workforce ages and skilled workers become more scarce, it is expected that this theoretical examination and ensuing future research will be interesting and important to the twenty‐first century manager.

Originality/value

This paper aligns research in the areas of leadership, monitoring and ubiquitous or mobile technologies. Previous leadership researches have questioned whether or not the use of different electronic monitoring tools affects the leader's ability to influence others. However, few researchers have examined performance‐based monitoring using mobile technologies, although mobile technologies make it easier for sales managers to monitor non‐traditional work arrangements (i.e. off‐site or contracted work). Furthermore, past research has been inconsistent in explaining how employees view information‐gathering or monitoring by their managers.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2008

Marjorie Armstrong‐Stassen and Francine Schlosser

This study aims to test a model of the relationships among older workers' propensity to engage in development activities (development orientation), their perceptions of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to test a model of the relationships among older workers' propensity to engage in development activities (development orientation), their perceptions of the development opportunities associated with their job (job development climate), their commitment to their organization, and their intention to remain with their organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Separate questionnaires were completed by 395 individuals aged 50 to 70, who were in their career job and 195 individuals aged 50 to 70 who were employed in a bridge job. Both questionnaires included measures of development orientation, job development climate, affective commitment and intention to remain as well as individual characteristics and organizational characteristics.

Findings

The findings supported the proposed model in that development orientation was positively related to job development climate which, in turn, was positively related to affective commitment and affective commitment was positively related to intention to remain with the organization. There were both similarities and differences in the patterns of relationships for career‐job and bridge‐job respondents.

Research limitations/implications

The question of causality cannot be determined because of the cross‐sectional research design.

Practical implications

To create a supportive development climate and retain older workers, employers need to foster older workers' development orientation and ensure that their work assignments provide opportunities to learn new knowledge and skills.

Orginality/value

There is little empirical research addressing issues related to the development and retention of older workers. No previous studies have investigated both development orientation and job development climate in the context of older workers.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2009

Francine K. Schlosser and Rod B. McNaughton

Extant studies of the market orientation of service firms rarely consider the contribution of individual employees to the realization of this orientation. Existing scales…

Abstract

Purpose

Extant studies of the market orientation of service firms rarely consider the contribution of individual employees to the realization of this orientation. Existing scales that measure market orientation reveal the perceptions of a key informant about the dominant orientation within the firm. These scales do not measure the willingness of employees to act in a market‐oriented way. This paper aims to report the development of a multi‐dimensional scale of individual market‐oriented behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

The scale development process included identification of items from focus groups with employees of a major Canadian financial services firm and the market orientation literature. A pretest with marketing practitioners and academics helped to purify and reduce the number of items. Finally, a sample of North American financial services employees responded to the items in a web‐based questionnaire.

Findings

Confirmatory factor analysis of the responses confirmed the presence of a single latent construct with three dimensions: information acquisition, information sharing and strategic response, measured by 20 items.

Research limitations/implications

Although scale validation included both qualitative and quantitative tests that triangulated the opinions of multiple stakeholders in the service delivery chain, future research must also test the predictive validity of this scale.

Practical implications

Such research is important to increase understanding of how service organizations foster market orientation. The I‐MARKOR augments the organizational scorecard approach with individual level measurement.

Originality/value

The scale provides a method to assess differences between individuals within an organization, enabling empirical research on differences between departments, roles, training and other characteristics that may influence the extent to which an individual performs market‐oriented behaviors.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Marjorie Armstrong‐Stassen, Francine Schlosser and Deborah Zinni

This study aims to employ a resource‐oriented theoretical perspective to examine retirees' desire to return to their former organization.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to employ a resource‐oriented theoretical perspective to examine retirees' desire to return to their former organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a cross‐sectional field study design, data were collected from 243 retirees under 65 years of age who had been retired from a career job less than ten years.

Findings

Regression results indicate that retirees who had experienced financial and pervasive role loss as well as retirees who perceived a higher fit with their former organization and the availability of desired job role options expressed significantly greater interest in returning. Retirees who experienced gains in leaving work as well as gains in their life satisfaction following retirement reported significantly less interest in returning to their former organization.

Research limitations/implications

The cross‐sectional design and self‐report data create a potential for bias. Even though the findings are based on respondents' “interest” in returning to their former organization, it is not known if they actually did return.

Practical implications

Programs should focus on creating an environment that values older workers, and provides them with opportunities such as mentoring other workers.

