Search results

1 – 10 of over 4000
Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2018

Jiandong Chen, Yinyin Wu, Chong Xu, Malin Song and Xin Liu

Non-fossil fuels are receiving increasing attention within the context of addressing global climate challenges. Based on a review of non-fossil fuel consumption in major…

Abstract

Purpose

Non-fossil fuels are receiving increasing attention within the context of addressing global climate challenges. Based on a review of non-fossil fuel consumption in major countries worldwide from 1985 to 2015, the purpose of this paper is to analyze trends for global non-fossil fuel consumption, share of fuel consumption and inequality.

Design/methodology/approach

The similarities were obtained between the logarithmic mean divisia index and the mean-rate-of-change index decomposition analysis methods, and a method was proposed for complete decomposition of the incremental Gini coefficient.

Findings

Empirical analysis showed that: global non-fossil fuel consumption accounts for a small share of the total energy consumption, but presents an increasing trend; the level of global non-fossil fuel consumption inequality is high but has gradually declined, which is mainly attributed to the concentration effect; inequality in global non-fossil fuel consumption is mainly due to the difference between nuclear power and hydropower consumption, but the contributions of nuclear power and hydropower to per capita non-fossil fuel consumption are declining; and population has the greatest influence on global non-fossil fuel consumption during the sampling period.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this study is its analysis of global non-fossil fuel consumption trends, disparities and driving factors. In addition, a general formula for complete index decomposition is proposed and the incremental Gini coefficient is wholly decomposed.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 57 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Christopher Todd Beer

This research uses the social science perspectives of institutions, ecological modernization and social movements to analyze the rationale used by the early-adopting…

Abstract

Purpose

This research uses the social science perspectives of institutions, ecological modernization and social movements to analyze the rationale used by the early-adopting universities of fossil fuel divestment in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

Through analysis of qualitative data from interviews with key actors at the universities that divested their endowments from fossil fuels, the paper examines how institutions navigate competing logics and frame their rationale.

Findings

The results show that while many institutions relied on ecological values embedded in their missions to justify their decision to divest, many also continued to embrace an altered version of market logic.

Research limitations/implications

This research is primarily limited by its small population size. If the number of adoptees increases in the future, quantitative analysis should look for statistically robust trends.

Practical implications

The implications of this research are that we can expect more universities to commit to divesting from fossil fuels if their mission statements provide them with cultural material to rationalize the decision, but also expect them to couch the decision in continued goals and concerns for fiduciary responsibility and the subsequent growth of their endowment.

Social implications

Social actors engaged in the fossil fuel divestment campaign may take this research and conclude that they need to build their arguments around the existing institutional logics and cultural identity.

Originality/value

This paper contributes original primary data documenting how institutional actors confront dominant logics using both a mixture of internal cultural identity and the reframing of the legitimated market logics.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 November 2012

Roger L. Burritt and Stefan Schaltegger

The purpose of this paper is to explore the scope of applications and benefits of sustainability accounting for the production and industrial use of biomass as an energy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the scope of applications and benefits of sustainability accounting for the production and industrial use of biomass as an energy source and substitute for fossilfuel use. As environmental degradation and unacceptable social impacts not only increase from the production and use of fossilfuel based energy, but also from alternative energy sources, the monitoring, controlling and measuring of the (un‐)sustainability of alternative energy production and use emerges as an area in critical need of research.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a review of the issues surrounding the accounting for the (un‐)sustainability of industrial biomass production and use, considering what biomass is, the current and forecast importance of industrial biomass, different approaches to its production, and the subsequent measurement and monitoring of its potential (un‐)sustainability.

Findings

The paper finds that it is insufficient to conclude in general terms, as is often done or assumed in policy documents and statements, that industrial production and use of biomass is sustainable (or unsustainable) and that accounting for biomass must recognise the broader ecological and social system of which the production and use form a part. A further finding of the paper is that from agricultural or industrial production of biomass through to consumption and industrial use of biomass, the accounting issues surrounding biomass production and use are essential to determining its (un‐)sustainability.

