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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2011

Erin L. Davis, Kacy Lundstrom and Pamela N. Martin

This paper aims to explore both instruction librarians' attitudes on teaching and how they identify themselves as teachers. Particular attention is to be paid to teaching…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore both instruction librarians' attitudes on teaching and how they identify themselves as teachers. Particular attention is to be paid to teaching librarians' views on the effectiveness of two types of instruction models: for‐credit courses and course‐integrated library instruction.

Design/methodology/approach

To investigate librarians' attitudes towards these two models, a survey was constructed targeting librarians who teach information literacy (IL).

Findings

The results indicate that there is an important relationship between the IL instruction model employed and feelings towards campus politics, perceived effectiveness of IL models, and librarians' self‐identification as teachers.

Research limitations/implications

The survey was sent to list‐servs whose readership includes high percentages of teaching librarians and received 276 responses. This is by no means an exhaustive study. The research is intended to be exploratory and to delve more deeply than the past editorials and blog posts on the issue of comparing for‐credit and course‐integrated instruction.

Practical implications

This study can help librarians gain a better understanding of how information literacy models impact librarian perceptions of themselves and their role on campus.

Originality/value

The authors seek to transform a discussion that has occurred mostly informally (in blog posts, on list‐servs, and in conversations) into a formal investigation of librarians' attitudes towards the two models.

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Book part
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Ira Abdullah, Alisa G. Brink, C. Kevin Eller and Andrea Gouldman

We examine and compare current practices in teaching preparation in U.S. accounting, finance, management, and economics doctoral programs.

Abstract

Purpose

We examine and compare current practices in teaching preparation in U.S. accounting, finance, management, and economics doctoral programs.

Methodology/approach

We conduct an anonymous online survey of the pedagogical training practices experienced by Ph.D. students in accounting, finance, management, and economics programs in the United States.

Findings

Results indicate that accounting, finance, and management perform similarly with respect to providing doctoral students with first-hand teaching experience and requiring for-credit courses in teacher training. Accounting and management appear to utilize doctoral students as teaching assistants less than the other disciplines. A lower proportion of accounting doctoral students indicate that their program requires proof of English proficiency prior to teaching, and pedagogical mentoring is rare across disciplines. Accounting and management doctoral students feel more prepared to teach undergraduate courses compared to finance and economics students. However, all disciplines indicate a relative lack of perceived preparation to teach graduate courses.

Practical implications

This study provides empirical evidence of the current practices in pedagogical training of accounting, finance, management, and economics doctoral students.

Social implications

The results highlight several areas where accounting could possibly improve with regard to pedagogical training in doctoral programs. In particular we suggest (1) changes in the teaching evaluation process, (2) development of teaching mentorships, (3) implementing a teaching portfolio requirement, and (4) incorporation of additional methods of assisting non-native English speakers for teaching duties.

Originality/value

The study fills a gap in the literature regarding the pedagogical training in accounting doctoral programs.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-767-7

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2021

Kimberly T. Foster

Student engagement can be a difficult thing to nurture in an online, asynchronous course. This paper aims to try to encourage a student interaction in such a course, one…

Abstract

Purpose

Student engagement can be a difficult thing to nurture in an online, asynchronous course. This paper aims to try to encourage a student interaction in such a course, one that additionally is not a requirement for any major or general education plan, the author argues that using extra credit activities can increase student interaction and engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Students were given the opportunity to complete extra credit activities of several different types for a small number of extra credit points, the total of which was 5% of the students’ grade in the course. Activities included solo activities, such as playing short online information literacy games and collaborative activities that included posting and responding in a discussion forum.

Findings

The results were disappointing; only 2 out of 17 students in the sample completed extra credit activities, and those that did so would have received high grades whether or not they completed extra credit. This may be due to the low number of extra credit points available per activity, lack of motivation and other issues. Further study on this topic could help resolve these issues.

Originality/value

While the results of this study were not what was hoped for, the results and methods may be useful for other instructors of online, for-credit library classes looking for new ways to engage with students.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2011

Anna Marie Johnson, Claudene Sproles and Robert Detmering

The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper introduces and annotates periodical articles, monographs, and audiovisual material examining library instruction and information literacy.

Findings

Information about each source is provided. The paper discusses the characteristics of current scholarship, and describes sources that contain unique scholarly contributions and quality reproductions.

Originality/value

The information in the paper may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Latisha Reynolds, Samantha McClellan, Susan Finley, George Martinez and Rosalinda Hernandez Linares

This paper aims to highlight recent resources on information literacy (IL) and library instruction, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight recent resources on information literacy (IL) and library instruction, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering all library types.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations and other materials on library instruction and IL published in 2015.

