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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2012

Sudershan Rao Vemula, R. Naveen Kumar and Kalpagam Polasa

The purpose of this paper is to review the nature and extent of foodborne diseases in India due to chemical and microbial agents.

1702

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the nature and extent of foodborne diseases in India due to chemical and microbial agents.

Design/methodology/approach

The scientific investigations/reports on outbreak of foodborne diseases in India for the past 29 (1980‐2009) years due to adulteration, chemical, and microbiological contamination have been reviewed. Reported scientific information on foodborne pathogens detected and quantified in Indian foods has also been reviewed.

Findings

A total of 37 outbreaks involving 3,485 persons who have been affected due to food poisoning have been reported in India. Although the common forms of foodborne diseases are those due to bacterial contamination of foods, however, higher numbers of deaths have been observed due to chemical contaminants in foods.

Originality/value

A national foodborne disease surveillance system needs to be developed in India in order to enable effective detection, control and prevention of foodborne disease outbreaks.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 114 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Judith Hilton

The Food Standards Agency has set a five‐year target to reduce foodborne disease in the UK by 20 per cent. The Agency’s strategy proposes measures throughout the food…

1449

Abstract

The Food Standards Agency has set a five‐year target to reduce foodborne disease in the UK by 20 per cent. The Agency’s strategy proposes measures throughout the food chain, from the farm to the kitchen. It is designed to reduce the risks associated with common vehicles of foodborne infections, such as raw meat, poultry, milk and dairy products, and to promote effective management of food safety, based on the principles of Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points, in all food businesses. Measures to improve food hygiene in the kitchen, whether commercial or domestic, are also planned, underpinned by a media‐based food hygiene campaign. The campaign will aim to raise the profile of food safety on the public agenda and deliver key preventative messages about the cooking and handling of food. Reduction in foodborne disease will be monitored through laboratory reports of key foodborne pathogens.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 May 2019

Tahra Elobeid, Ioannis Savvaidis and Vijay Ganji

In many developing countries, the main source of food related illness is the fast foods restaurants. Health inspections of fast-food restaurants may not be sufficient to…

1302

Abstract

Purpose

In many developing countries, the main source of food related illness is the fast foods restaurants. Health inspections of fast-food restaurants may not be sufficient to ensure and enforce the food safety regulations. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the food safety knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) of fast food handlers in Qatar.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 102 fast-food handlers through a structured survey. The questionnaire comprised questions on food safety KAP. The association between scores for KAP among the food handlers was measured with Spearman’s rank correlation.

Findings

A significant direct association was found throughout the different criteria of food safety KAP. In total, 90 percent of fast food handlers had undergone formal training on food safety. Although fast food handlers thought they had overall good knowledge on food safety (93.9 percent), results showed that they had a poor knowledge on proper cleaning of equipment, cross-contamination, foodborne diseases, food danger zone and correct procedures for thawing of frozen food. Only (34.7 percent) of the food handlers correctly identified Salmonella as a food pathogen.

Originality/value

Based on the current findings, the authors believe that continuous food safety and hygiene training should be implemented in all food service operations especially in fast-food restaurants in Qatar to ensure that all food handlers have the knowledge and the skill to provide safe food.

Article
Publication date: 27 May 2022

Sunaina Thakur and Pulkit Mathur

Unsafe food can lead to various foodborne diseases and even death, especially among children. This paper aims to assess food safety knowledge and changes in practices and…

Abstract

Purpose

Unsafe food can lead to various foodborne diseases and even death, especially among children. This paper aims to assess food safety knowledge and changes in practices and concerns among adults ≥ 18 years during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional, web-based survey was conducted among 325 adults living in Northern India. Demographic data and information regarding their knowledge, practices and concerns about various food safety issues were collected to see if there were any changes due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Findings

The results showed that the participants had slightly higher than average knowledge and good food safety practices with mean scores of 9.75 ± 2.23 and 24.87 ± 2.28, respectively. Contracting COVID-19 from food and food packaging materials was of high concern for more than 70% of the participants. Majority (> 80%) of them reported an increase in the frequency of handwashing. About 16% of the participants used chemical disinfectants for washing fruits and vegetables. An increase (57.5%) in the frequency of food label reading was also noted during the pandemic. Freshness and the general quality of food items (49.5%), safety of food (30.8%) and cost (18.2%) were the top drivers that influenced the purchase decision.