Originality/value

The paper provides an overview of the importance of and problems with the production of biomass for industrial use, and related sustainability issues. It discusses possibilities for and limitations of accounting to address these sustainability issues as well as the need for and the challenges in measuring the (un‐)sustainability of biomass production for industrial use and the accounting for sustainability improvements.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2020

Ronald C. Kramer and Rob White

This chapter examines SDG 13 which deals with efforts to combat climate change. The chapter begins by outlining the targets related to this goal, the trend towards…

Abstract

This chapter examines SDG 13 which deals with efforts to combat climate change. The chapter begins by outlining the targets related to this goal, the trend towards increased heating of the planet and failures to curtail carbon emissions. This is framed using criminological concepts such as state-corporate crime and carbon criminality. The major concern of the rest of the chapter is to outline a climate action plan. As part of this, it discusses a range of initiatives currently underway intended to pressure governments to take more concerted action around climate change. These include activist interventions and climate litigation. The chapter concludes by exploring the possibilities and obligations of global community action to address the most important issue of our era.

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Crime, Justice and Sustainable Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-355-5

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 July 2018

Jiaping Xie, Yu Xia, Ling Liang, Weisi Zhang and Minghong Shi

To promote the development of renewable energy, the Chinese Government adopts the policy of Feed-in Tariff and subsidy. However, the high purchase price and the…

Abstract

Purpose

To promote the development of renewable energy, the Chinese Government adopts the policy of Feed-in Tariff and subsidy. However, the high purchase price and the intermittence limit the development of renewable energy source electricity (RES-E). The purpose of this paper is to discuss the pricing strategy for system operators to stimulate the development of the RES-E industry under the scenario of uncertain supply and demand.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors establish a two-echelon supply chain investment model led by a power grid operator considering the uncertainties in both demand and supply, and study the impact of the power purchase price designed by a system operator using Stackelberg’s model.

Findings

There is an optimal capacity for RES-E generators, that is, independent of the market demand. Besides, the optimal order of grid operators is independent of the uncertain RES-E supply and the purchase price of fossil fuel. By properly setting the purchase prices, the system operator can stimulate the capacity investment in renewable energy. Finally, increasing the punishment in power shortage can stimulate the capacity investment in RES-E under certain conditions.

Practical implications

The result of this paper can mitigate the phenomenon of power abandonment in the RES-E industry and promote the grid integration of RES-E.

Originality/value

Both uncertain demand and supply are considered in this paper. A heuristic algorithm is provided to compute the optimal purchase price combination.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 118 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 4 September 2015

Fahrettin Okcabol and Joan Hoffman

There is growing apprehension about climate change and the role played by fossil fuels. Exploration of renewable sources of energy as an alternative to fossil fuels

Abstract

There is growing apprehension about climate change and the role played by fossil fuels. Exploration of renewable sources of energy as an alternative to fossil fuels reveals that there is no path forward toward a true green economy that does not have negative environmental side effects. Thus, the improvement of managerial and financial accounting to provide more environmental information and accountability by governmental and nongovernmental institutions is increasingly important in guiding us toward wiser choices. Since the 1970s, the increasing concerns about the environment in the United States have led to improved regulation and more comprehensive environmental reporting requirements and accounting standards. Also, global institutions have been created to foster voluntary reporting of both direct and indirect environmental impacts of their activities by institutions. However, evidence suggests that, while some large global firms have found it useful to engage in sustainability reporting throughout their operations, in general, the US organizational environmental reporting is not strong and is oriented toward the legal minimum when present. If we are to take account of the many direct and indirect ways in which our production choices affect our environment, then our institutions need to play a larger role in informing our choices. Both the Environmental Managerial Accounting Initiative and an enhanced balanced scorecard approach are recommended as frameworks for future efforts; public and private institutions must also include life cycle analysis in decision-making systems in order to enhance their ability to help achieve sustainable economic progress.

Details

Sustainability and Governance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-654-6

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Handbook of Transport and the Environment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-080-44103-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

Abdeltif El Ouahrani, Joaquin Molero Mesa and Abderrahmane Merzouki

This paper aims to highlight the drivers and trends of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuels of 21 Mediterranean countries, and suggest some policy…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight the drivers and trends of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuels of 21 Mediterranean countries, and suggest some policy recommendations to help mitigate them and fostering energy partnership within the studied area.

