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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1998

Mary Davies, Frances Boyle and Susan Osborne

The growth of CAS‐IAS (current alerting service — individual article supply) services in the 1990s has not delivered the rapid benefits expected by information…

Abstract

The growth of CAS‐IAS (current alerting service — individual article supply) services in the 1990s has not delivered the rapid benefits expected by information practitioners. This article focuses on the alerting aspects of CAS‐IAS services and documents the results of a series of surveys carried out at a UK cancer research institute over a four year period. By the first quarter of 1997, in over 50% of cases in a sample group of titles the shelf issue was more current, or as current, as the alerting services. The article also includes a mid‐1997 overview of the CAS‐IAS services available and lists factors to be considered by information practitioners in any evaluation of the document delivery aspect of CAS‐IAS services. The conclusion is that the monitoring of service developments and their performance will have to continue for the foreseeable future.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Frances Boyle

Ejournals, in all their guises, are here to stay and as such they become another resource that requires management, maintenance and resourcing. Integrating this new…

Abstract

Ejournals, in all their guises, are here to stay and as such they become another resource that requires management, maintenance and resourcing. Integrating this new resource into the library collection and an existing catalogue presents its own range of problems, some of which will be explored within the context of the University of Liverpool experience.

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VINE, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Frances Boyle and Mary Davies

The access versus holdings debate has been one of the “hot topics” within the information world for some time, and the performance of document delivery services is an…

Abstract

The access versus holdings debate has been one of the “hot topics” within the information world for some time, and the performance of document delivery services is an integral part of the discussion. This article focuses on work currently being undertaken at the University of Liverpool to investigate and evaluate existing and future document supply services. Reference is made to related literature, the background to the pilot projects is explained, and the criteria utilised for the inclusion of services are propounded. A detailed evaluation of the following services is included: BL’s inside, BODOS, Ei Text from Elsevier Engineering Information Inc., LAMDA and UnCover. Preliminary results are reported. The conclusion to date is that, in their current from, document delivery services cannot be seen as a panacea for resolving the holdings versus access debate.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

Frances Boyle and Chris Brown

UKRR is an innovative programme that ensures that copies of print journals remain available to the research community indefinitely. At the same time the aim is to free up…

Abstract

Purpose

UKRR is an innovative programme that ensures that copies of print journals remain available to the research community indefinitely. At the same time the aim is to free up substantial and valuable space in academic libraries, resulting in significant cost savings. This paper aims to provide an update on this groundbreaking initiative – one year into Phase 2. It seeks to outline the processes and workflows which underpin UKRR and to report early findings.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive account of the UKRR process and methodology is provided, indicating how they support the programme's overarching principles.

Findings

It is still early days in Phase 2 of UKRR, but already interesting data are being gathered. These will inform further analyses.

Originality/value

UKRR is a high profile national programme that is attracting a lot of interest both nationally and internationally. The paper documents a practical example of a shared services initiative in the UK.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2011

Mike McGrath

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the literature concerning interlending and document supply and related matters.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the literature concerning interlending and document supply and related matters.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is based on the reading of over 150 journals as well as monographs, reports and websites.

Findings

Resistance to the Big Deals for journals is still growing – in particular because of the current budget cuts that are hitting libraries badly. A number of articles from around the world indicate that document supply is still alive and kicking.

Originality/value

The paper represents a useful source of information for librarians and others interested in document supply and related matters such as resource sharing and open access.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Andrew Cox

In VINE 113 and 114 our authors look at library services on the Web, with half a dozen case studies of excellent applications.

Abstract

In VINE 113 and 114 our authors look at library services on the Web, with half a dozen case studies of excellent applications.

Details

VINE, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2013

Daryl Yang

This paper aims to provide a case study of the development of UK Research Reserve (UKRR): a partnership between the UK higher education sector and the British Library. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a case study of the development of UK Research Reserve (UKRR): a partnership between the UK higher education sector and the British Library. The first of its kind in the UK as well as internationally, UK Research Reserve has helped its members de‐duplicate low‐use journals and release shelf space, as well as retain access to research material. UKRR is currently under review to determine a sustainable model if public funding becomes unavailable. This paper describes the journey UKRR has taken so far.

