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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Zhuming Bi, Guoping Wang, Li Da Xu, Matt Thompson, Raihan Mir, Jeremy Nyikos, Armela Mane, Colton Witte and Cliff Sidwell

The purpose of this paper is to develop an information system which is based on the Internet of things (IoT) and used to support the communication and coordination in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an information system which is based on the Internet of things (IoT) and used to support the communication and coordination in a cooperative robot team.

Design/methodology/approach

The architecture of the IoT applications for decision-making activities in a complex system is elaborated, the focus lies on the effective implementation of system interactions at the device-level. A case study is provided to verify system performances.

Findings

The IoT concept has been introduced in an information system of a football robot team to support the coordination among team players. Various sensors are used to collect data from IoT, and data are processed for the controls of robotic players to achieve the better performance at the system level. The field test has shown the feasibility and effectiveness.

Research limitations/implications

To investigate how IoT can be utilized in an information system for making complex decisions effectively, the authors use the decision-support system for a football robot team to illustrate the approaches in developing data acquisition infrastructure, processing and utilizing real-time data for the communication and coordination of robot players in a dynamic competing environment. While the presented work has shown the feasibility of an IoT-based information system, more work are needed to integrate advanced sensors within the IoT and develop more intelligent algorithms to replace manually remote control for the operations of robot players.

Practical implications

The proposed system is specifically for a football robot team; however, the associated approaches are applicable to any decentralized system for developing an information system to support IoT-based communication and coordination within the system in the real-time mode.

Originality/value

The exploration of IoT applications is still at its early stage, existing relevant work is mostly limited to the development of system architecture, sensor networks, and communication protocols. In this paper, the methods on how to use massive real-time data for decision-making of a decentralized team have been investigated, and the proposed system has its theoretical significance to developing other decentralized wireless sensor networks and decision-making systems.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Huosheng Hu and Dongbing Gu

It has been an ultimate long‐term dream in robotics and AI fields to build robotic systems with life‐like appearance, behaviours and intelligence, reflected by many…

Abstract

It has been an ultimate long‐term dream in robotics and AI fields to build robotic systems with life‐like appearance, behaviours and intelligence, reflected by many science fiction books and films. This is also an extremely challenging task. This paper introduces our current research efforts to build a multi‐agent system for cooperation and learning of multiple life‐like robots in the RoboCup domain. A behaviour‐based hierarchy is proposed for the Essex Rovers robot football team to achieve intelligent actions in real time, which includes both a neural network‐based color detection algorithm and a fuzzy logic controller. Preliminary results based on legged locomotion experiments of Sony walking robots are presented.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2012

Shi Hao‐bin, Yu Zhu‐jun, Xu You‐feng and Li Wei‐hua

The purpose of this paper is to establish a situation evaluation model of the robot and ball in SimuroSot5vs5 platforms and enhance the strength of the team in a SimuroSot5vs5.

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267

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish a situation evaluation model of the robot and ball in SimuroSot5vs5 platforms and enhance the strength of the team in a SimuroSot5vs5.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a mathematical model based on situation evaluations which can improve the strength of the team in SimuroSot5vs5. The situation evaluation focus on four aspects includes scores of both sides, possession of teams on ground, ball strategy, and treat. The statistical analysis of the score can verify validity and stability of current strategy in confrontation. To evaluate the situation more effectively without blindness, possession on both teams is, respectively, evaluated. Ball strategy analyzes coordinate transformation to the ball on the ground and illustrates the circumstance of both teams on the offensive position accurately in length and breadth. To know the circumstance on the field more completely and synthetically, a threat situation evaluation model is built. An effective and practical algorithm for comprehensive situation evaluation is successfully finished. The experiments prove validity and performance of the proposed situation evaluation model.

Findings

A mathematical model is designed to achieve situation evaluation, and the strategy can change in accordance with different situations on the ground.

Research limitations/implications

The system is specifically applied to SimuroSot5vs5 platform. The extensibility of the system is limited.

Practical implications

When the robot and ball is in high speed movement, a large calculated amount will slow the speed of the system.

Originality/value

The paper shows that situation evaluation in SimuroSot decision support systems will enhance the battle effectiveness of the soccer team.

