Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Peter Omondi-Ochieng

This study aims to examine the association between national economic prosperity (measured by per capita gross national income – GNI) and the acquisition of football workers

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the association between national economic prosperity (measured by per capita gross national income – GNI) and the acquisition of football workers (indicated by number of amateur footballers, football officials and professional footballers) and predict football performances (specified by qualifications at continental football championships) based on per capita GNI and football workers.

Design/methodology/approach

Archival data of 203 national football teams were utilized based on continental football championship records before 2014. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to build various models to ascertain their predictive values. Economically prosperous nations are those with a per capita GNI of more than US$10,000, and unprosperous nations are those with per capita GNI of less than US$10,000.

Findings

The analysis indicated that per capita GNI was significantly and positively associated with the acquisition of football workers – but not predictive of football performance. Rather football officials and professionals emerged to be the key predictors of football performance and not per capita GNI. The final model predicted 73.1 and 74.2 per cent of performance and non-performance, respectively, of national football teams correctly.

Research limitations

The findings were largely restricted to quantitative archival data for the last continental championships. However, future research may benefit from using qualitative interviews, questionnaires and or ethnographic studies of players, teams and or managers.

Practical implications

The results revealed that economic prosperity positively influences the acquisition of football resources (here – in football workers). Specifically, targeted production of football workers, such as the acquisition of a large number of effective professional footballers and officials, can boost football performance – and not merely economic prosperity.

Originality/value

Actual football-specific human capital (and not general population) was used in predicting continental football qualifications – a factor uncommon in such studies.

Details

Team Performance Management, vol. 21 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 May 2018

Peter Omondi-Ochieng

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to evaluate the association between human resources and qualification for the 2017 Gold Cup, and second, to examine if human…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to evaluate the association between human resources and qualification for the 2017 Gold Cup, and second, to examine if human resources could predict qualification for the 2017 Gold Cup.

Design/methodology/approach

Guided by four competitive advantage (CA) theories related to the human resources, the study utilized archival data of 35 male Gold Cup national football teams. The dependent variable was qualifications for 2017 Gold Cup and the independent variables were football-specific human capital measured by ranked number of football amateurs, professionals and officials. Statistical analysis was performed using Kendell τ statistic and binary logistic regression (BLR).

Findings

Qualification for the Gold Cup tournament and all human resources were positively and statistically associated (officials (0.493, p<0.01), amateurs (0.464, p<0.01) and professionals (0.624, p<0.01)), and BLR model (Negelkerke R2) explained 55.8 percent of the variance of human resources.

Research limitations/implications

The research focused exclusively on football-specific human capital and not alternative sources of CA such as economy power, political stability and/or national football popularity amongst others.

Practical implications

Human resources are a valuable source of CA which requires long-term strategy geared toward training, development and promotion of talent. Superior football team performance is directly proportional to talented players.

Originality/value

The study was unique in two ways. First, it made clear the positive significance of human resources as a source of CA. Second, it highlighted the distinction between professional and amateur footballers – a factor uncommon in similar studies.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 September 2019

Peter Omondi-Ochieng

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the effects of first-mover advantage (FMA) on revenue generation capacity (RGC) of US college football programmes during the 2008…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the effects of first-mover advantage (FMA) on revenue generation capacity (RGC) of US college football programmes during the 2008 global financial crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used archival data analysed quantitatively using non-parametric regression in the form of binary logistic regression. The study was then framed and interpreted by the resource-dependence theory.

Findings

FMA was positively and statistically associated with donations, branding, media rights and ticket revenues, but not win–loss records. The binary logistic regression model was correctly classified at 82.1 per cent of the variance and indicated that branding and ticket revenues were mostly associated with FMA.

Research limitations/implications

The study was delimited to public college football programmes in the USA during the 2008 global financial crisis.

Practical implications

The findings indicated that despite the 2008 global financial crisis, FMA was positively associated with RGC but not win–loss records.

Originality/value

The study was pioneering in evaluating the effects of FMA as a source of competitive advantage in college football programmes during the challenging time of the 2008 global financial crisis.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 September 2019

Peter Omondi-Ochieng

This study aims to predict the determinants of net income of 101 US university football programs.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to predict the determinants of net income of 101 US university football programs.

Design/methodology/approach

Guided by stakeholder theory, financial capacity model and resource dependency theory, the dependent variable was net income (indicated as profit or loss) and independent variables were measured as the number of women and men’s team sports, average home attendances, win–loss records, conference ranking, endowment funds and age of football programs. Statistical analysis was performed using Kendell tau and binary logistic regression (BLR).

