Search results

1 – 10 of 207
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 16 September 2020

Jun Akamine

This paper aims to discuss how whale meat foodways in Japan is a local practice, contrary to the prevailing political belief that it is national, and to examine two local…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss how whale meat foodways in Japan is a local practice, contrary to the prevailing political belief that it is national, and to examine two local whale meat foodways in Japan by focusing on the usage of blubber. To understand complexity of whaling issue, one needs to be careful of species rather than general “whale.”

Design/methodology/approach

By investigating two kinds of recipe books, one published in the early 19th century and the other the early 20th century on whale meat dish, the paper clarifies blubber has been widely consumed rather than lean meat, and blubber was more important than lean meat as whale meat.

Findings

The western part of Japan has rich whale meat foodways compared to other parts of Japan. It is because of their history of whaling since the 17th century. They have inherited rich whale meat foodways.

Originality/value

Although whale sashimi and deep-fried lean meat are popular nationwide regardless of their communities' history, former whaling communities in the western part of Japan developed a preference for blubber, skin, tongue and offal over lean meat. Whale meat foodways in Japan, therefore, is a local heritage. This fact should be the starting point for analyzing Japanese whaling and whale meat foodways.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 6 June 2008

Marcus Aldredge

The purpose of this paper is to explore the negotiation and otherization of the regional representations of southern foodways in public restaurants within a larger urban…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the negotiation and otherization of the regional representations of southern foodways in public restaurants within a larger urban cultural setting often seen as its cultural antithesis.

Design/methodology/approach

The method and approach is multifaceted, including content and historical analysis and participant observation. The literature review lays the foundation for the otherization of the South in the USA. The content analysis explores various media publications relevant to southern food restaurants and the qualitative analysis demonstrates the nuances of southern restaurants in New York City.

Findings

The literature and content analysis demonstrates the socio‐historical grounding for the otherization of the South and southern foodways. The qualitative research demonstrates how southern restaurants are constructed and otherized differently in New York City depending upon their local context and the participants who are primarily involved.

Research limitations/implications

A larger sample of restaurants could provide a potentially more valid and nuanced analysis of the phenomena.

Originality/value

Most research on regional, subcultural differences in foodways occurs within the imagined boundaries of that respective region, but this paper explores the historical proliferation of restaurants and the meanings of the production and consumption of southern regional foods in these restaurants within another region.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1992

Alan Beardsworth and Teresa Keil

Examines the dimensions of stability and change in the foodways ofcontemporary Britain. The structural and cultural origins of change areoutlined and various sociological…

Abstract

Examines the dimensions of stability and change in the foodways of contemporary Britain. The structural and cultural origins of change are outlined and various sociological explanations of these phenomena are discussed. Subsequently, both the positive and negative implications of the contemporary state of flux are investigated, particularly with reference to the argument that a state of gastro‐anomy pertains. This view is subjected to critical examination and the argument is put forward that a state of anomy may be a transitional one on the road to a more open and pluralistic nutritional order.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 94 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 9 October 2019

Mohamed E. Mohamed, Mahmoud Hewedi, Xinran Lehto and Magdy Maayouf

Given the increased importance of food in tourists’ travel experience, the purpose of this paper is to explore the current and future potential of local food and foodways

Abstract

Purpose

Given the increased importance of food in tourists’ travel experience, the purpose of this paper is to explore the current and future potential of local food and foodways in marketing Egyptian destinations online.

Design/methodology/approach

The content of 20 Egyptian destination marketing organization (DMO) websites was subject to a content analysis. A checklist was developed based on literature analysis. The frequencies of information related to food culture and cuisine marketing were tallied, followed by a qualitative assessment of contents from the various websites. The results were further discussed with DMO representatives to provide contextualized insights as to the future potential of utilizing local food and food tourism initiatives as a component of DMOs website marketing in Egypt.

Findings

The study noted some initial efforts for Egyptian DMO websites to market food culture and gastronomic practices; however, the results suggest that the usage of food culture on Egyptian DMOs websites is still in its infancy. The study also highlights the challenges that need to be tackled as well as the resources required for food tourism development.

Practical implications

This study illustrates the need and potential capacity of Egyptian DMO websites to market food culture and local cuisines (including traditional foods and table manners). These results are expected to help Egyptian DMOs to strategically embrace local cuisine and food culture as a vehicle for destination marketing.

Originality/value

This case study provides insights for African and other developing economies in their destination marketing. The proposed framework and guidelines are intended to potentially serve as a framework for destination marketers and entrepreneurs to optimize the tourism potential of food culture.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 22 October 2019

James Farrer

For migrant urban ethnographers who study their city of settlement, ethnography may have a double meaning, serving not only as an approach to understanding a city…

Abstract

For migrant urban ethnographers who study their city of settlement, ethnography may have a double meaning, serving not only as an approach to understanding a city academically but also a pathway to connecting with a community more broadly and personally, a type of personal place making. This chapter uses the experiences of the author – an American working and living in Shanghai and Tokyo for over 20 years – to show how his evolving practice of the ethnography of the city relates to a slow process of coming to live purposefully in it. The chapter also details a migrant’s perspective on the ethnography of sexuality, nightlife and foodways in urban Asia. The insider-outsider relationship that the migrant ethnographer brings to the city may be viewed as both burden and asset. As transnational migrants, migrant ethnographers can perform as institutional mediaries who connect researchers across borders and as educational facilitators who help migrant students discover means of associating with an unfamiliar environment. In short, ethnography may be a way of living as well as learning.

