Search results

1 – 10 of over 6000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Giacomo Laffranchini, John S. Hadjimarcou, Si Hyun Kim and Mike Braun

The purpose of this paper is to explore the internationalization process of small and medium family-owned businesses (FOBs). The authors strive to explain the extent to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the internationalization process of small and medium family-owned businesses (FOBs). The authors strive to explain the extent to which family business CEOs identify a signal in either the domestic or international environment for internationalization as a viable business opportunity.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors rely on signal detection theory to develop a conceptual model that explains the cognitive process inducing the CEO-founder of an FOB to discover and exploit an opportunity in the international market.

Findings

The conceptual model proposes that constraints in a family-firm’s domestic market, as well as opportunities in the foreign market act, as signal strength. However, family business CEO-founders’ centrality and inward orientation might lead them to ignore a signal by generating noise and reducing the motivation to collect further information concerning the trustworthiness of the signal.

Research limitations/implications

The model is conceptual; future research should strive for a potential way to operationalize the cognitive process described herein. In addition, the theoretical argument has been developed in the context of family firms wherein the founder plays a pivotal role. Future research may extend the theoretical arguments to those family firms that are at an advanced stage of development.

Originality/value

The study reconciles conflicting findings concerning the internationalization of FOBs. In doing so, the authors employ an interdisciplinary approach and develop a conceptual model that sheds additional light on the cognitive processes underlying internationalization decisions among founder-centered family firms.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Jocelene Buckman, Paul Jones and Samuel Buame

This paper aims to create a connection between entrepreneurial learning and succession planning in family-owned businesses (FOB), and how they work together to improve a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to create a connection between entrepreneurial learning and succession planning in family-owned businesses (FOB), and how they work together to improve a firm’s chances of survival beyond the founder within a Ghanaian context.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a phenomenological study, this work investigates succession planning processes in FOB, with the objective of developing a succession model suitable for the Ghanaian context. Using a constructivist perspective, six family businesses were studied, interviewing the founder, successor, family members, employees and customers therein.

Findings

Existing knowledge has been confirmed that succession is not a one-off event, but a process that takes place over time, requiring the buy-in of not just the founder and successor, but also other stakeholders, including the successor’s siblings and spouse (if any), whose support is imperative to the success of the process. This study reviewed and synthesised relevant research data into a conceptual framework.

Research limitations/implications

This study can potentially inform the basis of a longitudinal study, using the developed framework to confirm its robustness. It can also inform further quantitative research to validate the generalisability of the framework.

Practical implications

The study contributes to FOB practice, the holistic succession model spanning the founder’s entry into the business, to the post-succession period, and incorporating contextual intervening variables such as polygamy, religion and systems of inheritance, while also contributing to theory by proposing a comprehensive succession process theory to enhance understanding of the process.

Originality/value

The study contributes increased understanding of the essential elements in the succession process in an African context, what appropriate measures can be implemented for effective succession outcomes, and how key stakeholders of the business can be effectively managed as part of overseeing the succession process for positive organisational outcomes.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Sylvie Laforet

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of organisational culture (OC) on organisational innovation performance (OIP) in family small and medium-sized…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of organisational culture (OC) on organisational innovation performance (OIP) in family small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). It seeks to establish the type of culture that lead to high innovation performance in family firms.

Design/methodology/approach

A postal survey of family SMEs across sectors in the UK is conducted. The study employs multiple regression analyses to test which family business culture has an effect on OIP. Among the family business cultures tested are: an external cultural orientation, a flexible and open OC as well as an organisational climate based on open communication and trust, the founder culture, and a long-term cultural orientation.

Findings

The findings show that a paternalistic and founder culture type do not have a positive effect on family firm innovation performance, but an entrepreneurial-like culture does, i.e. one that is externally oriented, flexible, proactive (refer to an open culture) and long-term oriented. Similarly, an inward focus culture such as, the founder culture impedes innovation; while an outward focus culture such as, an external orientation culture has a positive effect on family firm innovation performance.

