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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Pamela Norum

The accessories, footwear and hosiery industries have always been important complements to the apparel industry. While the demand for apparel has been studied fairly…

Abstract

The accessories, footwear and hosiery industries have always been important complements to the apparel industry. While the demand for apparel has been studied fairly extensively, the demand for accessory items has been overlooked. To gain a better understanding of the demand for accessories, footwear, and hosiery, it is the purpose of this research to estimate expenditure equations for accessories, footwear and hosiery; and to profile the consumer characteristics of the purchasers and non‐purchasers of these items. An economic model of demand provides the theoretical framework. Expenditure equations are estimated using data from the 1990–91 Consumer Expenditure Survey. The results indicate that income, family size and education positively affect expenditures on accessories, footwear and hosiery while the results for age, occupation and region vary among the categories. The results have implications for producers and marketers of accessories, footwear and hosiery.

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Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1979

Christina Fulop and Tim March

Compares and contrasts the effects of the resale price maintenance abolition of 1964 emerging in different products and markets, with particular emphasis on the furniture…

Abstract

Compares and contrasts the effects of the resale price maintenance abolition of 1964 emerging in different products and markets, with particular emphasis on the furniture and footwear trades. Finds that the furniture trade has been more significantly affected, with a higher consciousness of consumer needs among its retailers.

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European Journal of Marketing, vol. 13 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Abstract

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International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1996

James E. Spencer

Provides an overview of the present state of the footwear manufacturing industry and the consumer footwear market. Describes how many manufacturers have recognized the…

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698

Abstract

Provides an overview of the present state of the footwear manufacturing industry and the consumer footwear market. Describes how many manufacturers have recognized the need for advanced manufacturing techniques and automation technologies, turning to robotics and automation for more reliable manufacturing system solutions. Reports on the robotics integration and system‐level products specifically targeted for footwear manufacturing operations provided by three specialist companies; ACTIS Engineering, DESMA and Intelligent Machines Corporation.

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Assembly Automation, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2012

Adriana Martínez, José A. Belso‐Martínez and Francisco Más‐Verdú

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the structure of knowledge networks and the geographical patterns of knowledge networking in mature industrial clusters. To such…

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1334

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the structure of knowledge networks and the geographical patterns of knowledge networking in mature industrial clusters. To such end, it is assumed that proximity is not really what matters in innovation, but rather the embeddedness of firms into localised networks, enhancing collective learning and knowledge diffusion.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is contextualized in the footwear industry and applies the microeconomics of innovation (grounded in the resource based view and social capital approach) and industrial clusters/districts as theoretical frameworks. Methodologically, the paper adopts an exploratory perspective and employs a qualitative approach to conduct a cross‐case analysis of the Leon‐Guanajuato cluster (Mexico) and the Vinalopo cluster (Spain).

Findings

Firstly, this paper endorses recent research trends suggesting that knowledge is unevenly and selectively distributed among clustered firms. Secondly, it evidences how internal resources determine a firm's access to valuable repositories of knowledge. Thirdly, key knowledge players are usually involved in extra‐clusters networking, indicating that mere reliance on localized knowledge may result in declining trajectories.

Research limitations/implications

Because the case study approach and qualitative methodologies are used, readers are advised not to generalize the findings. The research on the subject matter is offered as a means to substantiate or refute the latest research premises, and provide evidence on the selected clusters.

Originality/value

This paper shows how knowledge networks differ depending on geographical specific characteristics and the resources of the main players. Managers‐owners should be conscious that being close to one another is not enough. It should be combined with both solid internal resources and access to repositories of knowledge outside the cluster. Policy makers should prepare customized public programs based on the particular structure of each cluster.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Book part
Publication date: 17 February 2017

Sabrina Zajak

This contribution conceptualizes the politicization of MNCs from outside – the processes by which MNCs become confronted with demands for regulation and engage in…

Abstract

This contribution conceptualizes the politicization of MNCs from outside – the processes by which MNCs become confronted with demands for regulation and engage in political contestation with other non-state actors. It compares two global industries, athletic footwear and toys, to show that the dynamics of politicization follow different trajectories, which are only partially to explain with structural differences across industry fields. If politicization leads to increasing political functioning of business or to a depoliticization of criticism depends to a great extend on the agency of business and their capacity to strategically counter mobilization, but also on the difficulties for activist to construct continuing collective action across a diverse range of cultural-institutional settings.

