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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Max Rutherford and Sean Duggan

Forensic mental health services play an important role in providing treatment and accommodation for people diverted from prison or the courts who require secure and…

Abstract

Forensic mental health services play an important role in providing treatment and accommodation for people diverted from prison or the courts who require secure and specialist mental health treatment. There are more than 3,500 people in medium and high‐secure hospitals who have been directed there by the courts or prison system, and nearly 1,000 new admissions are received each year. Yet, the facts and figures relating to these services are patchy and not widely published. This paper builds on an earlier statistical briefing produced by the Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health in 2007, and seeks to provide an up‐to‐date and improved understanding of this area of service provision by presenting the most recent data and figures.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2015

Kenneth MacMahon and Ricky McClements

There is a general consensus that healthcare for people with intellectual disabilities should be provided by multi-disciplinary teams. Within a forensic setting…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a general consensus that healthcare for people with intellectual disabilities should be provided by multi-disciplinary teams. Within a forensic setting, recommendations are often made for separate or “parallel” forensic teams, operating independently of generic mental health or intellectual disability teams. An alternative to this model is an “integrated” service, where specialist forensic clinicians work within the general intellectual disability service, to provide support for clients with forensic needs. For clients with intellectual disabilities and forensic needs, there may be advantages to providing access to a wider multi-disciplinary team, through the application of an integrated model. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the working of an integrated forensic service within a learning disability team, to identify positive aspects of this model, and how potential shortcomings may be overcome.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature review, description of service outline with case example.

Findings

Although some studies have compared parallel and integrated forensic models within mental health services, there are no evaluations that compare models of forensic services for individuals with intellectual disabilities. However, specific advantages of an integrated model may include availability of multi-disciplinary clinicians, development of forensic skills across wider groups of clinicians, reduction in stigma and avoidance of delay in transfer of care between services. In addition, in areas with smaller populations, parallel services may not be feasible due to low case numbers.

Originality/value

There has been no formal evaluation of parallel vs integrated forensic services within an intellectual disability setting. However, the authors describe a fully integrated service and suggest means by which the potential shortcomings of an integrated model may be overcome.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 6 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2013

Jeanette Van Akkeren, Sherrena Buckby and Kim MacKenzie

The aim of the study is to identify the latest trends in accounting forensic work in Australia by examining how accounting firms that specialise in forensic services meet…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the study is to identify the latest trends in accounting forensic work in Australia by examining how accounting firms that specialise in forensic services meet the needs of their clients, and to inform universities on the appropriate curricula to ensure the knowledge and skills of future graduates meet industry expectations.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodological approach taken in this study was exploratory, and qualitative semi‐structured interviews were the primary data collection instrument used.

Findings

Findings from 32 interviews with Australian practising forensic professionals suggest that these services are broad and complex. Opinions differ widely on the best way forward for this area of the accounting profession. Both work‐based and personal attributes required by practising forensic professionals together with the wide range of complex services offered in Australia are presented in a posited model, providing a unique contribution to international forensic accounting literature. Forensic services firms require strong work‐based skills such as oral and written communication skills, technology and analytical skills, in addition to an accounting qualification, as part of their under‐graduate or post‐graduate degrees.

Practical implications

Perceptions were also that graduates require strong interpersonal skills, enthusiasm, intelligence and the ability to work independently and although this has been reported in the literature previously, findings from this study suggest there is still a deficiency in forensic accounting graduates skill set, particularly in relation to oral and written communication. The lack of an Australian‐based forensic accounting certification was also raised.

Originality/value

Both work‐based skills and personal attributes are presented in a posited model of the Australian forensic accountant, providing a unique contribution to international forensic accounting literature.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2008

Palmer Orovwuje

Various attempts have been made to understand and resolve the enduring lack of cohesiveness of multidisciplinary teams (MDTs), their dysfunctional service delivery and the…

Abstract

Various attempts have been made to understand and resolve the enduring lack of cohesiveness of multidisciplinary teams (MDTs), their dysfunctional service delivery and the feelings of distress among some of the professionals who work in them. Distortions in forensic MDTs have sometimes compromised service delivery and effective risk management. Several public inquiries relating to high‐profile incidents in forensic mental health have noted the role of dysfunctional MDTs. This paper describes the philosophy, structure, functions and achievements of a forensic community MDT in Wellington, New Zealand. It explains a model of care that is adaptable, comprehensive, effective and evidence‐based. It highlights the role of the extended MDT and embedded cultural units from which care professionals work together, share a common philosophy of care and tailor their care to the needs of the individuals or populations they serve.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2021

Emily Samuels and Nicola Moran

Physical health inequalities and mortality rates are higher amongst individuals with severe mental illness (SMI), including among forensic populations, than the general…

Abstract

Purpose

Physical health inequalities and mortality rates are higher amongst individuals with severe mental illness (SMI), including among forensic populations, than the general population. This paper aims to explore the experiences of individuals accessing primary health care following discharge from secure services, and the practitioners who support them.

Design/methodology/approach

Face-to-face qualitative interviews were conducted with service users (n = 4) and mental health practitioners (n = 4) within a forensic community mental health team in one NHS Trust in England in 2019. Data were analysed using the Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis.

