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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2021

G. Rejikumar, Asokan-Ajitha Aswathy, Ajay Jose and Mathew Sonia

Innovative restaurant service designs impart food wellbeing to diners. This research comprehends customer aspirations and concerns in a restaurant-dining experience to…

Abstract

Purpose

Innovative restaurant service designs impart food wellbeing to diners. This research comprehends customer aspirations and concerns in a restaurant-dining experience to develop a service design that enhances the dining experience using the design thinking approach and evaluates its efficiency using the Taguchi method of robust design.

Design/methodology/approach

The sequential incidence technique defines diners' needs, which, followed by brainstorming sessions, helped create multiple service designs with important attributes. Prototype narration, as a scenario, acted as the stimulus for evaluators to respond to the WHO-5 wellbeing index scale. Scenario-based Taguchi experiment with nine foodservice attributes in two levels and the wellbeing score as the response variable helped identify levels of critical factors that develop better FWB.

Findings

The study identified the best combination of factors and their preferred levels to maximize FWB in a restaurant. Food serving hygiene, followed by information about cuisine specification, and food movement in the restaurant, were important to FWB. The experiment revealed that hygiene perceptions are critical to FWB, and service designs have a significant role in it. Consumers prefer detailed information about the ingredients and recipe of the food they eat; being confident that there will be no unacceptable ingredients added to the food inspires their FWB.

Research limitations/implications

Theoretically, this study contributes to the growing body of literature on design thinking and transformative service research, especially in the food industry.

Practical implications

This paper details a simple method to identify and evaluate important factors that optimize FWB in a restaurant. The proposed methodology will help service designers and technology experts devise settings that consider customer priorities and contribute to their experience.

Originality/value

This study helps to understand the application of design thinking and the Taguchi approach for creating robust service designs that optimize FWB.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Sarah Maddock and Beverley Hill

The relationship between food and mood has been discussed for many years. The purpose of this paper is to extend that debate by exploring how food advertising, a key…

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1315

Abstract

Purpose

The relationship between food and mood has been discussed for many years. The purpose of this paper is to extend that debate by exploring how food advertising, a key source of consumer information about food, utilises and implies varied associations between food and mood.

Design/methodology/approach

The research combines a textually oriented analysis with an analysis of the visual images in a sample of typical food advertisements drawn from women’s magazines.

Findings

Although healthy foods have the potential to enhance mood this is not often used as a key advertising message. Conversely, advertisements for foods that can depress mood frequently adopt messages of happiness and wellbeing.

Research limitations/implications

This exploratory research provides an initial investigation of advertising discourses of food and mood at a snapshot in time. Based on the findings derived from this limited sample, further research is suggested which would provide a more comprehensive survey of food advertising.

Practical implications

The research is of value to food promoters in suggesting that they review food messages and the use of emotional appeals in the light of developing scientific research on the link between food and mental wellbeing.

Social implications

The growing interest in promoting mental health and wellbeing means that consumers and governments are keen to understand the relationship between food and mood and its potential influence on consumer food choices.

Originality/value

This research indicates that some food advertising diverges from the scientific evidence on food and mental health and wellbeing. The research is therefore of value to food promoters and advertising regulators.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Stephen T.T. Teo, Diep Nguyen, Azadeh Shafaei and Tim Bentley

Drawing from the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) framework and Conservation of Resources (COR) theory, the authors’ study examines the impact of high commitment HR management…

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1280

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing from the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) framework and Conservation of Resources (COR) theory, the authors’ study examines the impact of high commitment HR management (HCHRM) practices and psychological capital (PsyCap) on job autonomy and job demands in predicting burnout in frontline food service employees.

Design/methodology/approach

A moderated mediation model was developed and tested on 257 Australian workers employed in the food service industry. Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

There was support for the mediation effect of HCHRM on burnout, via two sequential mediators: job autonomy and job demands. PsyCap was found to buffer (moderation) the effect of job demands on burnout. Frontline employees also perceived HCHRM to be a “negative signal” that was implemented for the good of management.

Research limitations/implications

The authors are aware of the potential of common method variance due to the cross-sectional research design. Future research should adopt a longitudinal research design or collect data from several sources of informants. As the authors did not find support for the optimistic perspective hypothesis, despite its theoretical and empirical relevance under JD-R and COR perspectives, they call for further research exploring the link between HRM, job design and psychological conditions in promoting employee wellbeing.

Practical implications

Burnout is one of the most common and critical health issues faced by frontline food service employees. Food service organizations have to strategize their management practices to reduce employees' experience with burnout by implementing high commitment enhancing HR practices and developing employees' PsyCap.

Originality/value

This study provided a better understanding of how (macro) HCHRM practices as an organizational resource reduce burnout of frontline food service employees via two (micro) mediators: job autonomy and job demands. PsyCap is an important personal resource that lessens burnout, consistent with the COR theory. These findings contribute to the literature on strategic HRM and its relationship to employee wellbeing.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 43 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Book part
Publication date: 29 June 2017

Jeffery Sobal

Food system channels are proposed to be major components of the larger food system which influence health and illness.

