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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Alberto Yohananoff

The purpose of this paper was to assess whether the criteria that have been developed by mental health professionals to judge the quality of child custody reports matches…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to assess whether the criteria that have been developed by mental health professionals to judge the quality of child custody reports matches the criteria employed by members of the legal profession.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the literature on the standards that have been developed to assess the quality of child custody reports and compare it to the criteria used by attorneys and judges.

Findings

The broad criteria used by mental health professionals in assessing the quality of child custody reports mostly matches those employed by judges and attorneys.

Research limitations/implications

There is limited research that focusses on a detailed, qualitative analysis of each component of a child custody report.

Practical implications

Is it essential that a qualitative analysis of child custody reports be performed because it would impact on how professional approach such evaluations.

Originality/value

Having research focussing on a detailed qualitative analysis of child custody evaluations may enhance the quality of such products.

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Maria Karyda, Evangelia Mitrou and Gerald Quirchmayr

This paper seeks to provide an overview of the major technical, organizational and legal issues pertaining to the outsourcing of IS/IT security services.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to provide an overview of the major technical, organizational and legal issues pertaining to the outsourcing of IS/IT security services.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a combined socio‐technical approach to explore the different aspects of IS/IT security outsourcing and suggests a framework for accommodating security and privacy requirements that arise in outsourcing arrangements.

Findings

Data protection requirements are a decisive factor for IS/IT security outsourcing, not only because they pose restrictions to management, but also because security and privacy concerns are commonly cited among the most important concerns prohibiting organizations from IS/IT outsourcing. New emerging trends such as outsourcing in third countries, pose significant new issues, with regard to meeting data protection requirements.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates the reasons for which the outsourcing of IS/IT security needs to be examined under a different perspective from traditional IS/IT outsourcing. It focuses on the specific issue of personal data protection requirements that must be accommodated, according to the European Union directive.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Alastair Irons

To explore the meaning, methods and techniques associated with the subject of computer forensics and consider the implications of computer forensics for records managers

Abstract

Purpose

To explore the meaning, methods and techniques associated with the subject of computer forensics and consider the implications of computer forensics for records managers and recordkeeping.

Design/methodology/approach

Critically analyses the principles of computer forensics in the context of records characteristics – authenticity, reliability, integrity and usability – and the UK Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) principles and procedures for the collection of digital evidence.

Findings

The disciplines of records management and computer forensics are potentially mutually compatible. Computer forensics allows for identification of incidents, gathering of evidence, analysis of evidence and potentially recovery of records. Records managers can utilise computer forensics principles to positively enhance records management and have valuable knowledge and expertise to share with their computer forensics colleagues; e.g. metadata expertise, functional requirements for electronic records management, recordkeeping systems design and implementation methodologies, digital preservation and retention management.

Research limitations/implications

Discusses how computer forensics can be used to highlight inadequate recordkeeping and provide a different perspective on records management based on an analysis of principles and concepts rather than empirical data.

Practical implications

Highlights the need for records managers to understand computer forensics and computer forensic scientists to understand recordkeeping to support better records management in the electronic environment; raises the implications for educators, trainers and professional societies.

Originality/value

Very little has been published on the discussion of the potential implications of computer forensics for records managers or how computer forensics can enhance the records management discipline; this paper addresses the gap.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 28 May 2021

Krystal Hans and Kylie Parrotta

Purpose: The authors attempt to capture new forensic science students’ pre-conceptions of the field and their assessment of competencies. Methodology: The authors surveyed…

Abstract

Purpose: The authors attempt to capture new forensic science students’ pre-conceptions of the field and their assessment of competencies. Methodology: The authors surveyed students at a Historically Black College and University and a Primarily White Institution on their viewership of crime and forensic TV shows and measured their competencies in a range of forensic science skills at the start and end of the semester, along with having students capture errors and evidence from an episode of CSI Las Vegas. Findings: Students who were viewers of crime series with and without prior forensics coursework over evaluated their level of preparedness at the start of the semester, often ranking themselves as moderately or well prepared in blood spatter analysis, fingerprinting, bodily fluid, and hair/fiber collection. Research limitations: The authors relied on a convenience sample of forensic science courses, and their comparison of student learning was disrupted by COVID-19. Originality: The authors examine student concerns with working at crime scenes and reflections on their abilities to succeed in the field. The authors discuss the need for incorporating media literacy, content warnings, and emotional socialization and professional development into forensic science curricula to better equip and prepare students for careers as crime scene investigators and forensic analysts.

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2020

R.I. Ferguson, Karen Renaud, Sara Wilford and Alastair Irons

Cyber-enabled crimes are on the increase, and law enforcement has had to expand many of their detecting activities into the digital domain. As such, the field of digital…

Abstract

Purpose

Cyber-enabled crimes are on the increase, and law enforcement has had to expand many of their detecting activities into the digital domain. As such, the field of digital forensics has become far more sophisticated over the years and is now able to uncover even more evidence that can be used to support prosecution of cyber criminals in a court of law. Governments, too, have embraced the ability to track suspicious individuals in the online world. Forensics investigators are driven to gather data exhaustively, being under pressure to provide law enforcement with sufficient evidence to secure a conviction.