Findings

Four super-ordinate themes emerged: perceived importance of physical health, agency, responsibility and relationships. Service users mostly saw themselves as passive recipients of health care and prioritised their mental health over their physical health. Close working relationships meant that mental health practitioners were often the first contact for service users with any health issue and thus felt a sense of responsibility for their physical health care. Service users who did access primary care reported that consistency of professional, feeling understood and listened to without judgement or stigma were important.

Practical implications

Interventions for service users that include practicalities and strategies to facilitate independence in physical health care, and collaborative working between primary care and forensic mental health services, are encouraged.

Originality/value

This study highlights some of the unique challenges in forensics around improving physical health outcomes for individuals with SMI.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2009

Margaret Richards, Mike Doyle and Peter Cook

With permission, this paper is an edited and abridged version of an article written by Richards, Doyle and Cook for The British Journal of Forensic Practice (Richards et…

Abstract

With permission, this paper is an edited and abridged version of an article written by Richards, Doyle and Cook for The British Journal of Forensic Practice (Richards et al, 2009), detailing their literature review on family interventions in dual diagnosis and with reference to forensic mental health care. There appeared to be limited direct evidence, therefore various domains were examined and extrapolated to a forensic setting as appropriate. The review indicates the potential for positive outcomes for families following family interventions in dual diagnosis, which may be beneficial in a forensic setting in lowering risk.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2010

Shamim Dinani, Wendy Goodman, Charlotte Swift and Teresa Treasure

This paper reports on the first eight years of a community‐based forensic team for people with learning disabilities. The authors give an overview of current research and…

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386

Abstract

This paper reports on the first eight years of a community‐based forensic team for people with learning disabilities. The authors give an overview of current research and government guidance regarding the prevalence, care pathway and treatment of people with learning disabilities who offend. The role and function of the community forensic team is described and an analysis of referrals to the service is given. The authors reflect on the frustrations as well as the achievements associated with providing this service.

Details

Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0927

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2015

Helen Walker, Lesley Murphy and Vivienne Gration

The Forensic Mental Health Services Managed Care Network is described, including the School of Forensic Mental Health. The purpose of this paper is to outline background…

Abstract

Purpose

The Forensic Mental Health Services Managed Care Network is described, including the School of Forensic Mental Health. The purpose of this paper is to outline background, it details successes and challenges, focuses on links to clinical practice for Learning Disabilities (LD) service development, describes education and training, multi-disciplinary and multi-agency working and quality improvement. Findings from a small scale brief educational study undertaken in the high-secure service are included as an example of good practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Specific features relating to LD are highlighted. Comparisons are made with other managed clinical and managed care networks.

Findings

The Forensic Network has evolved over time. It has played a crucial role in shaping Scotland’s approach to Forensic Mental Health and LD. Central to its success is active involvement of key stakeholders, a multi-agency approach and collaborative working practice. Future plans include formal evaluation of impact.

Originality/value

This paper offers an interesting perspective from a forensic mental health managed care network; the existing literature is limited.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 6 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2010

Holly Corlett and Helen Miles

This study examines the implementation of the recovery model or ‘philosophy’ in a secure NHS forensic service. Twenty‐six (86.7%) staff and seventeen (70.8%) mentally…

Abstract

This study examines the implementation of the recovery model or ‘philosophy’ in a secure NHS forensic service. Twenty‐six (86.7%) staff and seventeen (70.8%) mentally disordered offenders (MDOs) were interviewed in Spring 2009 from the rehabilitation and pre‐discharges units in a medium secure forensic service in Kent, UK. Their views on recovery were measured using the Developing Recovery Enhancing Environments Measure (DREEM: Ridgeway & Press, 2001). Staff consistently rated all 24 elements of recovery as more important than the MDOs. Staff also rated the elements of recovery as better implemented, except Intimacy and Sexuality. There was a significant effect of MDOs' forensic history (restriction status and index offence type) on ratings of how well elements of recovery were implemented. Staff and MDOs rated all elements of recovery as at least moderately important (above median value). The implications of the recovery philosophy in forensic mental health services are discussed.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 3 November 2009

Margaret Richards, Mike Doyle and Peter Cook

Dual‐diagnosis strategies are developing in medium secure services in response to both government policies and clinical need and there has been a move towards integrated…

Abstract

Dual‐diagnosis strategies are developing in medium secure services in response to both government policies and clinical need and there has been a move towards integrated services for this patient group. Substance use that has been a feature of the index offence must be taken into account as much as psychosis or the offending behaviour. Treatment of dual diagnosis relies heavily on cognitive‐behavioural therapies. Relapse in either psychosis or substance use increases risk and re‐admission rates to medium security. This paper reviews the literature on family interventions in dual diagnosis and its applicability to forensic mental health inpatient services. As there appeared to be limited direct evidence, various domains were examined and extrapolated to a forensic setting as appropriate. The review indicates the potential for positive outcomes for families following family interventions in dual diagnosis, which may be beneficial in a forensic setting in lowering risk.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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