Findings

Net income was positively and statistically associated with home attendance, win–loss record, conference rankings and endowment funds, but not number of women’s sports, age of football program and number of men’s sports teams. The BLR indicated that home attendance was the best predictor of net income.

Research limitations/implications

The research was delimited to 101 Football Bowl Subdivision football programs from public universities.

Practical implications

The findings indicate that home attendance and conference rankings had the highest association with net income, but the former was the best predictor of net income and not football tradition nor number of sports teams.

Originality/value

The study was pioneering in the predictive evaluation of the possible determinants of loss or profitability in college football programs.

Details

Journal of Financial Reporting and Accounting, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-2517

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 December 2018

Peter Omondi-Ochieng

This paper aims to predict a college football team’s competitiveness using physical resources, human resources and organizational resources.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to predict a college football team’s competitiveness using physical resources, human resources and organizational resources.

Design/methodology/approach

Guided by the resource-based theory, the study used archival data of 101 college football teams. The dependent variable was competitiveness (indicated by win-loss records), the independent variables were physical resources (operationalized as home attendance and total revenues), human resources (measured as coaches’ salary and coaches’ experience) and organizational resources (specified as conference rankings and the number of sports). Kendall Tau correlation and binary logistic regression were used to examine the associative and predictive competitive advantages.

Findings

The binary logistic regression model showed an overall percentage predictive correctness of 71.3%, with a Negelkerke R2 of 41.1% of the variance of all predictors – with coaches’ experience, total revenues and home attendance being the best predictors of generating competitive advantages that produced superior win-loss records.

Research limitations/implications

The research focused exclusively on physical, organizational and human resources as sources of competitive advantage and not physiological and/or psychological variables.

Practical implications

College football teams aspiring to be competitive may benefit from this study by applying a three-fold strategy of hiring well-paid high performing and experienced coaches who can increase attendance and revenues.

Originality/value

The study was unique in two ways – one, it made clear the positive significance of coaches’ experience as a source of competitive advantage, and second, it highlighted the catalytic effects of revenues and attendance in fueling competitiveness.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 June 2019

Peter Omondi-Ochieng

Guided by the resource-based theory, the purpose of this study was to predict the role of football talent in the Federation Internationale de Football Association (FIFA…

Abstract

Purpose

Guided by the resource-based theory, the purpose of this study was to predict the role of football talent in the Federation Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) rankings of the men’s national football teams in the Copa America zone.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used archival data of Copa American national football teams. The dependent variable was FIFA rankings, and the independent variables were football talent (measured by the stocks of amateur footballers, professional footballers and football officials). Statistical analysis was performed using Kendall tau statistic and binary logistic regression.

Findings

The binary logistic regression results indicated that FIFA rankings were statistically and significantly associated with the stock of football officials and professional footballers – but not amateur footballers. The predictive model explained 80 per cent of the variance.

Research limitations/implications

The study focused exclusively on the stock of football talent in each nation, and not alternative determinants of national football team competitiveness as economic power and quality of professional football leagues, among others.

Practical implications

The stocks of professional footballers and football officials are valuable sources of competitive advantage (CA) in national football team rankings.

Originality/value

The study highlighted the uniqueness and distinctiveness of a nation possessing large stocks of professional footballers which can boost the CA and rankings of Copa American national football teams.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 August 2018

Melike Yılmaz, Çağlar Aksezer and Tankut Atan

This paper aims to investigate how predictions of football league standings and efficiency measures of teams, obtained through frontier estimation technique, evolve…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how predictions of football league standings and efficiency measures of teams, obtained through frontier estimation technique, evolve compared to actual results.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on data from the Turkish first division football league. Historical data for five seasons, from 2011 to 2016, are used to compare weekly estimates to de facto results. Data envelopment analysis efficiency measures are used to estimate team performances. After each week, a data envelopment analysis is run using available data until then, and final team standings are estimated via computed efficiencies. Estimations are improved by using a data envelopment analysis model that incorporates expert knowledge about football.

Findings

Results indicate that deductions can be made about the league’s future progress. Model incorporating expert knowledge tends to estimate the performance better. Although the prediction accuracy starts out low in early stages, it improves as the season advances. Scatter of individual teams’ performances show fluxional behaviour, which attracts studying the impact of uncontrollable factors such as refereeing.