Abstract

Purpose

Food system channels are proposed to be major components of the larger food system which influence health and illness.

Methodology/approach

Food system channels are defined, discussed in relationship to other food system components, considered in terms of historical food system changes, examined in relationship to wellbeing and disease, and proposed to have useful applications.

Findings

Food system channels are broad, organized, and integrated pathways through which foods and nutrients pass. Channels are larger in scale and scope than previously described food system structures like chains, stages, sectors, networks, and others. Four major types of contemporary Western food system channels differ in their underlying values and health impacts. (1) Industrialized food channels are based on profit as an economic value, which contributes to a diversity of inexpensive foods and chronic diseases. (2) Emergency food channels are based on altruism as a moral value, and try to overcome gaps in industrialized channels to prevent diseases of poverty. (3) Alternative food channels are based on justice and environmentalism as ethical values, and seek to promote wellness and sustainability. (4) Subsistence food channels are based on self-sufficiency as a traditional value, and seek self-reliance to avoid hunger and illness. Historical socioeconomic development of agricultural and industrial transitions led to shifts in food system channels that shaped dietary, nutritional, epidemiological, and mortality transitions.

Implications

Food system channels provide varying amounts of calories and types of nutrients that shape wellbeing and diseases. Sociologists and others may benefit from examining food system channels and considering their role in health and illness.

Details

Food Systems and Health
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-092-3

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2018

Archana P. Voola, Ranjit Voola, Jessica Wyllie, Jamie Carlson and Srinivas Sridharan

This paper aims to investigate dynamics of food consumption practices among poor families in a developing country to advance the Food Well-being (FWB) in Poverty framework.

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1020

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate dynamics of food consumption practices among poor families in a developing country to advance the Food Well-being (FWB) in Poverty framework.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design used semi-structured interviews with 25 women and constructivist grounded theory to explore food consumption practices of poor families in rural South India.

Findings

Poor families’ everyday interactions with food reveal the relational production of masculinities and femininities and the power hegemony that fixes men and women into an unequal status quo. Findings provides critical insights into familial arrangements in absolute poverty that are detrimental to the task of achieving FWB.

Research limitations/implications

The explanatory potential of FWB in Poverty framework is limited to a gender (women) and a specific country context (India). Future research can contextualise the framework in other developing countries and different consumer segments.

Practical implications

The FWB in Poverty framework helps identify, challenge and transform cultural norms, social structures and gendered stereotypes that perpetuate power hegemonies in poverty. Policymakers can encourage men and boys to participate in family food work, as well as recognise and remunerate women and girls for their contribution to maintaining familial units.

Originality/value

This paper makes an original contribution to the relevant literature by identifying and addressing the absence of theoretical understanding of families, food consumption and poverty. By contextualising the FWB framework in absolute poverty, the paper generates novel understandings of fluidity and change in poor families and FWB.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 17 December 2020

Gloria Essilfie, Joshua Sebu, Samuel Kobina Annim and Emmanuel Ekow Asmah

This study adopts three dimensions of women’s empowerment: (1) relative education empowerment, (2) women's autonomy in decision-making and (3) domestic violence to examine…

Abstract

Purpose

This study adopts three dimensions of women’s empowerment: (1) relative education empowerment, (2) women's autonomy in decision-making and (3) domestic violence to examine the effect of women’s empowerment on household food security in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed the generalised ordered logit model (GOLM) and dominance analysis using a sample of 1,017 households from the seventh round of Ghana Living Standard Survey (GLSS7).

Findings

The findings from the study revealed that women’s empowerment proxied by relative years of schooling and women's decision-making were important indicators for improving household food security. Further, there exist varying dimensions of women’s empowerment in households, and these dimensions have a significant effect on the state of food security of households.

Originality/value

There are a number of studies on the effect of women's empowerment on food security. However, this study contributes to the literature by examining the varying effects of different dimensions of women’s empowerment on food security. This provides policymakers with a guide that looks at different levels of women’s empowerment and the combinations of women's empowerment dimensions that contribute for reducing food insecurity.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 48 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2018

Anna Ross, Nicola Reavley, Lay San Too and Jane Pirkis

The purpose of this paper is to describe an evaluation of the Community Stations Project. The Community Stations Project was designed to address railway suicides in two…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe an evaluation of the Community Stations Project. The Community Stations Project was designed to address railway suicides in two ways: by improving the station environment in a manner that might improve community members’ feelings of wellbeing; and raising community members’ awareness of poor mental health and likelihood of reaching out to at-risk individuals. It involved four types of interventions (arts and culture, music, food and coffee, and “special events”) delivered at four stations in Victoria.

Design/methodology/approach

A short anonymous survey was administered to community members on iPads at the four participating railway stations during the implementation of the interventions (between October and December 2016). The survey included questions about respondents’ demographics, their awareness of the intervention(s), their views of the station, their attitudes towards people with poor mental health and their emotional wellbeing.

Findings

A total of 1,309 people took part in the survey. Of these, 48 per cent of community members surveyed reporting noticing an intervention at their station. Noticing the events was associated with positive views of the station, improved understanding of poor mental health, and a greater likelihood of reaching out to someone who might be at risk of poor mental health. Awareness of intervention events was not associated with respondents’ own emotional wellbeing.