Yet, there are concerns about the ethics and justice of untrammeled investigations on a number of levels. On an organizational level, unconstrained investigations could interfere with, and damage, the organization's right to control the disclosure of their intellectual capital. On an individual level, those being investigated could easily have their legal privacy rights violated by forensics investigations. On a societal level, there might be a sense of injustice at the perceived inequality of current practice in this domain.

This paper argues the need for a practical, ethically grounded approach to digital forensic investigations, one that acknowledges and respects the privacy rights of individuals and the intellectual capital disclosure rights of organizations, as well as acknowledging the needs of law enforcement. The paper derives a set of ethical guidelines, and then maps these onto a forensics investigation framework. The framework to expert review in two stages is subjected, refining the framework after each stage. The paper concludes by proposing the refined ethically grounded digital forensics investigation framework. The treatise is primarily UK based, but the concepts presented here have international relevance and applicability.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the lens of justice theory is used to explore the tension that exists between the needs of digital forensic investigations into cybercrimes on the one hand, and, on the other, individuals' rights to privacy and organizations' rights to control intellectual capital disclosure.

Findings

The investigation revealed a potential inequality between the practices of digital forensics investigators and the rights of other stakeholders. That being so, the need for a more ethically informed approach to digital forensics investigations, as a remedy, is highlighted and a framework proposed to provide this.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed ethically informed framework for guiding digital forensics investigations suggests a way of re-establishing the equality of the stakeholders in this arena, and ensuring that the potential for a sense of injustice is reduced.

Originality/value

Justice theory is used to highlight the difficulties in squaring the circle between the rights and expectations of all stakeholders in the digital forensics arena. The outcome is the forensics investigation guideline, PRECEpt: Privacy-Respecting EthiCal framEwork, which provides the basis for a re-aligning of the balance between the requirements and expectations of digital forensic investigators on the one hand, and individual and organizational expectations and rights, on the other.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Corinne Rogers

This paper aims to explore a new model of “record” that maps traditional attributes of a record onto a technical decomposition of digital records. It compares the core…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore a new model of “record” that maps traditional attributes of a record onto a technical decomposition of digital records. It compares the core characteristics necessary to call a digital object a “record” in terms of diplomatics or “evidence” in terms of digital forensics. It then isolates three layers of abstraction: the conceptual, the logical and the physical. By identifying the essential elements of a record at each layer of abstraction, a diplomatics of digital records can be proposed.

Design/methodology/approach

Digital diplomatics, a research outcome of the International Research on Permanent Authentic Records in Electronic Systems (InterPARES) project, gives archivists a methodology for analyzing the identity and integrity of digital records in electronic systems and thereby assessing their authenticity (Duranti and Preston, 2008; Duranti, 2005) and tracing their provenance.

Findings

Digital records consist of user-generated data (content), system-generated metadata identifying source and location, application-generated metadata managing the look and performance of the record (e.g., native file format), application-generated metadata describing the data (e.g., file system metadata OS), and user-generated metadata describing the data. Digital diplomatics, based on a foundation of traditional diplomatic principles, can help identify digital records through their metadata and determine what metadata needs to be captured, managed and preserved.

Originality/value

The value and originality of this paper is in the application of diplomatic principles to a deconstructed, technical view of digital records through functional metadata for assessing the identity and authenticity of digital records.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

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Article
Publication date: 7 May 2021

Dana Wilson-Kovacs

In-depth knowledge about specific national approaches to using digital evidence in investigations is scarce. A clearer insight into the organisational barriers and…

Abstract

Purpose

In-depth knowledge about specific national approaches to using digital evidence in investigations is scarce. A clearer insight into the organisational barriers and professional challenges experienced, alongside a more detailed picture of how digital evidence can help police investigations are required to empirically substantiate claims about how digital technologies are changing the face of criminal investigations. The paper aims to focus on the introduction of digital media investigators to support investigating officers with the collection and interpretation of digital evidence.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on ethnographic and interview data collected as part of an Economic and Social Research Council-funded project on the application of digital forensics expertise in policing in England and Wales, this paper examines the changing face of investigations in relation to escalating digital demand.

Findings

The analysis presents the national and regional organisational parameters of deploying digital expertise in criminal investigation and examines some of the challenges of being a digital media investigator (DMI). Through testimonies from DMIs, digital forensic practitioners, investigating and senior officers and forensic managers, the analysis explores the organisational tensions in the collection, processing, interpretation and use of information from digital devices for evidential purposes.

Research limitations/implications

The paper offers an empirical basis for the comparative study of how the DMI role has been implemented by law enforcement agencies and its fit within broader institutional considerations and processes.

Practical implications

The development of the DMI role has raised questions about the supply of digital expertise, especially to volume crime investigations, and tensions around occupational divisions between scientific and operational units.

