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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Michelle Phillipov

The increasing frequency with which food and beverage producers feature in mainstream media, including television cooking shows, provide opportunities and pitfalls for…

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Abstract

Purpose

The increasing frequency with which food and beverage producers feature in mainstream media, including television cooking shows, provide opportunities and pitfalls for using media to promote artisan food and beverage businesses. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate these, as experienced by a group of food and beverage producers who appeared on the popular Australian television show, Gourmet Farmer.

Design/methodology/approach

Findings are based on semi-structured interviews with 14 of the producers featured on the show, plus textual analysis of relevant segments of the show.

Findings

While all of the producers felt that food television offered a good promotional tool, those who were most familiar with the practices of media production and whose businesses offered experiences through which viewers could access (or imagine) a “taste” of the Gourmet Farmer life tended to be more satisfied than those who were less familiar with the practices of media production and who expected a greater focus on their products and production practices.

Practical implications

The development of media skills is essential for artisan producers to get the best outcomes when using media to promote their businesses.

Originality/value

The experiences of food and beverage producers using food television to promote their businesses have not previously been the subject of thoroughgoing research. This paper offers new insights into how artisan producers can best capitalize on the opportunities offered by food media.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Roger Dickinson

Describes the background to and main findings from a three‐year MAFF‐funded research project on the role of television in the food choices of young people. The project…

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3718

Abstract

Describes the background to and main findings from a three‐year MAFF‐funded research project on the role of television in the food choices of young people. The project examined the nature and extent of television’s portrayal of food and eating and investigated young people’s interpretations of this. The findings indicate that food and eating are portrayed very frequently on UK television, but that the “message” in programmes contrasts with the “message” in advertising in terms of the nutritional content of the foods depicted. This disorder and contradiction are reflected in young viewers’ accounts of their own eating habits.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2010

Futoshi Kobayashi

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between daily television viewing duration and weekly fast food intake of American and Japanese college students.

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1468

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between daily television viewing duration and weekly fast food intake of American and Japanese college students.

Design/methodology/approach

From the archival database of lifestyle study (Kobayashi, 2007), the relevant variables were chosen and reanalyzed.

Findings

In 222 Japanese participants, there were no significant differences between the infrequent (less than 60 min) and the frequent (60 min and more) television viewers regarding their weekly fast food intake. However, in 147 American participants, the frequent (60 min and more) television viewers indicated significantly larger intake of fast food per week than the infrequent (less than 60 min) television viewers.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the limited sample size, the results of this study might lack generalizability. Further research on this issue should be conducted in the future.

Practical implications

The findings suggested possible influences of television viewing upon fast food intake of American college students.

Originality/value

There were few studies that investigated the media effects on fast food intake of both American and Japanese college students. This study might be the first one.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2010

Caroline J. Oates and Nicki Newman

This paper aims to identify the different types of food featured on children's television in the UK and how frequently they appear.

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1433

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the different types of food featured on children's television in the UK and how frequently they appear.

Design/methodology/approach

A content analysis of children's television across four popular UK channels (CBBC, CBeebies, CiTV, Five) was carried out in Autumn 2008. All output including programmes, advertisements, sponsorship, trailers and idents was examined for verbal and visual instances of food and drink. Food and drink mentions were classified according to food categories.

Findings

The results showed a high incidence of food across the different kinds of output and across the four channels. In programmes, food mentions were skewed towards healthy (68.7 per cent v. 31.3 per cent) rather than unhealthy foods. The most frequent categories of food were fruit and vegetables, desserts, and grains.

Research limitations/implications

The findings presented here are based on four channels, and analysis of 84 hours of television content aimed at children. The study represents a qualitative picture based on a limited sample at a specific point in time.

Practical implications

The results demonstrate that Ofcom's latest UK guidelines on television advertising of HFSS foods are being adhered to during children's programmes, and question whether programming and other types of output offer a positive or negative view of food and whether they too require intervention.

Originality/value

The results widen the debate about obesity and television advertising by considering the importance of editorial content and other marketing communications in terms of food portrayal on children's television.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1997

Roger Dickinson and Simon Leader

Describes the main research objectives and reports on some findings from a Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries, and Food (MAFF) funded research project on the role of…

Abstract

Describes the main research objectives and reports on some findings from a Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries, and Food (MAFF) funded research project on the role of television in food choice, currently in its second year. Begins by outlining the rationale for the study and presents some preliminary analysis of data obtained from a survey of some 200 11‐18 year olds.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 99 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Roger Dickinson and Simon Leader

Describes the main research objectives and reports on some findings from a Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF)‐funded research project on the role of…

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1490

Abstract

Describes the main research objectives and reports on some findings from a Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF)‐funded research project on the role of television in food choice, currently in its second year. Begins by outlining the rationale for the study and presents some preliminary analysis of data obtained from a survey of some 200 11‐18 year‐olds.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 96 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Carol Byrd‐Bredbenner and Darlene Grasso