Originality/value

This study makes valuable contributions to the understanding of theory and practices of innovation in family businesses. It provides future research directions.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Rohit Deshpandé, Amir Grinstein, Sang-Hoon Kim and Elie Ofek

There is a lack of research on the link between the personal disposition of an entrepreneurial firm's founder, the firm's strategic orientation and its performance…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a lack of research on the link between the personal disposition of an entrepreneurial firm's founder, the firm's strategic orientation and its performance outcomes. Also, there is a lack of cross-national research on entrepreneurial firms’ strategic orientations. This paper seeks to address these gaps by exploring the differences in strategic orientation choices and their performance outcomes for American and Japanese entrepreneurial firms, focusing on founders’ achievement motivation as a key personal disposition.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted among 397 Japanese founders and 189 American ones.

Findings

This paper's key counterintuitive finding is that Japanese and American founders of entrepreneurial firms are more similar than is often suggested. The paper first finds that in both Japan and the US, achievement motivation is positively related to customer orientation and cost orientation while not being related to technological orientation. Second, it is found that the adoption of customer orientation is positively related to the profitability of both Japanese and American entrepreneurial firms, although the effect is stronger in the US. It is also found that the adoption of technology orientation is negatively related to the profitability of both Japanese and American firms, although the effect is less negative in Japan. Finally, it is found that the adoption of cost orientation does not have an impact on the profitability of either Japanese or American entrepreneurial firms.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to examine how founders of entrepreneurial firms use their personal disposition to shape the strategic orientation of their firm.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Marco Minciullo

This chapter investigates the impact of coordination and control mechanisms on the orientation to performances, looking at the relation between Corporate Foundations and…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter investigates the impact of coordination and control mechanisms on the orientation to performances, looking at the relation between Corporate Foundations and their Founder Firms. The research starts from the consideration that the relationship between CFs and Founder Firms can be considered similar to the relationship between headquarter and subsidiaries in large corporations, as the ties are very strong and significant.

Methodology/approach

In order to address the impact of control and coordination mechanisms on CFs’ orientation to performance, we managed a survey addressed to 188 CFs from six European countries, representing the most significant context for corporate philanthropy in Europe.

Findings

The results of a linear regression show that only selected mechanisms are effective for boosting CFs’ orientation to performance, and that these tools must be adapted to the specific nature of the CFs.

Research implications

The study can help Founder Firms to identify the more effective mechanisms to improve the performance of the CFs they support, in order to ensure the possibility for both the parties to pursue the shared value creation.

Originality/value

The research has put in evidence that CFs must be explored taking into consideration their close tie to Founder Firm, which differentiates them from other interdependent foundations.

Details

Governance and Performance in Public and Non-Profit Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-107-4

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Marco Minciullo and Matteo Pedrini

This article aims at investigating knowledge transfer and exchange (KTE) between founder firms and corporate foundations (CFs), looking at mechanisms able to enhance CFs…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims at investigating knowledge transfer and exchange (KTE) between founder firms and corporate foundations (CFs), looking at mechanisms able to enhance CFs’ orientation of effectiveness.

Methodology/approach

We analyze 50 questionnaires collected through a survey of CFs based in Italy (redemption of 42.7% of the total). We use a number of regressions to verify the change of explained variance moving from a basic model with control variables (enter method) and a model including KTE mechanisms with an impact on orientation to effectiveness (stepwise method).

Findings

The analysis produced a model which underlines the influence of knowledge transfer mechanisms in stimulating orientation to effectiveness. The adoption of specific knowledge transfer mechanisms by founder firms can have a significant influence on how CFs manage their effectiveness. Three mechanisms emerge from the study as elements with a positive impact.

Practical implication

The results apply to nonprofit or public bodies, especially if we consider partnerships or organizational networks. The individuated criteria for selecting a positive KTE could drive similar choices of other nonprofit bodies.

Social implication

The study individuates a set of practices that are potentially able to influence positively the orientation to effectiveness of CFs, and the capacity to perform their activities and respond to social needs more successfully.

Originality/value

This research considers CFs as founder firms’ subsidiaries, with a growing strategic importance. This research reveals how KTE mechanisms can foster the development of orientation to effectiveness if implying interaction, firms’ commitment, autonomy, and alignment with the firms’ strategy and CFs’ purposes.

