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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Andrew W. Taylor and Frances M. Hill

Examines the emerging ideology of total quality management andsummarizes its implications for further and higher educationinstitutions (FHEIs). Rather than prescribing a…

Abstract

Examines the emerging ideology of total quality management and summarizes its implications for further and higher education institutions (FHEIs). Rather than prescribing a set of generic implementation steps, it is suggested that there are other, more significant factors to be considered. These factors are related to the context in which the initiative takes place rather than where it should begin. Discusses four necessary issues, namely, the removal of abstraction from the concept of quality in further and higher education, organization‐wide understanding of customers and their perceptions, the importance of assessing the current quality level and the need for strategic quality planning. Also cites classical organizational facets such as structure, culture, human resource management and leadership among the determinants of TQM success. Concentration on these key matters attenuates the importance of the method of implementation. Argues that to disregard these prerequisites for success is to risk long‐term damage to the organization and considerably reduce the likelihood of sustained and self‐generating organizational improvement. Concludes by questioning the real levels of commitment which exist in FHEIs at present.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

Frances M. Hill

One of the main difficulties with the Quality Circle (QC) technique is that, to the uninitiated, it appears attractively simple in concept. This attraction has been…

Abstract

One of the main difficulties with the Quality Circle (QC) technique is that, to the uninitiated, it appears attractively simple in concept. This attraction has been enhanced by the many claims made for it in the management literature. Such claims though, are often based on experiential rather than research evidence. However, a longitudinal study covering the four‐year period 1981‐1984 did indicate that QCs can survive for reasonable periods of time, and with varying degrees of success, outside Japan, providing the organisational environment and circumstances are conducive. The study also showed that the QC technique is not universally applicable; it has real limitations as well. The article aims to examine some of these limitations and to suggest what may be reasonably expected from a QC programme.

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International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1991

Frances M. Hill and W. Andrew Taylor

The article examines the emerging paradigm of totalquality management and summarises its underlyingtheory and principles. The relationship betweenquality assurance and…

Abstract

The article examines the emerging paradigm of total quality management and summarises its underlying theory and principles. The relationship between quality assurance and total quality management is discussed with reference to ISO 9000. Higher education institutions are aligned with a service organisation model and the resultant implications for the development of a TQM culture are outlined. These issues include the emphasis on a team ethos, a greater focus on the marketplace, the identification of customers, the pursuit of continuous improvement and the strengthening of feedback linkages from the environment. Potential problems with the adoption of such service sector models are mentioned in the context of scholarship and the commercial quality terminology of “zero defects” and “right first time” thinking.

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International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Andrew Taylor and Frances M. Hill

Examines the emerging paradigm of total quality management andsummarizes its implications for higher education. Rather thanprescribing a set of generic implementation…

Abstract

Examines the emerging paradigm of total quality management and summarizes its implications for higher education. Rather than prescribing a set of generic implementation steps, suggests that there are other, more significant, factors to be considered related to the timing of the initiative rather than where it should begin. Discusses four necessary issues: the removal of abstraction from the concept of quality in higher education; organization‐wide understanding of the customer; the importance of assessing the current quality level; and the need for strategic quality planning. Also cites classical organizational facets such as structure, culture, human resource management and leadership as being among the determinants of TQM success – concentration on these key matters attenuates the importance of the method of implementation. Argues that to disregard these harbingers of success is to risk long‐term damage to the organization and considerably reduce the likelihood of sustained and self‐generating organizational improvement.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1986

Frances M. Hill

This article reports the results of a longitudinal study of some of the earliest quality circle (QC) programmes to be established in the United Kingdom. The 27 companies…

Abstract

This article reports the results of a longitudinal study of some of the earliest quality circle (QC) programmes to be established in the United Kingdom. The 27 companies in question were first contacted in 1981. A second survey, conducted in April/May 1985, aimed to find out how many of the QC programmes have survived the test of time and in what circumstances. Reasons for the termination of individual circles and programmes were also sought. Forty per cent of the programmes unequivocally remain operative in organisations where senior management tend to be committed to the QC concept; the trade unions have been reasonably receptive or indifferent, the working environment is conducive to this type of initiative, and there have been no major crises, such as redundancy or serious retrenchment. The main reasons for QC programme termination were closure of sites or redundancy, and lack of support from senior management. Regarding those organisations in which QCs did not survive, the majority of respondents nevertheless felt that the technique has the potential to make a valuable contribution to British industry, primarily in relation to employee involvement.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Frances M. Hill and Lee K. Collins

