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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2020

Faiz Alotaibi and Frances Johnson

This study examines the use of the search engine, Google Scholar, from the perspective of a specific study group, that of international postgraduate students. Based on the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the use of the search engine, Google Scholar, from the perspective of a specific study group, that of international postgraduate students. Based on the theory of task perceived performance and effort expectancy influencing intention to use, further factors of system, individual, social and organisational, in the postgraduate student context are explored.

Design/methodology/approach

The questionnaire for the measurement of 11 factors was developed from related studies of e-library use, and data were collected from 200 international postgraduate students studying in the UK. Analysis using confirmatory factor analysis established the contextual influencing factors, and structural equation modeling examined the predicted model.

Findings

The findings confirmed the influence of the task-based factors of performance and expectancy and revealed that these were based on the perception of the visibility, accessibility and relevance of the system, and on perceived self-efficacy. The perception postgraduates held of themselves as competent users of Google Scholar was further borne out in the participants' own words when asked for the reason for their preference.

Originality/value

The approach taken enables research into use of search tools to go beyond ease of use as a main driver and to explore the relationship held among the internal and external influences of use. Recommendations for further user research are suggested as well as possible impact on the university library provision and support of services for students.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 72 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Claire Ellis, Frances Johnson and Jennifer Rowley

Academic libraries have sought to become the leaders in the provision of information literacy (IL). The purpose of this paper is to identify to what extent IL is being…

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1796

Abstract

Purpose

Academic libraries have sought to become the leaders in the provision of information literacy (IL). The purpose of this paper is to identify to what extent IL is being promoted through institutional websites.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from all UK university websites (n=133) in early 2015 to identify the promotion of IL. Content analysis was used for the five categories: IL in the mission statement, visions or strategic plan; IL model or framework; IL policy; IL assessment; and, IL training. Data collection was limited to information in the public domain which could be accessed from individual websites, which were searched and browsed systematically.

Findings

In total, 85.7 per cent of universities promote IL to some extent on their websites in at least one of the five categories, however the degree of the information provided varied extensively. Less than 6 per cent of universities promote IL at institutional level. Only 17.3 per cent refer to a model or framework, 15.8 per cent show their IL policy and 9 per cent provide information on their assessment of students’ IL skills. Information on IL training is offered on 84.2 per cent of websites, the most common method being online tutorials, although 52.6 per cent only offer training for one or two aspects of IL, primarily information seeking and citing and referencing.

Originality/value

This paper provides up-to-date data concerning how universities in the UK promote IL in the public domain via their websites. It should be of interest to academic librarians who are responsible for IL provision.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Book part
Publication date: 4 July 2013

John Maynard

Purpose – The purpose of this study is to reveal a missing chapter of Australian Aboriginal history. Jack Johnson is known as the first black Heavyweight…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this study is to reveal a missing chapter of Australian Aboriginal history. Jack Johnson is known as the first black Heavyweight Champion of the world but little is known of his inspiration to many oppressed groups around the globe including Aboriginal Australia. Johnson was flamboyant, outspoken and deeply proud of his heritage.

Design/methodology/approach – This chapter is undertaken as restorative history and examines the interconnected international networks of cultural exchange operational in the early decades of the twentieth century. It privileges the tools of historical narrative (story) as a major method, and is based largely on historical newspapers sources’. Press coverage can provide fascinating insight into historical characters and can deliver their voice and thoughts at the time, and newspapers remain important in forming public opinion.

Findings – Jack Johnson would become one of many influences from the international Black Diaspora upon Aboriginal Australia across the twentieth century.

Originality/value – John Maynard’s work on Jack Johnson (Maynard, J. (2003). Vision, Voice and Influence – The rise of the Australian Aboriginal Progressive Association. Australian Historical Studies, 121(April), 91–105, 2005, 2007) and more recently Theresa Runstedtler’s study (2012) has uncovered transnational links of Jack Johnson to many oppressed groups globally including Aboriginal Australia. This current study places Johnson’s impact upon Aboriginal Australia at the forefront of a shift and awakening awareness of Aboriginal Australians of their global political and racial challenges.

Details

Native Games: Indigenous Peoples and Sports in the Post-Colonial World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-592-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1984

A. Roberts and I.J. Anderson

In France the state controlled training of apprentices is well developed and integrated with vocational education generally. The article offers an analysis and comparison…

Abstract

In France the state controlled training of apprentices is well developed and integrated with vocational education generally. The article offers an analysis and comparison with the UK system, which lags behind France in providing an educated, trained and flexible workforce.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Jason Whalley and Peter Curwen

As the repercussions of 3G licensing reverberate across the telecommunications industry, it has frequently been speculated that the European mobile communications industry…

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1619

Abstract

As the repercussions of 3G licensing reverberate across the telecommunications industry, it has frequently been speculated that the European mobile communications industry is about to consolidate around a handful of players. However, many of these speculative comments fail to take into account either the scale of the players concerned or how they have acquired licences in the past. In this paper, we establish licence ownerships patterns, identifying in the process 13 multiple licence owners that collectively own 161 of the 225 second and third generation licences that have been offered to date across Europe. The multiple licence owners are then categorised by their scale and geographical focus, demonstrating in the process the considerable variation that occurs in both of these areas.