Social implications

Policy changes are needed to ensure that returning to work following retirement results in resource gains and not resource losses.

Originality/value

This study uses resource theory with a diverse sample of retirees and considers their desire to return to their original employers, thus adding value to human resources and management who wish to retain or re‐engage their own knowledgeable retirees.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Francine Schlosser and Roxanne Zolin

It is ironic that in stressful economic times, when new ideas and positive behaviors could be most valuable, employees may not speak up, leading to reduced employee…

Abstract

Purpose

It is ironic that in stressful economic times, when new ideas and positive behaviors could be most valuable, employees may not speak up, leading to reduced employee participation, less organizational learning, less innovation and less receptiveness to change. The supervisor is the organization's first line of defense against a culture of silence and towards a culture of openness. The purpose of this paper is to ask what helps supervisors to hear prosocial voice and notice defensive silence.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a cross‐sectional field study of 142 supervisors.

Findings

The results indicate that prosocial voice is increased by supervisor tension and trust in employees, while defensive silence is increased by supervisor tension but reduced by unionization of employees and trust in employees. This indicates that, as hypothesized by others, voice and silence are orthogonal and not opposites of the same construct.

Research limitations/implications

The data are measured at one point in time, and further longitudinal study would be helpful to further understand the phenomena.

Practical implications

This research highlights the potential for supervisors in stressful situations to selectively hear voice and silence from employees.

Social implications

This research also has implications for supervisors who work in a unionized environment. Although seemingly counter‐intuitive, there is a value to employee unionization in terms of either reducing the level of actual defensive silence, or at least reducing supervisors’ perceptions of defensive silence.

Originality/value

The paper adds to our knowledge of prosocial voice and defensive silence by testing supervisors’ perceptions of these constructs during difficult times. It provides valuable empirical insights to a literature dominated by conceptual non‐empirical papers. Limited research on silence might reflect how difficult it is to study such an ambiguous and passive construct as silence (often simply viewed as a lack of speech). The paper contributes also to trust literature by identifying its role in increasing supervisor's perceptions of prosocial voice and reducing perceptions of defensive silence.

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Francine Schlosser, Deborah Zinni and Marjorie Armstrong‐Stassen

The purpose of this study is to identify antecedents of intentions to unretire among a group of retirees that included both those who had not returned to the workforce…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify antecedents of intentions to unretire among a group of retirees that included both those who had not returned to the workforce since their retirement and those who had previously unretired.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross‐sectional survey collected data from 460 recent retirees between the ages of 50 and 70.

Findings

Results of hierarchical regression indicated that retirees are more likely to remain retired if they feel financially secure and have a positive retirement experience. Conversely, they are more likely to intend to return to the workforce if they experience financial worries, wish to upgrade their skills or miss aspects of their former jobs.

Practical implications

Aging boomers who anticipate early retirement have created a dwindling labor pool. Simultaneously, the global pension crisis has impacted on the financial decisions of retirees. A trend to abolish mandatory retirement and/or increase mandatory age in various countries provides individuals with more freedom in their retirement decisions. Accordingly, managers must be creative in their HR planning strategies to retain or recruit skilled retirees.

Originality/value

Previous research has addressed retirement as a final stage, however, given simultaneous global demographic changes and economic concerns, this study provides new knowledge regarding the factors that push and pull retirees to participate in the labor market.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 29 July 2009

Francine Schlosser, Deborah M. Zinni and Andrew Templer

Resource constraints in the Canadian publicly funded healthcare system have created a need for more volunteer leaders to effectively manage other volunteers. Self-concept…

Abstract

Resource constraints in the Canadian publicly funded healthcare system have created a need for more volunteer leaders to effectively manage other volunteers. Self-concept theory has been conceptualized and applied within a volunteer context, and the views of healthcare stakeholders, such as volunteers, volunteer leaders, and supervisors, triangulated to form an understanding of the attitudes and behaviors of volunteer leaders. We propose that leaders are differentiated from others by how they view their roles in the organization and their ability to make a difference in these roles. This interpretation can be informed by self-concept theory because each individual's notion of self-concept influences how employees see themselves, how they react to experiences, and how they allow these experiences to shape their motivation. A small case study profiles a volunteer leader self-concept that includes a proactive, learning-oriented attitude, capitalizing on significant prior work experience to fulfill a sense of obligation to the institution and its patients, and demands a high level of respect from paid employees.

Details

Biennial Review of Health Care Management: Meso Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-673-7

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