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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2011

Keith Walker, Benjamin Kutsyuruba and Brian Noonan

The purpose of this paper is to examine the trust‐related aspect of the work of school principals. The authors' exploratory examination of the Canadian school principals'…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the trust‐related aspect of the work of school principals. The authors' exploratory examination of the Canadian school principals' perceptions of their moral agency and trust‐brokering roles described their establishing, maintaining, and recovering of trust in schools. This article is delimited to the selected perceptions of Canadian principals' regarding the fragile nature of trust in their school settings.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used the open‐ended responses from surveys sent to school principals (n=177), who responded to the authors' invitation to complete a survey, as part of a larger study, in the ten provinces and three territories of Canada. The data analyses included theme and cross‐theme analyses.

Findings

This study has pointed to the perception that trust‐related matters are an important, yet a fragile, aspect of the work of principals. Principals often have to deal with trust‐related matters, which have caused trustworthiness to be threatened and trusting relationships to be broken. Trust‐related problems contribute to the fragility of trust and frequently seem to pertain to relationships between principal and other administrators, staff members, parents, and students. Most of the time, principals as leaders felt personal responsibility to make sure relationships among all stakeholders were sustained and, if broken, restored. The prevalent belief among participants in the study was that trusting relationships, though fragile and often broken, are subject to the hope of restoration and renewal.

Originality/value

This study provided valuable findings that enhance the understanding of ethical decision making and trust brokering amongst the Canadian school principals. While the discussions of trust and moral agency are certainly present in the educational literature, not much is known about the self‐perceived role of a principal as both a moral agent and trust broker. Moreover, there is perceived need for qualitative studies in the area of trust in educational leadership.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 49 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Book part
Publication date: 8 December 2016

Benjamin Kutsyuruba and Keith D. Walker

It is well known that trust is an essential, yet a fragile part of organizational life. Because trust sometimes has to be placed without guarantees, it will inevitably be…

Abstract

It is well known that trust is an essential, yet a fragile part of organizational life. Because trust sometimes has to be placed without guarantees, it will inevitably be broken, violated, and damaged when parties involved in trustworthy relationships let others down. When trust-destroying events occur, trust is shattered and its level plummets quickly into the domain of distrust. The speed with which trust can be destroyed depends on the magnitude of damage from the act of untrustworthiness and the perceived intentionality of the untrustworthiness. Moreover, if seen as intentional, the destruction of trust is particularly severe, as intentional untrustworthiness reveals malevolent intentions that are seen as highly predictive of future untrustworthiness. Often, leaders are the ones responsible for improper handling of, destroying, or violating trust in their organizations. In this chapter, we explore the consequences of leaders for violating trust and examine how trust changes over time as a function of different types of violations and attempts at restoration. We argue that because distrust may irrevocably harm organizations, leaders as moral agents need to consciously work to rebuild relationships, restore broken trust, and instill hope.

Details

The Dark Side of Leadership: Identifying and Overcoming Unethical Practice in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-499-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Andrew Cormack

Failures of security rarely touch users and it is easy to dismiss the subject as a purely technical one. With the increasing reliance on computers for business critical…

Abstract

Failures of security rarely touch users and it is easy to dismiss the subject as a purely technical one. With the increasing reliance on computers for business critical systems, and in the light of the fragility of trust online reliability is becoming an increasingly important issue. Information Assurance (IA) is a method for achieving reliability in computer systems, which has been developed out of traditional risk management concepts. For the consistency of behaviour IA requires there needs to be a security culture among users, a shared set of beliefs, values and behaviour.This paper discusses the nature of such a security culture and how it may be created.

Details

VINE, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2012

Hongli Wang and Yunbo Lu

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the new concept of trust governance and how to design trust‐related governance mechanisms.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the new concept of trust governance and how to design trust‐related governance mechanisms.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper defines trust governance based on the nature of governance, and proposes the micro design approach from the perspective of active interpersonal strategy. Based on a literature review, trust governance emerges as a new organizing principle which needs to be taken into account when considering the fast development of knowledge. Active interpersonal strategy is highlighted as a way to build trust and several governance mechanisms are proposed.

Findings

This paper concludes that trust governance is an important and new research field, and is also a necessary route of organizational promotion from human control to self‐control. Interpersonal threat control strategy could understand and drop a hint about others'cognitive risk. Active trust could excite trust by virtue of active express friendship. Such active interpersonal strategies enable the manager to explore the situational confidence from the micro individual level, and facilitate the micro‐mechanism design.

Originality/value

The paper shows that trust governance could initiate the innovation performance of individuals, and promote interpersonal trust development and evolution.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

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Article
Publication date: 21 December 2015

Micaela Pinho and Ana Borges

– The purpose of this paper is to seek to elicit, in a context of economic crisis, the social preferences for the microallocation of scarce healthcare resources.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to seek to elicit, in a context of economic crisis, the social preferences for the microallocation of scarce healthcare resources.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from an online questionnaire which includes a hypothetical rationing choice scenario with four patients differentiated by their personal characteristics and health states competing for treatments and a set of statements that embodies: distributive criteria for prioritizing patients; the authorship of these types of decisions; and the likelihood of these decisions to be taken. Descriptive statistics, factor analysis and non-parametric test were used for describing and validating the data.

Findings

Findings suggest that respondents: support a pluralism of distributive principles in prioritizing patients with an incident in utilitarianism and the reducing of inequalities in health, translated in the fair-inning and in emotional arguments of fragility; trust in the health professional to make prioritization decisions; and are conscious that rationing decisions will be real in the short term.

Practical implications

The pursuit of efficiency and the equalizing of a lifetime health seem to be the criteria that should guide any rationing policy at the micro level.