Design/methodology/approach

Research methods adopted can be categorised into two main groups of activities: information gathering (desk research, survey and interviews); and information analysis and synthesis (literature, data, documentation).

Findings

Through the case study of UKRR, the author identifies challenges and issues faced by research libraries, as well as the whole HE sector. This paper presents values and synergies UKRR has created for its members and beyond. It also shares UKRR's journey in identifying a sustainable business model beyond its current phase.

Originality/value

The author reviewed some second‐hand data to present a broader picture of challenges the HE sector is facing. Most data and documentation that support the other sections of the paper are first‐hand, and have been generated by UKRR's team.

Details

Library Management, vol. 34 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2020

David Wilson and Michael Brookes

This paper aims to explore the reasons for and the subsequent longer-term impact of the closure of the Barlinnie Special Unit (BSU).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the reasons for and the subsequent longer-term impact of the closure of the Barlinnie Special Unit (BSU).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is both descriptive, providing an overview of the work of the BSU, and conceptual in that it argues that the limits of “prisoner rehabilitation” are observed in the closure of the BSU, which sounds a warning for other penal therapeutic communities and what it means to operate effectively.

Findings

The BSU which assisted long-term, difficult and violent prisoners moderate their prison behaviour and then to live non-offending lives, lost the confidence of government ministers and officials, as well as senior prison managers and, seemingly, the public, so closed after being in operation for 21 years. The impact of this has been that the Scottish Prison Service has not introduced, or attempted to introduce, a similar regime for managing and treating violent and disruptive prisoners.

Practical implications

There are important lessons to be learned from the BSU experience for all who manage and work in specialist, prison therapeutic units or within prison therapeutic regimes. This includes balancing the therapeutic elements of the regime, which may involve engaging in practices which are outside the norm for custodial establishments, with those establishments’ security and operational requirements, so as to not to create a disconnect between addressing offending behaviour and maintaining expected standards of wider prison conduct.

Originality/value

While there have been previous evaluations of the BSU, the longer-term impact has neither been previously considered and nor has the unit’s closure been considered from a penal philosophical perspective.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1979

In order to succeed in an action under the Equal Pay Act 1970, should the woman and the man be employed by the same employer on like work at the same time or would the…

Abstract

In order to succeed in an action under the Equal Pay Act 1970, should the woman and the man be employed by the same employer on like work at the same time or would the woman still be covered by the Act if she were employed on like work in succession to the man? This is the question which had to be solved in Macarthys Ltd v. Smith. Unfortunately it was not. Their Lordships interpreted the relevant section in different ways and since Article 119 of the Treaty of Rome was also subject to different interpretations, the case has been referred to the European Court of Justice.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2009

Barry Nyhan

The purpose of this paper is to discuss Ireland's national apprenticeship programme, introduced in 1993, in the context of the country's evolving economic and social policies.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss Ireland's national apprenticeship programme, introduced in 1993, in the context of the country's evolving economic and social policies.

Design/methodology/approach

A critical analysis is undertaken of the industrial climate in Ireland, which prevented the introduction of a national apprenticeship programme, until 1993.

Findings

The paper argues that the main factor for the successful implementation of this programme in 1993 was the emergence of a new climate of cooperation among the social partners providing the institutional foundations for the programme. This cooperation was a result of the 1991 ground‐breaking “social partnership” agreement between employers, trade unions and government, in signing up to a joint national framework programme.

Research limitations/implications

The paper only briefly looks at earlier efforts – from the 1960s onwards – to introduce a well‐functioning programme, which are seen as a learning period, underpinning the breakthrough of the 1990s.

Practical implications

In acknowledging the success of the programme, the paper asks whether this success can be built on further. This could be achieved through increasing the number of apprenticeships, through enlarging the apprenticeship regulatory framework. This could then have a knock‐on effect on employment generation and skill development as, for example, has happened in Australia.

Originality/value

The paper shows that, despite comments about Ireland being institutionally unsuited for apprenticeship – owing to the lack of an industrial cultural tradition of cooperation, it did, in fact, create an industrial cultural climate to provide the social foundations for a well‐functioning programme.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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