Details

Urban Ethnography
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-033-2

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Alana Mann

Abstract

Details

Food in a Changing Climate
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-725-9

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2016

Myrdene Anderson

This longitudinal case study affords opportunistic infra-cross-cultural and gendered comparisons of foodways within the fourth-world Saami societies across four…

Abstract

Purpose

This longitudinal case study affords opportunistic infra-cross-cultural and gendered comparisons of foodways within the fourth-world Saami societies across four north-European nation-states and through two generations. The study centers on 44 years of ethnographic research in arctic Norway, among both nomadic reindeer-herding and sedentary Saami together with their nearest neighbors within and without northernmost Norway.

Methodology/approach

General ethnographic immersion, from five years in duration down to single months or weeks, since early 1972, provides qualitative and quantitative data relevant to gender and food, collected in the two local languages, and supplemented by archeological and historical records as well as literatures from contiguous areas.

Findings

Two generations ago, most families, nomadic, or settled, could remember being self-sufficient with respect to food, and to lesser extents to clothing and shelter. Women’s roles in food acquisition and preparation have expanded in recent times. Some families, given choices largely made by wives and mothers, may today have a diet comparable with that in other parts of the West.

Research limitations/implications

This holistic ethnographic research continues indefinitely. Any ethnography is both enabled and limited by its investigator and by local social relations, in this case synergistic and positive.

Social implications

By the close of the 20th century, Saami researchers joined others in social science, often focusing on their indigenous culture and language. These provide usually corroborating and always fascinating data for outsiders, and many anecdotal narratives illustrating these data.

Details

Gender and Food: From Production to Consumption and After
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-054-1

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Jackie Goode, Alan Beardsworth, Cheryl Haslam, Teresa Keil and Emma Sherratt

Reports new research into stability and change in contemporaryfoodways. Uses survey and in‐depth interviews to uncover familiarfeatures which could be described as…

Downloads
1058

Abstract

Reports new research into stability and change in contemporary foodways. Uses survey and in‐depth interviews to uncover familiar features which could be described as traditional, as well as more novel patterns. Highlights the ways in which the two are interwoven. The picture is characterized by a number of serious nutritional concerns, including health, weight control, food safety and food ethics. There is also familiarity with official nutritional guidelines, despite a widespread perception of contradictory and confusing nutritional messages. Finds mistrust of farmers, food companies and the government as far as the provision of safe food for the public is concerned. Such negative findings by no means represent the whole picture, however. Shows that, in the midst of such perceived contradiction and mistrust of external agencies, there is a personal confidence in dietary decision making and pleasure in food and eating.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 97 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

Abel Duarte Alonso and Martin A. O'Neill

Consumption of muscadine grapes and their by‐products (e.g. skins, seeds, wine and juice) is often discussed in terms of their alleged health‐ related properties (e.g…

Downloads
573

Abstract

Purpose

Consumption of muscadine grapes and their by‐products (e.g. skins, seeds, wine and juice) is often discussed in terms of their alleged health‐ related properties (e.g. high content of resveratrol, phenolics and antioxidants). Almost no information, however, is available from an academic perspective on consumers' association with this food, including their knowledge, actual consumption of muscadines or by‐products they associate with muscadine grapes. This study seeks to add to the limited existing knowledge on muscadine grapes and their by‐products exploring these areas.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of consumers from a Southern US town, where muscadine grapes are native, was chosen. A total of 189 participated completing a questionnaire.

Findings

Overall, respondents indicated familiarity with muscadine grapes and by‐products (e.g. wine, jams, juice), but predominantly the more mature respondents related much more to those by‐products than the younger consumer groups. Concerning muscadine wines, while 56.6 per cent of respondents were familiar with this product, and 45.5 per cent considered their consumption experience satisfying to very satisfying, 67.7 per cent either never buy them or seldom do so, suggesting very limited attachment with muscadine grapes.

Research limitations/implications

Choosing one single geographic location (a Southern US town) and the number of participants are two limitations of this study.

Practical implications

Given the importance of muscadine grapes and their by‐products for the Southern region, particularly culturally, traditionally and for consumers in general in terms of beneficial health‐related properties, an argument is made concerning the need to promote this ancient food. The role of the hospitality and tourism sector, government, agricultural and consumer groups is therefore suggested in promoting, marketing and other forms conducive to raising the profile of muscadine by‐products.

Originality/value

The study focuses on a food (muscadines) and environment (the Southern US region) that despite their cultural importance continue to be under‐researched – even ignored – by much of the contemporary consumer behaviour, hospitality and other literature.

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 11 September 2007

Irma Tikkanen

The purpose of this paper is to explore the sectors of food tourism in Finland by using Maslow's hierarchy of needs in the classification.

Downloads
24066

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the sectors of food tourism in Finland by using Maslow's hierarchy of needs in the classification.

Design/methodology/approach

Previous research on food tourism concentrates on the role of food as an attraction, as a cultural phenomenon, and as an experience. Moreover, food from productional and motivational viewpoints is reviewed briefly. The empirical data consists both of the secondary data and an interview.

Findings

The findings introduce five sectors of food tourism where the needs and motivations are linked with Maslow's hierarchy of needs.

Practical implications

The practical implications are that the food tourism promoters could emphasize the needs and motivations when marketing food tourism services.

Originality/value

Sectors of food tourism in Finland classified by the hierarchy of needs are presented, providing practical implications for food tourism promoters and thus offering motivations for food tourism.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 109 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 207