Findings

This paper provides information about each source, describes the characteristics of current scholarship and highlights sources that contain either unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and IL.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Joseph A. Rosendale

The purpose of this paper is to examine hiring managers’ perceptions of massive open online courses (MOOCs) as compared to traditional degree-conferred forms of higher…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine hiring managers’ perceptions of massive open online courses (MOOCs) as compared to traditional degree-conferred forms of higher education in relation to hiring and employment decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review is presented along with a triangulated theoretical framework. Using online survey data, quantitative methods reveal findings related to the main research question: what are hiring managers’ attitudes toward MOOCs as a form of post-secondary education?

Findings

Analysis of the data reveals that hiring managers have a clear preference for traditionally educated job applicants but employer demographics, apart from organizational procedures, do not significantly impact their overall perceptions of MOOCs’ value.

Research limitations/implications

Most of the research is based on anecdotal research. Very little has been written on how to fix this problem.

Practical implications

This paper illustrates implications of MOOCs’ future development and implementation both in higher education and in the labor-force. The main implication is that MOOCs represent neither a panacea to the issues facing higher education and the American labor-force nor an alarming threat to stakeholders appreciative of the status quo.

Originality/value

This paper fills a current research gap as evidenced in the literature; employers’ perceptions of MOOC-educated job applicants when compared to traditionally educated/degree-conferred job applicants. By determining the value of MOOCs as employers pragmatically view them, stakeholder groups can better determine their future positioning of MOOC-related resources in addition to time and money allocated in MOOCs’ direction.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Book part
Publication date: 8 October 2018

David Brennan and M. Elizabeth Davidson

While the important role of information literacy instruction as a central service in academic libraries is well observed in scholarly literature, there has been little…

Abstract

While the important role of information literacy instruction as a central service in academic libraries is well observed in scholarly literature, there has been little examination of the impact of the rapid increase of instructional duties on practicing librarians, whose traditional instruction duties have expanded or whose positions have not traditionally required leading a classroom. The study in this chapter explores librarians’ perceptions of the impact that increased instruction tasks have had on their day-to-day and long-term goals, perceptions of the support they receive in performing their instructional duties, and what types of instruction training they have received throughout their career. The ways in which the addition of instruction duties for librarians have been perceived by the librarians themselves as they strive to increase support for instructional services without impacting the library’s ability to continue to perform traditional public and technical services functions is discussed as a marker of the future needs of the field and the necessity of recognizing professional strain.

Details

Challenging the “Jacks of All Trades but Masters of None” Librarian Syndrome
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-903-4

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Anna Marie Johnson, Claudene Sproles, Robert Detmering and Jessica English

The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper introduces and annotates periodical articles, monographs, and audiovisual material examining library instruction and information literacy.

Findings

Information is provided about each source, and the paper discusses the characteristics of current scholarship, and describes sources that contain unique scholarly contributions and quality reproductions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2013

Kerry Wu

Purpose – The article aims to report on the current development of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), explore the strengths and weaknesses of MOOCs, and reflect on the…

Abstract

Purpose – The article aims to report on the current development of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), explore the strengths and weaknesses of MOOCs, and reflect on the possible relationships between academic libraries and MOOCs. Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on a mix of literature review (mostly current news) and personal observations. The author discusses the unique characteristics of MOOCs, speculates on the benefits of MOOCs on higher education, and explores the impact of MOOCs on academic libraries and how librarians can respond to it. Findings – MOOCs create global learning communities that benefit both students and universities, and generate unique challenges and opportunities for academic libraries. It is recommended that librarians stay informed of the latest developments and get involved in the MOOC movement on an institutional as well as personal level. Research limitations/implications – Further research needs to be done to evaluate the efficacy of MOOCs (especially in the non‐STEM areas), to explore best practices in instruction design and pedagogy, and to rethink on strategic positioning of traditional universities vis‐à‐vis MOOCs. Practical implications – The author speculates on a possible “iTunization of information” and how that might impact academic libraries as well as the open access movement. The author also calls for academic libraries to be fully engaged in the discussion and action on their own campus related to MOOCs, and to support individual librarians' exploration of MOOCs. Originality/value – This article is based on the author's personal experience as a MOOC student and her opinions and speculations on issues related to MOOCs. The article also explores the relationship between MOOCs and academic libraries, which has not been extensively discussed in the library literature.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 41 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Robert D. Hisrich and Barra O’Cinneide

Since 1980, there has been an increasing interest in the area of innovation, entrepreneurship and economic development. While the role of educational institutions in the…

Abstract

Since 1980, there has been an increasing interest in the area of innovation, entrepreneurship and economic development. While the role of educational institutions in the entrepreneurship/new venture creation process has been recognized, little research has been done, particularly outside the US, to identify the type and extent of involvement in this area by these institutions. Looks at the activities of European third‐level educational institutions in Western Europe, Sweden, Finland, Eastern and Central Europe, and some of the Republics of the former USSR. Universities in these geographic areas were surveyed regarding the extent (if any) of their activities in four primary areas of entrepreneurship: educational programmes; training programmes; research; and enterprise formation. There were 109 of the 227 institutions from 23 countries which responded ‐ a 48 per cent response rate. Institutions were more inclined to be involved in research than education, training and actual venture creation.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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