The aim of this study, which followed two prior postal surveys, was to explore in detail, the roles of incremental improvement typified by TQM, and radical innovation in…

Abstract

The aim of this study, which followed two prior postal surveys, was to explore in detail, the roles of incremental improvement typified by TQM, and radical innovation in the form of BPR, in organisational change strategies. The empirical research comprised six in‐depth case studies, the selection of the case organisations being purposive rather than on a representative basis. The key research questions that shaped the empirical research, emanated from the prior research and from extensive reviews of relevant literatures, which had raised many questions. It was found that, at the case organisations, TQM and BPR were regarded as complementary approaches to organisational change rather than being mutually exclusive, as some writers have suggested. Also, it was found that many of the lessons and experiences gained from TQM, were fundamental in designing and implementing new processes. In general, the change profiles of the six case organisations resembled the episodic pattern identified by Orlikowski and Tyre (1993) rather than the “‘big bang”’ approach advocated by Hammer (1990). The merits of the former are explored. Because of the limitations of the research methodologies employed, the authors acknowledge the need for further investigation into the roles of TQM and BPR in organisational change strategies.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Frances M. Hill

Studies two Northern Ireland manufacturing companies, Shirtco and Carpetco, to generate some quantitative data concerning possible attitudinal and behavioural outcomes of…

Abstract

Studies two Northern Ireland manufacturing companies, Shirtco and Carpetco, to generate some quantitative data concerning possible attitudinal and behavioural outcomes of quality circle (QC) participation. Attention focused on three variables: (1) the attitudes of QC participants and those of comparable non‐participants to the work situation; (2) the quantity and quality of output achieved by QC participants and by comparable non‐participants; and (3) the short‐term absence rates of QC participants and comparable non‐participants. An attempt also was made to measure participants′ attitudes to the QC programmes. The findings at Carpetco were not encouraging, as attitudes towards QC participation were ambivalent, and there was little statistically significant evidence of QC participation producing a positive influence on attitudes or on the quantity and quality of output. Nor was there any evidence of the QC programme having generated significant cost‐savings. However, QC participation may have reduced the tendency to take casual days off work. The situation at Shirtco was rather different, as in one of the three work sections studied, QC participation may have had a positive influence on attitudes, quantity of output and amount of time spent on productive work, but not on attendance. The position regarding the other two work sections studied at Shirtco was much more equivocal. There was no evidence of any significant cost‐savings having emanated from the QC programme at Shirtco. Concludes that unless a QC initiative is accompanied by other changes in the general work situation, it will almost certainly produce marginal benefits at best. Quality circles are probably used to best effect when they comprise part of a wider initiative such as total quality management (TQM). Perhaps it is as a means of helping to put aspects of TQM into effect that the real value of QCs will be demonstrated.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Frances M. Hill and Lee K. Collins

Presents a model of organisational transformation drawing on case study research and a review of relevant literature. Concludes that it is important for change managers to…

Abstract

Presents a model of organisational transformation drawing on case study research and a review of relevant literature. Concludes that it is important for change managers to understand how both the internal and external environments can influence organisational change strategies and activities. Suggests that one potential contribution of the model of organisational transformation is that it may provide guidance and insight for managers attempting such reconstruction.

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International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 17 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Frances M. Hill

Explains why companies wishing to make the transition to TQM must address the issue of organizational learning. Also provides some evidence that quality circles (QC) can…

Abstract

Explains why companies wishing to make the transition to TQM must address the issue of organizational learning. Also provides some evidence that quality circles (QC) can facilitate organizational learning in the quality context. Discusses three theoretical stages of organizational learning, and demonstrates how QCs can assist organizations in progressing through the first two of these. Explores specific aspects of organizational learning relevant to TQM, which can be effected through the medium of QCs. Concludes that QCs could prove a useful vehicle for initiating some of the changes and attendant learning which the transition to TQM entails.

Details

Training for Quality, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4875

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Frances M. Hill

Explains why companies wishing to make the transition to TQM must address the issue of organizational learning. Provides some evidence that quality circles (QCs) can…

Abstract

Explains why companies wishing to make the transition to TQM must address the issue of organizational learning. Provides some evidence that quality circles (QCs) can facilitate organizational learning in the quality context. Discusses three theoretical stages of organizational learning, and demonstrates how QCs can assist organizations in progressing through the first two of these. Explores specific aspects of organizational learning relevant to TQM, which can be effected through the medium of QCs. Concludes that QCs could prove a useful vehicle for initiating some of the changes and attendant learning which the transition to TQM entails.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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