Originality/value

This study highlighted the need to send out clear messages on safe food handling practices and keeping the tempo up for sustaining good hygienic practices. This will help in reducing the risk of foodborne diseases.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Barbara Mullan, Cara Wong, Jemma Todd, Esther Davis and Emily Jane Kothe

The purpose of this paper is to utilise the comprehensive Food Safety Knowledge Instrument to compare food hygiene knowledge across a population of high school and…

1972

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to utilise the comprehensive Food Safety Knowledge Instrument to compare food hygiene knowledge across a population of high school and university students in Australia and the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 475 students from secondary schools and universities in Australia and the UK took part in a survey, which included a Food Safety Knowledge Instrument and demographic items.

Findings

Food safety knowledge was generally very low. High school students had a mean score of only 38 per cent, while university students just reached a “pass” with a mean of 54 per cent. Demographics accounted for 41 per cent of variance in food knowledge scores. Female gender, being at university rather than high school, and living out of home rather than with parents were associated with greater food knowledge. Residing in Australia rather than the UK and being older were also associated with greater knowledge; however, these findings were subsumed by education group. Socio-economic status was not a significant predictor of food knowledge.

Practical implications

Identifying demographic and cultural differences in food knowledge can help to identify at-risk populations to better target in theory and knowledge-based interventions.

Originality/value

This study is the first to apply the knowledge instrument in an Australian population. Understanding the baseline knowledge in this population is an important first step at developing effective interventions for food safety.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 November 2021

Pınar Göbel, Nevin Şanlier, Sine Yilmaz, Onur Toka, Büşra Açikalin and Şule Kocabaş

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the levels of food safety knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) of consumer.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the levels of food safety knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) of consumer.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 1,161 volunteers were included in this study, which has been developed to measure the knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of adults on food safety. Study data were collected through an online survey technique.

Findings

A statistically significant difference was determined between male and female participants and also at the education level considering total food safety attitude and practice scores (p < 0,001). It was determined that university graduates had higher scores at all scales than the median scores. When an assessment was made on the body mass index of the participants, it was seen that the implementation and attitude scales were statistically different from each other, and in paired comparisons on these scales, the average scores of normal-weight individuals were observed higher in the sub-dimensions than slightly obese individuals (p < 0.007; p < 0.001).

Research limitations/implications

Even though the population of the study was adults living in different cities, the results should not be generalized to all adults and the whole country. Also, the fact that the answers to the questions were not face-to-face, could create a bias. Although the reliability coefficient was found to be high, the data reported by the individuals participating in the study about their behavior formed the study results.

Originality/value

This study makes an important contribution to the literature. Determining the knowledge, attitude and behavior of consumers about food safety is important in ensuring food safety.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 52 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Kwanhatai Thongpalad, Sushil Koirala and Anil Kumar Anal

Safe food from animal origins rely on preventive measures adopted at the farm level. However, farmers' awareness on the food safety risk is limited, affecting their…

Abstract

Purpose

Safe food from animal origins rely on preventive measures adopted at the farm level. However, farmers' awareness on the food safety risk is limited, affecting their on-farm activities. Thus, this study was conducted to assess and compare the farmers' perceptions on food safety issues and risks caused by the management and practices at layer farms.

Design/methodology/approach

Farmers from 143 farms certified by National Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) standard and 59 non-GAP farms were interviewed using a structured questionnaire for risk perception evaluation. Their level of perceived risk was compared using a scoring system.

Findings

The food safety hazards in eggs seem to be fairly recognized by both groups of farmers. GAP farmers demonstrated a higher risk of food safety incidences caused by inappropriate management and practices in farms than non-GAP farmers (p < 0.001). Although the results did not confirm the strong connection between risk perception and risk reduction behavior, these findings are beneficial to the food safety policy implementers to evaluate the critical issues for risk communication and for knowledge dissemination activities. The influence of other internal and external factors on farmers' food safety-related behavior should be further investigated.

Research limitations/implications

The impact limitation was identified due to the restriction of scope on a specific population and region. The target respondents did not cover all scales, especially the backyard and smallholder farmers nor other rearing systems, such as free-range productions.