Originality/value

This study addresses simultaneously several ethical principles inherent to microallocation healthcare resources in a suitable context in which Portugal is facing an economic crisis and where, consequently, rationing healthcare policies gain prominence on the political agenda.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

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Book part
Publication date: 18 August 2006

Günter K. Stahl, Chei Hwee Chua and Amy L. Pablo

Prior research on post-acquisition integration has paid little attention to the factors that influence the development of trust between the members of an acquiring firm…

Abstract

Prior research on post-acquisition integration has paid little attention to the factors that influence the development of trust between the members of an acquiring firm and those of the target firm. Using a policy capturing approach, we found that five aspects of the takeover situation and the integration process affect target firm members’ trust in the acquiring firm's management: takeover friendliness, national cultural similarity, interaction history of the acquiring firm and the target firm, retained autonomy, and attractiveness of the acquiring firm's HR policies. Our findings suggest that of the five trust antecedents, the attractiveness of the acquirer's HR policies is by far the most powerful predictor of target firm members’ trust in the acquiring firm's management. The implications for post-acquisition integration research and practice are discussed.

Details

Advances in Mergers and Acquisitions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-337-2

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Book part
Publication date: 21 December 2010

Günter K. Stahl and Sim B. Sitkin

Drawing on the trust literature and research on sociocultural integration in mergers and acquisitions (M&As), we develop a model of the antecedents and consequences of

Abstract

Drawing on the trust literature and research on sociocultural integration in mergers and acquisitions (M&As), we develop a model of the antecedents and consequences of trust dynamics in acquisitions. The model proposes that target firm members’ perceptions of the acquiring firm management's trustworthiness are affected by the relationship history of the firms, the interfirm distance, and the integration approach taken by the acquirer. Ability, benevolence, integrity, and value congruence perceptions are proposed to converge into a generalized trust judgment or result in a state of ambivalence, depending on whether the trustworthiness attributions are consistent or conflicting. The model explains the mechanisms by which trust and ambivalence may affect a variety of attitudinal and behavioral outcomes. A number of testable propositions are derived from this model, and the implications for M&A research and practice are discussed.

Details

Advances in Mergers and Acquisitions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-465-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Tim Owen and Jason L. Powell

This paper sets out to examine the relationship between trust and professional power in the context of post‐Foucauldian social theory. Understood in its micro‐political…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to examine the relationship between trust and professional power in the context of post‐Foucauldian social theory. Understood in its micro‐political terms and conceived as impacting on individual identity and agency at a number of levels: intrapersonal, interpersonal, organisational and macro levels.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual and theoretical approach.

Findings

The findings illustrate that the concept oftrust” and relationship to health services can be understood through a post‐Foucauldian lens.

Research limitations/implications

This is a very theoretical paper with implications for epistemological development grounded in understanding “trust” and ethics of self.

Originality/value

This is an original paper on post‐Foucauldian analysis of trust and relationship to health policy and professional autonomy.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 26 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Lisa S. Romero

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the literature on student trust and to examine the relationship between student trust, behavior, and academic outcomes in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the literature on student trust and to examine the relationship between student trust, behavior, and academic outcomes in high school. It asks, first, does trust have a positive effect on high school outcomes? Second, does trust influence student behavior, exerting an indirect effect on schooling outcomes? Third, are school size and student socioeconomic status (SES) antecedents of trust?

Design/methodology/approach

A nationally representative sample of students attending public high schools in the USA (n=10,585) is drawn from the Educational Longitudinal Study. Structural equation modeling is used to examine the relationship between student trust, behavior and high school outcomes, controlling for SES, school size and prior achievement. Multiple measures of academic achievement are considered.

Findings

There is a significant relationship between student trust, behavior and high school outcomes. Students who trust have fewer behavioral incidents and better academic outcomes with results suggesting that trust functions through behavior. This is true regardless of SES, school size or prior achievement.

Practical implications

School leaders cannot change parental income or education, but can build trust. Developing and attending to student trust may not only mean that students are better behaved but, more importantly, are more successful academically.

Social implications

In spite of decades of policy and legislation intended to improve schools, closing the achievement gap has proven elusive. One reason may be the relentless focus on physical artifacts of schooling, such as school organization, curriculum, testing and accountability, and a concomitant lack of attention to sociocognitive factors key to learning. Schools are social systems, and high levels of learning are unlikely to occur without a nurturing environment that includes trust.

Originality/value

This research makes a valuable contribution by focussing on student trust in high schools and by illuminating the relationship between trust, behavior, and academic outcomes. Results suggest that trust impacts a broad range of high school outcomes but functions indirectly through behavior.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 53 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Jorge Tiago Martins and Miguel Baptista Nunes

This paper aims to examine how academics enact trust in e-learning through an inductive identification of perceived risks and enablers involved in e-learning adoption, in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how academics enact trust in e-learning through an inductive identification of perceived risks and enablers involved in e-learning adoption, in the context of higher education institutions (HEIs).

Design/methodology/approach

Grounded Theory was the methodology used to systematically analyse data collected in semi-structured interviews with 62 academics. Data analysis followed the constant comparative method and its three-staged coding approach: open, axial and selective coding.

Findings

The resulting trajectory of trust factors is presented in a Grounded Theory narrative where individual change and integration through shared collective understanding and institutionalisation are discussed as stages leading to the overcoming of e-learning adoption barriers.

Originality/value

The paper proposes that the interplay between institutionalism and individualism has implications in the success or failure of strategies for the adoption of e-learning in HEIs, as perceived by academics. In practical terms, this points to the need for close attention to contextually sensitive trust-building mechanisms that promote the balance between academics’ commitments, values and sense of self-worth and centrally planned policy, rules, resources and exhortations that enable action.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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