Search results

1 – 10 of over 10000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Executive summary
Publication date: 30 January 2020

FRANCE: Libya strategy fosters war, not peace

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-ES250359

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
Content available
Article
Publication date: 20 June 2019

Morgane Le Breton and Franck Aggeri

This paper forms part of the social and environmental accounting literature. The purpose of this paper is to study how the strategy of development and dissemination of a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper forms part of the social and environmental accounting literature. The purpose of this paper is to study how the strategy of development and dissemination of a carbon accounting tool by a public organisation affects the actions of companies.

Design/methodology/approach

It is based on the Foucaldian concept of a strategic dispositif whose components and evolution over time will be analysed. The methodology will be based on a case study of ADEME, the French Environment and Energy Management Agency, through the preparation and dissemination of Bilan Carbone® – the French greenhouse gas accounting tool – between 2000 and 2017.

Findings

The results highlight the specific features of the dispositif formed by carbon accounting in France, namely, the integration of small companies, use of the tool to directly support actions and financial independence.

Practical implications

The theoretical contribution of this work consists in showing the benefits of the concept of a strategic dispositif to understand the action of companies in terms of the transition towards low-carbon strategies.

Social implications

Its empirical contribution lies in the emphasis placed on the specific role of public authorities in tackling climate change within the sphere of carbon accounting methodologies largely dominated by private organisations.

Originality/value

The theoretical contribution of this work consists in showing the benefits of the concept of a strategic dispositif to understand the action of companies in terms of the transition towards low-carbon strategies.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Amie Sexton

The purpose of this paper is to trace the dispersed yet influential presence of the French in the Australian wine industry from the beginning of the industry until the…

Downloads
958

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to trace the dispersed yet influential presence of the French in the Australian wine industry from the beginning of the industry until the present day. It looks at the physical presence of the French on Australian soil (e.g. winemakers, companies, vines) and the French cultural influence (e.g. publications, stereotypes, promotion). It aims to provide an historical context in which to place questions concerning contemporary Australian attitudes to French wine and to wine in general.

Design/methodology/approach

Historical review of French presence and influence on the Australian wine industry using historical and contemporary documents and records.

Findings

While the French presence in Australia has always been minimal, it exerts a powerful influence on the Australian wine industry. Throughout the history of the industry, French individuals and culture have maintained the image of “French expertise”, thus French wine is still the point of reference for the Australian wine industry and consumer. The high status enjoyed by French wine can be attributed in part to the historical influence of the French on Australian wine.

Research limitations/implications

Further research into attitudes to French wine in Australia is needed to understand consumer preferences.

Originality/value

The paper represents one of the first attempts to investigate the presence and influence of French wines and winemaking in the Australian wine industry. It presents an historical account of the French in the Australian wine industry and the influence of French culture on Australian wine.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Frances Foster

The change to a market economy in EasternEurope has led to the need for managementeducation. A British Diploma in ManagementStudies is being studied by students in…

Abstract

The change to a market economy in Eastern Europe has led to the need for management education. A British Diploma in Management Studies is being studied by students in Hungary. The Hungarian students are studying with distance learning materials produced by Buckinghamshire College of HE, and are supported by Hungarian tutors who conduct seminars in English. The students on the course tend to be better qualified academically than their UK counterparts. They are highly motivated and keen to study and obtain English qualifications. The students′ assignments are completed in English and the marks are moderated by staff at Buckinghamshire College. This method of developing management education could serve as a model for other East European countries.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 16 April 2021

Janaka B. Lewis

This chapter connects Black women’s histories of educational leadership after emancipation to the need for creative leadership in academia now. This chapter focuses on…

Abstract

This chapter connects Black women’s histories of educational leadership after emancipation to the need for creative leadership in academia now. This chapter focuses on ways in which nineteenth-century educator and activists Lucy Craft Laney and Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, among others, addressed challenges of race and gender and how their stories offer opportunities to consider current needs in higher education. Contrary to the freedom that academia is supposed to promote, topics in gender and ethnic studies may be challenged or restricted as part of liberal political agendas. Additionally, this chapter considers ways in which academia has been used to limit freedom for students and the need for innovative and creative ways to promote academic freedom in educational settings.

Details

Academic Freedom: Autonomy, Challenges and Conformation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-883-3

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2014

Joachim Schöpfel

The United Nations action plan on sustainable development, called Agenda 21, is applied as a new framework to strategic management of libraries and information services is…

Abstract

The United Nations action plan on sustainable development, called Agenda 21, is applied as a new framework to strategic management of libraries and information services is described in this chapter. Strategic management with Agenda 21 involves adapting the library to its social and ecological environment. It affects the entire organization including institutional and individual strategies. Key issues are ecology, social responsibility, accountability and ethics. The chapter is not about climate change, but is about goal definition and resource allocation. The message is that library management should contribute to the sustainable development of society on a local level, in addition to its particular cultural or scientific objectives. The global approach of Agenda 21 helps to evaluate library performance as a system, against criteria derived from the action plan, and to develop sustainable scenarios integrating social and ecological impact. Also, following the Agenda 21 philosophy, no performance level such as service quality, information technology, financial balance or carbon footprint should be evaluated unrelated to the other levels. In the new societal context, social, economic and ecological aspects are inter-connected. The author’s conviction is that the traditional cultural and scientific functions of libraries cannot be isolated from this environment, and that strategic library management must integrate sustainable development, not as a marginal element, but at the heart of analysis and decision-making.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2020