Originality/value

While all previous studies focus on season performance, this study handles the problem as a combination of weekly performance and how it converges to reality. By tracking weekly performance, managers get a chance to confront their weak performance indicators and achieve higher ranking by improving on these inefficiencies.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 April 2012

Keith H. Sakuda

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between national diversity and team performance. Research on US teams involved in a task of low interdependence…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between national diversity and team performance. Research on US teams involved in a task of low interdependence (baseball) is replicated with a Japanese sample to investigate possible cross‐national differences. The paper also presents a new quantitative measure of diversity.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses quantitative research based on archival data. Regression modeling is applied to professional sports data from Japan. National diversity of teams is operationalized using a new approach to Blau's Index.

Findings

A negative relationship was found between national diversity and team performance in Japan. No significant results were found for age diversity. The results for national diversity are in contrast to research conducted on similar teams in the USA.

Practical implications

The findings provide evidence of cross‐national differences between US and Japanese teams. Findings are also directly applicable to managers in the growing field of international sports management and sports business.

Originality/value

Globalization has resulted in the internationalization of the professional sports industry. This paper is one of the first international studies of professional sports teams that span the East‐West divide, to provide insights on international team performances. Findings from this cross‐national comparison of US and Japanese teams contribute to organizational research by reinforcing the need to consider national context in diversity research. Educators will find that use of professional sports allows students to easily relate to the findings of the study. Managers are offered direct evidence that team dynamics related to diversity are different between US and Japanese teams.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2020

Rosa Lombardi, Raffaele Trequattrini, Benedetta Cuozzo and Paola Paoloni

Over recent decades, knowledge transfer processes and knowledge-intensive organizations have been increasingly investigated from several perspectives. Knowledge…

Abstract

Purpose

Over recent decades, knowledge transfer processes and knowledge-intensive organizations have been increasingly investigated from several perspectives. Knowledge translation activated by knowledge-intensive organizations is supported by several factors, among which intangible assets play a significant role. Our research mainly investigates the relationship between the knowledge owned by knowledge workers in source organizations and the process of its translation to recipient organizations. Specifically, this paper aims at analyzing knowledge translation and organizational performance in the football industry, uncovering both the role of professional football players' skills transfer and the determinants of achieving positive performance at the organizational level.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative method is adopted, using both bivariate linear regression analysis and network analysis. Using key aspects of Nakauchi et al.'s (2007) knowledge transfer framework, intra-organizational dynamics are analyzed based on measurements of the performance of professional football players before and after transferring from one club (the source organization) to another (the recipient organization).

Findings

Our research results are mainly intended to show the factors that influence knowledge translation in the light of team performance improvement. Our empirical analysis shows the need for the coexistence of a combination of factors, especially the quality of the source and recipient organizations and of the relationship between them, to achieve the transferability of professional football players' capabilities and performance.

Practical implications

The academic community, practitioners and policymakers can draw on the theoretical and practical advances made by the findings to address knowledge translation issues with an improved understanding of its factors and determinants.

Originality/value

Despite some limitations to the study, we identify the factors, determinants and contexts that facilitate the transfer of knowledge and specialist knowledge and thus contribute to the successful operation of contemporary organizations. Moreover, the results of our analysis are applicable to all economic sectors.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 58 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Peter Kennedy and David Kennedy

The purpose of this paper is to examine the elective affinity between sport science and elite football by situating it first, within the wider political economy of football

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the elective affinity between sport science and elite football by situating it first, within the wider political economy of football and second, within the dynamics of the market and work situation faced by elite players in the modern game.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology underpinning this paper continues this movement by considering the impact on market and work situation of elite footballers due to wider social structures and the distribution of social power peculiar to the football industry. It is premised on the view that observed events and contingent relations and processes are linked to more enduring social structures and that knowledge must take account of all three.

Findings

The resulting impact of sport science on elite football is contradictory, facilitating, on the one hand, the development of football as an aesthetic experience, while on the other hand, threatening to transform the football spectacle into a mundane exercise in the search for increased functional peak performance for its own sake.

Research limitations/implications

The value of this paper is that it considers salaries and player power to determine value by exploring the impact on market and work situation of elite footballers set in the context of wider social structures and the distribution of social power peculiar to the football industry.

Practical implications

Elite footballers yield immense power over their market situation, which sport science has the potential to enhance and sustain by fine honing peak fitness. The football club’s relative lack of control of the player’s market situation necessitates the appliance of sport science to help maximize control over the player’s work situation.

Social implications

The paper demonstrates that sport science develops elite footballers to peak fitness, while also developing footballers as commodities; and this latter aspect if taken too far may potentially transform football into a mundane exercise in the search for increased functional peak performance for its own sake.

Originality/value

The paper draws together the relatively neglected analysis of the football labour process with the increasing interventions of sport science to football and sets this within a broader political economy of football.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000