Details

Mechanisms, Roles and Consequences of Governance: Emerging Issues
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-706-1

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Leif Brändle, Stephan Golla and Andreas Kuckertz

Entrepreneurial orientation (EO) has been viewed almost exclusively through the lens of profit-driven firms. However, individuals engage in entrepreneurship not only for…

Abstract

Purpose

Entrepreneurial orientation (EO) has been viewed almost exclusively through the lens of profit-driven firms. However, individuals engage in entrepreneurship not only for economic reasons but also to enrich a community or to advance society. Drawing on upper echelons theory, the purpose of this paper is to address this issue by proposing that founders’ social identities shape the strategic choices of their ventures.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the data from 318 founders in the early stages of their entrepreneurial activity, the study applies partial least squares structural equation modeling to empirically test whether founders’ social identities influence their ventures’ EO.

Findings

The findings of the current research show that founders whose dominant purpose is the creation of value for others are more likely to launch ventures oriented toward innovation. On the other hand, ventures of founders driven by economic self-interest accept more risk, which leads to higher performance outcomes on the enterprise, community and societal levels.

Originality/value

The study enhances the EO discussion by adding social identity theory as a way to explain different levels of EO in firms and answers the call for more diversity in EO–performance measurement by applying specific outcomes on the enterprise, community and societal levels to investigate whether a firm’s EO leads to the desired outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Thilo A. Mueller and Hans Georg Gemünden

Developments in the software industry have shown the need for sustainable and effective management strategies, especially for new ventures. Entrepreneurship literature…

Abstract

Purpose

Developments in the software industry have shown the need for sustainable and effective management strategies, especially for new ventures. Entrepreneurship literature suggests marketing to be one of the pivotal predictors of business performance. Previous empirical studies have shown the importance of social interaction and team work quality for new venture performance. The purpose of this paper is to apply founder team interaction quality (IQ), and the customer and competitor orientation concept of marketing research to new software venture performance.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study using a fully standardized questionnaire was conducted in 101 young software ventures. Two founders in each company filled out the questionnaire separately allowing superior tests for reliability and validity of the research framework.

Findings

The results show team IQ to be a powerful predictor of both customer orientation and competitor orientation. Furthermore, a positive, linear relationship between competitor orientation and technological performance has been found. There is a curvilinear U‐shaped relationship between customer orientation and all examined success dimensions, i.e. economic, market and technological success.

Originality/value

Based on a theoretical research framework and a comprehensive empirical study, the paper contributes to a limited body of research and provides insight for managers of young ventures in the nature of teamwork and IQ and its effects on market orientation and company performance.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Fariss‐Terry Mousa and William Wales

This paper aims to explore the effects of entrepreneurial orientation (EO) on firm survival and examine whether founder chief executive officers (CEOs) are more effective…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the effects of entrepreneurial orientation (EO) on firm survival and examine whether founder chief executive officers (CEOs) are more effective than other types of managers at utilizing entrepreneurial orientation at initial public offerings (IPOs).

Design/methodology/approach

Using survival analysis the authors investigate the effects of EO on firm survival as well as the moderating role of founder CEOs.

Findings

The results suggest that EO increases post‐IPO survival. Further, founder‐CEOs moderate the EO‐survival relationship.

Originality/value

The paper shows that entrepreneurial orientation enhances long‐term survival in IPO firms. Survival is an important, though generally overlooked consideration in EO research. The paper also concludes that firms with founder CEOs are more likely to value and implement EO. Finally, the paper addresses calls for greater use of secondary measures of EO.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Sven M. Laudien and Birgit Daxböck

This paper aims to challenge the up to now mainly product-centered view on international new ventures by analyzing the influence of service orientation on new venture…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to challenge the up to now mainly product-centered view on international new ventures by analyzing the influence of service orientation on new venture internationalization behavior. It especially focuses on the utilization of specific market entry modes as a result of a growing service orientation.

Design/methodology/approach

Newness and complexity of the topic call for a qualitative-empirical research approach. Therefore, the paper is based on an in-depth multiple-case study of six international new ventures operating in fashion and lifestyle industry.

Findings

This paper shows that service-oriented international new ventures make use of different market entry modes at the same time. Service-related capabilities allow them to especially use cooperative market entry modes to fuel lacking market knowledge and thus to overcome resource constraints in value creation processes.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to a more holistic understanding of international new ventures, as it provides empirical evidence for the importance of service-related aspects in new venture internationalization. Furthermore, the paper extends international new venture research by not only considering an early international market entry but also other aspects of internationalization such as the type of offerings or the preferred market entry modes.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 6000