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Multinational Corporations and Organization Theory: Post Millennium Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-386-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Toby Harfield and R.T. Hamilton

Represents an experiment in style and methodology. Presents stories of managing decline in a rapidly deregulating environment. Collected data from managers in the New…

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1966

Abstract

Represents an experiment in style and methodology. Presents stories of managing decline in a rapidly deregulating environment. Collected data from managers in the New Zealand footwear manufacturing industry in face‐to‐face interviews with the intention of giving an insider view of strategic change. Highlights the stories of the managers, both visually and structurally, and places the academic discourse of theory and method in this background. Six stories demonstrate the diversity of the journeys taken in an attempt to manage decline in one industry. Suggests that, from the manager’s perspective, destination is determined by (and after) the journey, and not vice versa as suggested in the classical strategic management literature.

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Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2008

André Nijhof, Dai Forterre and Ronald Jeurissen

This paper aims to explore new forms of control that can address the legitimacy problems of globally‐integrated enterprises.

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4618

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore new forms of control that can address the legitimacy problems of globally‐integrated enterprises.

Design/methodology/approach

In a conceptual analysis the characteristics of the globally‐integrated enterprise are used to put forward apt strategies of control. These proposals are examined and illustrated in a case study of the strategies in use in the athletic footwear industry.

Findings

This paper argues that command‐and‐control strategies will be ineffective for globally‐integrated enterprises. In order to behave like a global corporate citizen companies need to stress controls based on belief systems and interactive systems. Certain features of this shift in control are visible within the athletic footwear industry although many strategies in use are still based on thinking like a multinational.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is explorative in nature. More empirical research is needed to test the proposals this paper puts forward.

Practical implications

The results of this paper can be used as a framework to develop control strategies for companies working from a transnational perspective.

Originality/value

The functioning of globally‐integrated enterprises creates both tremendous economic possibilities as well as new problems of legitimacy. This paper is one of the first systematic attempts to provide a framework for dealing with these legitimacy problems and also serves as an illustration of this framework in the athletic footwear sector.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Case study
Publication date: 1 May 2011

Rita J. Shea-Van Fossen

This case traces Under Armour from its founding in 1996 through 2008 when the company entered the hyper-competitive non-cleated athletic footwear market. In 1996, with an…

Abstract

This case traces Under Armour from its founding in 1996 through 2008 when the company entered the hyper-competitive non-cleated athletic footwear market. In 1996, with an innovative product and locker room access to college and pro players, Kevin Plank started Under Armour. He turned a struggling t-shirt company into a dominant player capturing 75% of the performance apparel market. In 2006, Under Armour successfully entered the athletic footwear market with a line of football cleats. Under Armour was the first company to disrupt Nike's dominance of the football cleat market by gaining 25% of the market within a year of introduction. In 2008, Under Armour entered the non-cleated athletic footwear market with a cross-trainer sneaker line and a $4.4 million Super Bowl ad. Unlike prior introductions, Nike responded aggressively to Under Armour's move into sneakers. Despite increased sales, Under Armour's costs increased, and profits and stock price decreased. The case concludes by asking students to evaluate Under Armour's next move. An extensive exhibit provides an overview of the athletic footwear industry in 2008.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2019

Maribel Guerrero, Fernando Herrera and David Urbano

The purpose of this paper is to analyse how collaborative/opportunistic behaviours within subsidised university-industry partnerships are influencing the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse how collaborative/opportunistic behaviours within subsidised university-industry partnerships are influencing the design/implementation of strategic knowledge management practices in emerging economies.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed conceptual model was analysed with a retrospective multiple case study approach integrated by four subsidised entrepreneurial universities-industry partnerships of the Incentive Programme for Innovation from 2009 to 2014 in Mexico.

Findings

Entrepreneurial universities and industrial organisations confirm insights about dual collaborative-opportunistic behaviour within subsidised partnerships. The main effects of behaviours represent an increment in the knowledge management costs during the monitoring stages. The ex ante collaboration agreement anticipated and protected intellectual capabilities.

Research limitations/implications

This research contributes to the ongoing discussion about public administrations’ opportunistic behaviours in emerging economies (Tripsas et al., 1995), the effectiveness of the innovation and entrepreneurial programmes (Guerrero and Urbano, 2019b), and the link between dual behaviours (collaborative and opportunistic) and knowledge management practices (de Wit-de Vries et al., 2018).

Practical implications

New questions emerged about the effectiveness of subsidies as new modes of knowledge generation among entrepreneurial universities and industrial organisations, as well as the need for implementing strategic knowledge management practices in the public administration.

Social implications

For policymakers, the study presents insights about the effectiveness of public resources. Policymakers should understand challenges and re-define/re-incentivize the productive value chain as well as implement mechanisms to control opportunistic behaviours on potential subsidised firms.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the academic debate about how entrepreneurial universities and industrial organisations are strategically managing their knowledge when participating in subsidised partnerships in emerging economies.

1 – 10 of over 2000