Details

info, vol. 5 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2017

Claudette Lafaye and Laurent Thévenot

There are a number of conflicts today involving groups and individuals as regards nature in its various forms. The aim of this article is to examine how these give rise to…

Abstract

There are a number of conflicts today involving groups and individuals as regards nature in its various forms. The aim of this article is to examine how these give rise to changes in the forms of critique and justification that underpin them. Based on various points of disagreement as to how nature should be developed, three possibilities of change have been put forward for examination according to the importance of the transformations required: (a) integration of the model into existing orders of justification, (b) development of a new order based on the same model, (c) serious adjustment of the underlying common matrix of orders and the basis it offers for appreciating injustice.

Details

Justification, Evaluation and Critique in the Study of Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-379-1

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Article
Publication date: 19 January 2010

Frances Johnson and Jennifer Rowley

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the special issue on research carried out at the Department of Information and Communications at Manchester Metropolitan University.

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568

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the special issue on research carried out at the Department of Information and Communications at Manchester Metropolitan University.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reflects on two factors: the context of the Department within the University; and beyond that in the “city region” of Manchester. It also introduces the contributions to the special issue from the Department.

Findings

The papers are opinion pieces, exploratory studies, evaluation of practice and critical perspectives and reflects the research of the Department of Information and Communications in the context of developments in the information and knowledge disciplines. The scope ranges from the detailed study of a particular system or organization to the understanding of the sector, which enables the information and communications industry.

Originality/value

The paper is important in the face of the renewed focus on the applicability of the academic enterprise.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 62 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Bernard Surlemont, Diego Chantrain, Frédéric Nlemvo and Colin Johnson

The aim of this paper to shed light on the strategies adopted by chefs and to identify the most successful in terms of Michelin rating and profitability.

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3664

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper to shed light on the strategies adopted by chefs and to identify the most successful in terms of Michelin rating and profitability.

Design/methodology/approach

In‐depth exploratory interviews with 20 great chefs located in France, Belgium, the UK and Switzerland having gained two or three Michelin stars over the last ten years.

Findings

Chefs use three different strategies for revenue‐generation: core business, full diversification and partial diversification. The reasoning behind the choice of strategy varies between two‐ and three‐star restaurants. The first strategy seems to lead to higher Michelin star ratings, and strategy, the second seems superior in terms of profitability. The third strategy yields inferior results, but is less risky.

Research limitations/implications

The observations are constrained to “recently successful” restaurants, and hence may not be applicable to longer‐standing restaurants.

Practical implications

Concentrating on the core business leads to higher star rating, but lower profitability. Full diversification increases profitability but can jeopardize Michelin rating. The middle‐of‐the‐road approach seems inferior in any case.

Originality/value

To this day, little research has been conducted on the way in which great chefs having two or three stars in the famed Michelin Red Guide run their businesses. In particular, very little is known about their revenue‐generating strategies: what options are available and which revenue models are the “best”. This paper is exploratory in nature and aims to inform further research about luxury restaurants.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 19 January 2010

Jenny Craven, Frances Johnson and Geoff Butters

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the usability of the user interface to an online catalogue and to explore how user assessment of both system usability and…

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2376

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the usability of the user interface to an online catalogue and to explore how user assessment of both system usability and functionality can provide recommendations for the improved design.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on previous studies, the usability testing used a mixture of search tasks, interviews and a structured focus group. Representative users completed tasks designed to test the system's features and a “think aloud” protocol collected data about the users' responses when using the system and on its perceived functionality.

Findings

The analysis of the data on users' evaluation, preferences and expectations by a set of usability attributes enabled recommendations to be made with respect to key areas of the system functionality.

Practical implications

The usability study helped to improve the “look and feel” of the interface and demonstrates how the user expectation of what constitutes a supported experience can help make recommendations for the design of a system that is both usable and useful.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates the benefits of using a mixture of approaches to test system usability and to gain a better understanding of usability from the perspective of the system's users, their expectations and perceived usefulness of the system.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 62 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Jason Whalley and Peter Curwen

In recent times there has been much speculation about the need for consolidation in the European telecommunications industry. However, consolidation has not happened as…

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2773

Abstract

Purpose

In recent times there has been much speculation about the need for consolidation in the European telecommunications industry. However, consolidation has not happened as expected with the market fragmenting instead. This article seeks to explain this phenomenon.

Design/methodology/approach

A distinction is made between second and third generation mobile technologies, and the ownership of mobile licences in 41 European countries identified. The ownership footprints of mobile operators are mapped, with patterns of consolidation and fragmentation commented upon.

Findings

The results show that, although many mobile operators have been intent on building empires both within and outside Europe, almost all of these operators have been forced to curtail their ambitions. As a consequence, consolidation has not occurred as expected.

Originality/value

It was widely anticipated that mobile operators would use third generation licensing to expand their footprints into new markets. This paper, however, argues that this has not happened and the European market has instead fragmented.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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