Social implications

The findings show that while the introduction of the DMI role was much needed, the development of this valuable provision within each force and the resources available require sustained and coordinated support to protect these professionals and retain their skills.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the growing sociological and criminological literature with an ethnographically based perspective into the organisational and occupational tensions in the identification and processing of digital evidence in England and Wales.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2013

Jeanette Van Akkeren, Sherrena Buckby and Kim MacKenzie

The aim of the study is to identify the latest trends in accounting forensic work in Australia by examining how accounting firms that specialise in forensic services meet…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the study is to identify the latest trends in accounting forensic work in Australia by examining how accounting firms that specialise in forensic services meet the needs of their clients, and to inform universities on the appropriate curricula to ensure the knowledge and skills of future graduates meet industry expectations.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodological approach taken in this study was exploratory, and qualitative semi‐structured interviews were the primary data collection instrument used.

Findings

Findings from 32 interviews with Australian practising forensic professionals suggest that these services are broad and complex. Opinions differ widely on the best way forward for this area of the accounting profession. Both work‐based and personal attributes required by practising forensic professionals together with the wide range of complex services offered in Australia are presented in a posited model, providing a unique contribution to international forensic accounting literature. Forensic services firms require strong work‐based skills such as oral and written communication skills, technology and analytical skills, in addition to an accounting qualification, as part of their under‐graduate or post‐graduate degrees.

Practical implications

Perceptions were also that graduates require strong interpersonal skills, enthusiasm, intelligence and the ability to work independently and although this has been reported in the literature previously, findings from this study suggest there is still a deficiency in forensic accounting graduates skill set, particularly in relation to oral and written communication. The lack of an Australian‐based forensic accounting certification was also raised.

Originality/value

Both work‐based skills and personal attributes are presented in a posited model of the Australian forensic accountant, providing a unique contribution to international forensic accounting literature.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2020

Tobias Wasser, Saksham Chandra and Katherine Michaelsen

The purpose of this paper is to review the impact of a new, brief forensic rotation for general psychiatry residents on the variety of residents’ forensic exposures.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the impact of a new, brief forensic rotation for general psychiatry residents on the variety of residents’ forensic exposures.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors surveyed residents who trained before and after the implementation of the new rotation to assess the impact of the rotation on the residents’ forensic experiences during training across a variety of domains.

Findings

Even in a highly clinical forensic setting, residents participating in the required rotation reported significantly greater variety of forensic experiences than those who had not completed the required rotation, including types of settings and assessments, Rotation completers reported greater exposure to various types of settings and assessments, and courtroom-related experiences, as well as the overall number of forensic exposures. The two groups did not differ in their forensic exposures in general psychiatry settings, civil-forensic evaluations or diverse forensic populations. Secondary analyses showed that increased exposure to court-based experiences and multiple forensic settings was associated with forensic fellowship interest.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates that a brief, mandatory forensic clinical rotation may increase residents’ exposure to forensic settings, assessments and courtroom-related experiences and that increased exposure to courtroom-based experiences in particular may increase interest in forensic fellowship. While not surprising, the results demonstrate that residents were not otherwise having these forensic experiences and that even time-limited forensic rotations can enhance the breadth of residents’ forensic exposures. Further, the rotation achieved these outcomes without using typical forensic sites but instead highly clinical sites, which may be particularly encouraging to residency programs without ready access to classic forensic rotation sites. This study contributes to the small but expanding body of the literature describing the value of increasing psychiatry residents’ training in clinical forensic psychiatry.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 3 March 2021

Alan Rea, Kaitlin Marshall and Dan Farrell

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to develop, test and validate a set of dimensions that can verify whether any specific online survey tool can be effectively…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to develop, test and validate a set of dimensions that can verify whether any specific online survey tool can be effectively developed and deployed; second, to provide a framework and working topology for web-based survey tool selection.

Design/methodology/approach

A panel comprised of five experts determined the validity of the proposed dimensions the authors compiled from extensive feature research of the top online survey software identified by Alexa and Datanyze, which allows for web survey data to be pulled in a customizable fashion over a selected period of time. The validated dimensions were then ranked via a paper survey (n = 98) in a controlled environment using a 9-point Likert scale.

Findings

There was no strong correlation between highest-ranked dimensions and the market share and use of a particular online survey tool. However, overall dimension ranking dominance did predict an online survey tool obtaining higher market implementation and use. In addition, the influence of business roles on dimension weights should be considered when selecting survey software. Finally, two additional dimensions not prevalent in existing research – data analysis and technical support – must be considered in survey tool selection.

Practical implications

Online survey tools are increasingly supplementing or replacing random telephone-based opinion and polling surveys for data collection on important social issues, political candidacies, etc. Representative samples yielding the most accurate results are more easily obtained via mixed-mode methods that incorporate online survey tools.

Originality/value

The paper's findings suggest which dimensions must be present for widespread acceptance and implementation of a successful web-based online survey tool. Organizations must be able to assess a particular survey tool's viability for their specific purposes. The dimensions presented here can be developed into an effective adoption heuristic to meet an organization's particular requirements. Findings suggest that when evaluating survey software, one must remain cognizant of the various business roles associated with survey software to better account for decision-maker tendencies. For example, managers place greater emphasis on overall cost whereas developers may value survey creation and integration features.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

Keywords

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