Practical implications

Continuing to focus efforts on mental health awareness activities may further strengthen the impact of the Community Stations Project interventions and ultimately prevent suicides at railway stations.

Originality/value

This paper evaluates a novel approach to improving wellbeing and understanding of poor mental health in the train station environment.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2011

Masudul Alam Choudhury

This paper aims to address the important issue of world food pricing from a new perspective of demand, supply production and preferences.

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5893

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address the important issue of world food pricing from a new perspective of demand, supply production and preferences.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews the models of demand and supply and introduces the author's own modeling idea in this field of global food pricing and production.

Findings

There is no such thing as permanent food scarcity, and that food scarcity is as much an ethical problem as is artificially generated scarcity of the good things of life, the basic needs of life, on which life has a fair share. The paper goes on to explain a relational model of learning to understand complementarities between the basic needs, amongst which essentially is food as a globally provisioned social good. Also endemic in this transformation are the preferences that conscious consumers ought to have, the production that appropriate technology should bring about, and the supply as an elastic function of price in a basic‐needs regime of food production and pricing.

Research limitations/implications

Further statistical data needed for estimation.

Practical implications

The paper explains such a relational model of ethically‐induced perspectives on food demand, supply, production and pricing. The paper then investigates how the same issues can be examined in the conventional large‐scale econometric models against the data that are available. The paper suggests revisions in such econometric models in the light of the ethically‐induced relational model for understanding the issues underlying food demand, production, supply and pricing.

Social implications

Several philosophical questions in regard to the appropriateness of the conventional models that fall short of addressing such essential issues, and thus also fail to predict behavior and forecast future, are examined. Some policy, program and strategic implications of the study are pointed out in the analytical conclusion.

Originality/value

The paper goes on to explain a relational model of learning to understand complementarities between the basic needs, amongst which essentially is food as a globally provisioned social good. Also endemic in this transformation are the preferences that conscious consumers ought to have, the production that appropriate technology should bring about, and the supply as an elastic function of price in a basic‐needs regime of food production and pricing. The paper explains such a relational model of ethically‐induced perspectives on food demand, supply, production and pricing. The paper then investigates how the same issues can be examined in the conventional large‐scale econometric models against the data that are available.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2021

Fiorella Pia Salvatore, Nino Adamashvili and Francesco Contò

The main aims are underlining the role of functional foods (FFs) for population wellbeing, investigating the reasons in the self-consciousness of the different countries'…

Abstract

Purpose

The main aims are underlining the role of functional foods (FFs) for population wellbeing, investigating the reasons in the self-consciousness of the different countries' populations and exploring what influences in purchasing decisions to address the management of food-producing businesses. This information will make consumer management easier.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-step methodology was adopted: (1) literature review and (2) online interview. The principal component analysis (PCA) was used to facilitate and reduce the data complexity. Software Stata/SE was used for data analysis in both Italy and Georgia.

Findings

Customers' attitudes, awareness level and decision-making process are clarified through the comparative analysis between Italian and Georgian populations. They have a number of reasons that incentivize their behavior. These reasons may be used by food-producing businesses to evaluate their performance and develop ad hoc strategies for consumer management.

Originality/value

The key elements that determine the FF and motivate the consumer to buy can constitute a foundation for actions related to the development and management of food-producing businesses. Knowing the factors that consumers consider in the process of choosing FFs will help define the strategies that businesses should use for product improvement, better managing the consumer. This study can support the development of education, prevention and promotion of managerial improvements. The innovative mixed methodology applied to the topic is one of the original factors of the study.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2013

C.R. Symonds, A.C. Martins and H.J. Hartwell

Numerous factors can influence an individual's eating behaviour, including the environment where food is purchased and consumed; this has been termed the foodscape…

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1012

Abstract

Purpose

Numerous factors can influence an individual's eating behaviour, including the environment where food is purchased and consumed; this has been termed the foodscape. Settings where meals are consumed by the same people habitually, such as that of workplaces, can significantly impact individuals' overall diets, highlighting an opportunity to improve their health. The aim of this study is to investigate the extent to which the foodscape within a university influences consumer food choice, both students and staff.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach was taken where ten interviews were conducted with staff (n=5) and students (n=5) in a university establishment. Interviews were transcribed and analysed thematically. Codes were sorted into overarching research categories bringing meaning to the data, which could then be used in conjunction with outlet mapping.

Findings

Results demonstrate that generally consumers were fairly healthy conscious; however, their behaviour did not reflect this. Personal factors were identified and it was also felt that the environment was not supportive or encouraging of healthy eating practices.

Originality/value

The study concluded that while consumers are ultimately responsible for the lifestyle behaviour they lead, the environment has a significant opportunity to encourage healthy behaviour, a fact that is not always embraced by employers. There are a number of underlying or embedded issues in subjects which surfaced during the interview stage of the study. This work, therefore, contributes towards the body of knowledge in the understanding of the role of the foodscape within a workplace setting.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 43 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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