Originality/value

The knowledge regarding the food safety practices by egg producing farmers in Thailand is limited. Notably, this study contributes to the literature in elucidating the preventive behavior of food handlers and all stakeholders in the Thai food supply chain. The implementations of food safety preventive measures by two groups of farmers, GAP-certified and non-GAP-certified farmers, will guide policymakers to intervene more successfully regarding the appropriate changes needed.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 1999

Susan Miles, Denise S. Braxton and Lynn J. Frewer

A marked increase in the incidence of microbial food poisoning parallels increasing scientific and public concern about microbiological hazards. This literature review…

3946

Abstract

A marked increase in the incidence of microbial food poisoning parallels increasing scientific and public concern about microbiological hazards. This literature review highlights the important pathogens involved in the increase and issues salient to developing effective risk‐benefit communication with the public about microbial food poisoning. Research into public perceptions of microbiological food hazards is reviewed, together with public attitudes towards one of the technologies that could combat food poisoning: food irradiation. Suggestions for reducing the incidence of microbial food poisoning through effective communication strategies are provided.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 101 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Tabassum Ali, Aftab Alam and Jabir Ali

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the market structure and level of competition in health and wellness food products by type, category, prime positioning and…

1873

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the market structure and level of competition in health and wellness food products by type, category, prime positioning and distribution networks in India.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is conducted using secondary data from Euromonitor International. Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) has been calculated for analyzing the market trends in terms of type, category and prime positioning and market competition has been analyzed using Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI). Analysis of variance has been used for analyzing the statistical difference in market competition.

Findings

Consumer purchase behavior for food is significantly changing across the world and consumers are becoming increasingly conscious of the health enhancing properties of food. With growing incidences of problems like obesity, diabetes, coronary heart diseases and foodborne diseases, consumers are becoming aware of the role of food in ensuring health and well-being. There have been significant structural changes in the health and wellness food market compositions and India has huge market potential for health and wellness food products with a market size of Rs. 435 billion in 2013 and growing at a significantly high annual growth rate of about 13.8 percent during 2002-2013. HHI results clearly indicate that there is significant competition in the health and wellness food market with average HHI of 0.19. However, the structure of market competition shows a varied trend across the types, categories, prime-positioning and distribution channels of health and wellness food products.

Practical implications

Results of the study provide a better understanding of temporal as well as intra-category changes in market size of health and wellness food products and the competitiveness of the health and wellness food market, providing valuable insights to the companies involved in producing and marketing of health and wellness food products in India.

Originality/value

Health and wellness food market is an emerging area for the marketer and there are limited analysis on market structure and competition.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Muhammad Hussnain Siddique, Muhammad Usman Qamar, Sumreen Hayat, Bilal Aslam, Habibullah Nadeem, Sabir Hussain, Muhammad Saqalein, Javeria Saeed and Saima Muzammil

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the prevalence and antibiograms of bacteria isolated from various fresh fruit juices at a local market in Faisalabad.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the prevalence and antibiograms of bacteria isolated from various fresh fruit juices at a local market in Faisalabad.

Design/methodology/approach

Fresh fruit juice samples (n=125) were randomly collected using aseptic technique. Each sample (10 mL) was serially diluted with 90 mL of sterile peptone water, from 1×10−1 to 1×10−5. Each dilution was then used to inoculate nutrient agar by surface spread plating. Aerobic colony counts (ACCs) were determined by colony counting. The isolates were sub-cultured on blood and MacConkey agar. Preliminary identification was achieved on the basis of colony morphology and culture characteristic, and confirmed by API® 20E, 20NE, and API® Staph testing. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was carried out using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion assay, per CLSI 2015 guidelines.

Findings

The mean ACC ranged from 2.0×106 CFU/mL to 4.93×106 CFU/mL, with the highest ACC determined for orange juice. Overall, 153 polymicrobial were identified in 125 samples; 103 of these were Gram-negative rods (GNR) and 28 were Gram-positive cocci (GPC). Escherichia coli (n=38), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=32) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=24) were the predominant GNR; Staphylococcus aureus (n=28) was the predominant GPC. Antibiogram analysis revealed that all GNR were resistant to ampicillin. However, most E. coli isolates were resistant to ceftazidime (72.4 percent of isolates), and ceftriaxone and cefepime (68.9 percent), while most K. pneumoniae isolates were resistant to cefepime (72 percent) and ceftriaxone (64 percent). All S. aureus isolates were resistant to penicillin, while most (64 percent) were resistant to piperacillin; the most effective drugs against bacteria were vancomycin and imipenem.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that the local government regulatory food and public health authorities should take immediate emergency measures. Appropriate surveillance studies and periodic monitoring of food items should be regularly performed to safeguard public health.

Originality/value

The current study revealed the prevalence of multidrug-resistant bacteria in freshly prepared fruit juices sold by local street vendors.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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