Design/methodology/approach

Simplified Kaya identity was used to analyse the drivers and trends of CO2 emission from fossil fuels. Data used were retrieved from the US Energy Information Administration and Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Centre. The analysis considers Northern rim countries and Southern‐Eastern rim countries (SERCs) as separate groups, as well as all together.

Findings

The total fossil fuel emissions between 1980 and 2005, the emissions growth rate in 1980s, 1990s, and 2000‐2006 were assessed. The findings put emphasis on the drivers and trends of fuel emissions considering per capita emission, gross domestic product and carbon intensity.

Originality/value

Despite their low contribution to global anthropogenic CO2 emissions (∼7 percent), the growing energy demands in the Mediterranean countries – especially in the SERCs – shows that there is an urgent and tremendous effort that needs to be addressed at national and regional levels in order to slow down the increasing emissions without impacting the development growth. This paper puts special emphasis on the importance of regional energy and climate‐related frameworks as a systematic approach to endure the impacts of climate change through sustainable ways.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 July 2009

Weert Canzler and Andreas Knie

The purpose of this paper is to give an answer to the questions whether China can make the quantum leap in automotive technology from engines that burn fossilfuel to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to give an answer to the questions whether China can make the quantum leap in automotive technology from engines that burn fossilfuel to those that do not and whether China will take an “alternative Asian path of development.”

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a sociological approach to prove potential technical innovations reflecting the social conditions of radical innovations like post‐fossil mobility concepts.

Findings

Innovations like a post‐fossil car concept consist of more than new technical infrastructures and mere imitations, they require decentralized spaces for incubation and experimentation. Translated into conditions governing the policy milieu, that need means that potential promoters of innovations need fundamental political freedoms, equality before the law, legal certainty, and the advancement and protection of personal rights vis‐à‐vis the state. In a sociological perspective, China needs social modernization in the sense of differentiation, individualization, and internalization of external constraints.

Research limitations/implications

This paper reflects the opportunities and restrictions of radical change in car technology in china. It does not give evidence for the future of conventional mass motorization as the continuance of the state of the art in car technologies.

Practical implications

This paper implies – as a practical consequence – that the established car industry in the triad is furthermore responsible for progress in car and motor concepts being more energy efficient and less dependent from oil.

Originality/value

The original contribution of this paper is that it connects the technical debate on the future of cars and their drive system with the discussion of social and political terms of collective capacity of radical innovations.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 36 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 October 2020

Anderson A., Karthikeyan A., Ramesh Kumar C., Ramachandran S. and Praveenkumar T.R.

The purpose of this study is to predict the performance and emission characteristics of micro gas turbine engines powered by alternate fuels. The micro gas turbine engine…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to predict the performance and emission characteristics of micro gas turbine engines powered by alternate fuels. The micro gas turbine engine performance, combustion and emission characteristics are analyzed for the jet fuel with different additives.

Design/methodology/approach

The experimental investigation was carried out with Jet A-1 fuel on the gas turbine engines at different load conditions. The primary blends of the Jet A-1 fuels are from canola and solid waste pyrolysis oil. Then the ultrasonication of highly concentrated multiwall carbon nanotubes is carried with the primary blends of canola (Jet-A fuel 70%, canola 20% and 10% ethanol) and P20E (Jet-A 70% fuel, 20% PO and 10% ethanol).

Findings

The consumption of the fuel is appreciable with the blends at a very high static thrust. The 39% reduction in thrust specific fuel consumption associated with a 32% enhance in static thrust with P20E blend among different fuel blends. Moreover, due to the increase in ethanol concentration in the blends PO20E and C20E lead to a 22% rise in thermal efficiency and a 9% increase in higher oxygen content is observed.

Practical implications

The gas turbine engine emits very low emission of gases such as CO, CO2 and NOx by using the fuel blends, which typically reduces the fossil fuel usage limits with reduced pollutants.

Originality/value

The emission of the gas turbine engines is further optimized with the addition of hydrogen in Jet-A fuel. That is leading to high specific fuel exergy and owing to the lower carbon content in the hydrogen fuel when compared with that of the fossil fuels used in gas turbine engines. Therefore, the usage of hydrogen with nanofluids was so promising based on the results obtained for replacing fossil fuels.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 93 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1748-8842

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 4000