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

D.‐J. Peet, K.F. Mulder and A. Bijma

When sustainable development (SD) is only taught in specific courses, it is questionable if engineering students are able to integrate it into their engineering practices…

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987

Abstract

When sustainable development (SD) is only taught in specific courses, it is questionable if engineering students are able to integrate it into their engineering practices and technical designs. For this reason, sustainability should also be integrated into regular engineering courses, e.g. design courses, materials courses or processing technology. The SD education plan adopted by the board of Delft University of Technology (DUT) in 1998 was based on this philosophy. It consists of three interconnected activities for all engineering curricula: the implementation of an elementary course “Technology in sustainable development”; the development of a graduation program in sustainable development for students who want to specialize; and the integration of sustainable development in all regular courses, wherever applicable. This paper describes various activities that the project group carried out to stimulate and support the third strategy: SD integration. It turned out that top‐down attempts to influence the content of courses often triggered resistance among lecturers, as they feared the intermingling of laymen into their scientific/engineering discipline. Interaction was important but was often impossible by lack of mutual understanding. Participation in a national project aimed to stimulate discussion by making disciplinary sustainability reviews of academic/engineering disciplines. This approach was promising as it created the base for serious discussions. However, the reports often ended in the bureaucracies of the departments. More positive results were achieved with a semi‐consultant approach directed at discussing SD issues with individual lecturers. Many lecturers were willing to discuss their courses, and were interested in practical ideas to integrate sustainability. This interactive approach is promising because it does not conflict with academic culture and keeps the lecturer in charge of his own course.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Christine Connolly

Robot football uses autonomous vehicles that respond to unpredictable events. It presents engineering challenges embracing a wide range of disciplines, and attracts and…

Abstract

Robot football uses autonomous vehicles that respond to unpredictable events. It presents engineering challenges embracing a wide range of disciplines, and attracts and holds the interest of undergraduates and postgraduates, educationists, school children and laymen. National and international tournaments stretch the competitors and lead to an ever‐increasing standard of achievement.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Joanne Pransky

This paper, a “Q&A interview” conducted by Joanne Pransky of Industrial Robot Journal, aims to impart the combined technological, business and personal experience of a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper, a “Q&A interview” conducted by Joanne Pransky of Industrial Robot Journal, aims to impart the combined technological, business and personal experience of a prominent, robotic industry engineer-turned entrepreneur regarding the evolution, commercialization and challenges of bringing a technological invention to market.

Design/methodology/approach

The interviewee is Dr Esben H. Ostergaard, inventor, co-founder and chief technology officer of Universal Robots. From building his first robot to solve a local industrial problem at the age of four, to building the world’s first collaborative robot company, Dr Ostergaard shares his lifelong ventures as a robot scientist, inventor and entrepreneur.

Findings

Dr Ostergaard received degrees in computer science, physics and multimedia at Aarhus University in Denmark, and a PhD in robotics from the University of Southern Denmark. While at Aarhus, Dr Ostergaard pursued his hobby of robot football, and in 1998, his team STATIC became the world champion of the Federation of International Robot-soccer Association (FIRA). Dr Ostergaard held research positions at the University of Southern California (USC) Robotics Labs and at the Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) in Tsukuba/Tokyo. During the years 2001-2005 as a researcher and assistant professor in robotics and user interfaces at University of Southern Denmark, he created the foundation for a reinvention of the industrial robot. This led him to found Universal Robots in 2005 with two of his research colleagues.

Originality/value

From a young child who played with LEGOs until he got a Commodore 64, Dr Ostergaard has always been interested in robotics. His unique multidisciplinary education and multicultural research experiences helped him to pioneer a new multi-axis, lightweight industrial robot and launch the successful company, Universal Robots, which has grown from its three co-founders to nearly 150 employees, with more than 4,000 collaborative robot applications installed in over 50 countries worldwide. Dr Ostergaard has over 30 patents and has received many awards, including the 2012 IEEE-IFR Invention and Entrepreneurship Award (IERA), the 2013 Japanese Institute Good Design Award, the 2013 Robotics Business Review Game Changer Award and the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year 2012 in Region Funen.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

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49

Abstract

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

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51

Abstract

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

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50

Abstract

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2008

Christine Connolly

This paper's aim is to assess the practical advances resulting from progress in artificial intelligence affecting vision‐equipped robots.

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1374

Abstract

Purpose

This paper's aim is to assess the practical advances resulting from progress in artificial intelligence affecting vision‐equipped robots.

Design/methodology/approach

A short history of artificial intelligence applied to robotic hand‐eye coordination is followed by a description of some of the milestones in pattern recognition, interfacing, operating systems and programming paradigms. Finally, a range of current‐day practical applications is given, from industrial to student project.

Findings

The paper finds that advances in the speed and robustness of pattern recognition algorithms have been very important in the development of robots that adapt to randomly positioned workpieces. Event‐triggered object oriented programming, wide address buses, smart cameras, ethernet and other standard cables and communications formats, and the ever‐increasing power of computers are also of great practical importance.

Originality/value

The paper contrasts the current state of robotic vision with that 20 years ago.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

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