Loic Vadelorge

The development of public art in French New Towns in the 1970s and 1980s was one of the most spectacular forms of state intervention in urban policy. Along with the new…

Abstract

The development of public art in French New Towns in the 1970s and 1980s was one of the most spectacular forms of state intervention in urban policy. Along with the new architecture programmes, the hundreds of works of art that adorn the public realm of the French New Towns help to differentiate them from the grands ensembles. This public art, which was highly publicised at the time, represents a heritage intrinsically linked to the urban history of New Towns but also to the history of French cultural policies at the end of the twentieth century. Artistic and town planning innovations underlie many public art projects. Artists and town planners participated, on a city scale, in the cultural developments that sought to respond to the expectations of the May 1968 crisis. In New Towns, the role of art was not simply to provide a backdrop to beautify the city but also to contribute to the success of new urban neighbourhoods. This involved placing visual landmarks in the urban space, confronting the residents with living art (painted walls, sculpted staircases, light paths, etc.).

The appropriation of these works of art by the public and councils was far from unanimous. It was only at the beginning of the twenty-first century that a heritage reflection emerged and led to a list of works of art being drawn up, with a view to protecting them. With the disappearance of state supervision over certain New Towns (1998–2002), damaged works has become a stigma in the public realm. A policy of restoration is being therefore introduced in certain New Towns, with public art participating in the identity of councils that do not hesitate to present themselves as ‘contemporary towns’ and take on the restoration or achievement of certain works that they now consider to be their heritage.

Details

Lessons from British and French New Towns: Paradise Lost?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-430-9

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

Vince Edwards and Frances Foster

Seeks to assess the impact of “imported” management education on thedevelopment of managers in former command economies of Eastern Europe.In particular, examines the…

Downloads
396

Abstract

Seeks to assess the impact of “imported” management education on the development of managers in former command economies of Eastern Europe. In particular, examines the attitudes of Hungarian managers who have completed a British Diploma in Management. Statements made by the managers in their projects were noted against a number of factors, which have previously been found to be characteristic of command and market economies, in an attempt to measure the extent to which the “cognitive maps” of the managers are evolving in response to the new situation. The analysis showed that in some areas the process has begun tentatively, but in a number of aspects is a long way from being fully internalized. The managers appear to have understood the vocabulary without necessarily internalizing the concepts required.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Frances Foster

The growth of women in management positions has largely been at juniorlevels. This has been particularly so within the education sector, wherethe growth in the number of…

Downloads
846

Abstract

The growth of women in management positions has largely been at junior levels. This has been particularly so within the education sector, where the growth in the number of women employed has had little impact on the proportion of women in senior positions. One explanation for the lack of women in senior management positions has been the male stereotyping of the manager role. Reports on a survey, using the Schein Descriptive Index, which was carried out among academics in 19 UK business schools or management departments of the new universities which showed different patterns of stereotyping from that found among managers in other organizations. Male academics at lower levels did not stereotype the manager role at all, but those in senior positions stereotyped the manager role as male. Among the female academics the results showed no association between the characteristics of successful managers and those of women in general, but some association between the characteristics of managers and men in general.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Véronique Gille

Empirical evidence of education spillovers in developing countries and rural contexts is scarce and focuses on specific channels. The purpose of this paper is to provide…

Abstract

Purpose

Empirical evidence of education spillovers in developing countries and rural contexts is scarce and focuses on specific channels. The purpose of this paper is to provide evidence of such spillovers in rural India, by evaluating the overall impact of neighbours' education on farm productivity.

Design/methodology/approach

The author uses cross‐sectional data from the India Human Development Survey of 2005. Spatial econometric tools are used to take into account social distance between neighbours. To be sure that the author's definition of a neighbourhood does not drive the results, three different definitions of neighbours were tested.

Findings

The results show that education spillovers are substantial: one additional year in the mean level of education of neighbours increases households' farm productivity by 2 per cent. These findings are robust to changes in specification.

Research limitations/implications

The results open the way to further research. In particular, this paper does not explore the channels through which this spillover effect happens.

Practical implications

This paper confirms the choice of improving education in developing countries: giving a child education will certainly provide him/her with greater revenues and it may also provide his/her neighbours with greater revenues. The paper shows the importance for policy makers of taking into account education spillovers and policies' complementarity when facing political trade‐offs.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the few to underline that education externalities do not only exist in urban contexts and education spillovers do not only occur between workers of the manufacturing and service sectors. There are also spillovers in sectors considered as more traditional, such as agriculture.

1 – 10 of over 10000