The purpose of this study was to describe the content of food advertisements broadcast during prime‐time network programs and determine what changes have occurred over the…

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2330

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to describe the content of food advertisements broadcast during prime‐time network programs and determine what changes have occurred over the last 30 years. The sample comprised foods advertisements (N = 38, N = 31, N = 91, N = 105, N = 108) from 1971, 1977, 1988, 1992 and 1998, respectively. Of the commercials shown in 1977, 1988, 1992 and 1998, 31, 35, 20, and 15 per cent, respectively, were for food advertisements (data were unavailable for 1971). Using simple linear regression, the hourly rate for total commercials is increasing significantly (p = 0.04) by 1.4 commercials per hour each year. However, the hourly rate for food advertisements is not changing over time in a statistically significant fashion. There is very strong evidence of an association between the type of food advertised and year (chi‐square = 62.691, p < 0.001). The top four categories contributing to the chi‐square are: restaurants, low‐nutrient beverages, protein‐rich foods, and breads and cereals which, together, account for 75 per cent of the chi‐square value. For the past three decades, the “prime‐time diet” has comprised mostly low nutrient density foods that are promoted by slender, healthy actors.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2007

Randy M. Page and Aaron Brewster

The purpose of the current study is to identify the extent to which promotional strategies and attention elements appear in a sample of children's food commercials.

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1894

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the current study is to identify the extent to which promotional strategies and attention elements appear in a sample of children's food commercials.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was a content analysis study of 147 commercials that examined 20 separate promotional strategies and 20 different attention elements. The sample of commercials included those appearing on five US broadcast networks during children's programming blocks.

Findings

Findings show that the most frequently used promotional strategies were the use of jingles/slogans, showing children with the food, and the use of product identification characters. The use of animation, “real children,” and animal characters were the most used attention elements in the commercials.

Research limitations/implications

The sample of commercials used in this analysis was obtained from broadcast networks and did not include cable network programming; however, the commercials represent commercials from a wide variety of food products and food product categories. Although not determined empirically, the same commercials appeared to air on the broadcast and cable networks.

Practical implications

Health and nutrition educators can draw on this study's findings by applying this information in creating more effective nutrition and health promotion messages designed to counter promotional strategies and attention elements in advertising messages that are addressed in this study.

Originality/value

Although specific promotional strategies and attention elements found in children's food commercials have been identified, there have been no studies addressing the frequency of these strategies/elements among a sample of commercials.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 4 August 2014

Pavleen Soni and Jyoti Vohra

A large number of food advertisements are broadcast during children ' s programs which influence their food consumption habits. Globally, consumption of these foods

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1964

Abstract

Purpose

A large number of food advertisements are broadcast during children ' s programs which influence their food consumption habits. Globally, consumption of these foods is linked to increased incidence of obesity and other health-related disorders in children. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to explore the nature and extent of food advertising directed at Indian children.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by recording programs and advertisements aired on five popular children ' s networks from 9:00 am until 9:00 pm for ten weekdays and weekends each. On an average, total recording of 242 hours for both weekdays and weekends was done. All data were screened and both program and non-program content (advertisements) were identified and analyzed. Data were further analyzed through descriptive statistics.

Findings

Out of 4,219 and 4,750 television advertisements broadcast on children ' s networks during weekdays and weekends, 43.33 and 47.62 percent are food advertisements, respectively. “Confectionery” and “sugared and salty snacks” comprise half of total foods advertised during weekdays. Whereas, advertisements for “health drinks and supplements” are most frequently aired during children ' s programs on weekends. A classification of all food advertisements into healthy and unhealthy categories according to “Food Pyramid” given by National Institute of Nutrition (NIN), India in 2010 shows that almost all the advertised foods are unhealthy.

Practical implications

This study will benefit the parents by helping them understand the media content (food advertisements) offered to their children. They may then control television viewing by children, monitor food purchase behavior and take some mealtime actions to control eating habits of their children. Such awareness is critical to force the food marketers to recognize the need to self-regulate food advertising directed at children. Government may also feel the need to formulate a suitable policy for placing time and content restrictions for advertising foods to children.

Originality/value

As no such study has already been conducted in India (to the best of researcher ' s knowledge), this study potentially helps in abridging gaps in literature.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Donna Winham and Jeffrey S. Hampl

Social cognitive theory (SCT) suggests that the observation of role models prompts the formation of beliefs that will govern future behaviors. The paper's objective is to…

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2099

Abstract

Purpose

Social cognitive theory (SCT) suggests that the observation of role models prompts the formation of beliefs that will govern future behaviors. The paper's objective is to explore the perceived influence of television media on feelings about eating habits, body image, clothing styles, and physical attractiveness attributes by high schools students in terms of SCT.

Design/methodology/approach

Data on attitudes and perceptions were collected using an online survey of a convenience sample of high school students (n=467) to determine influence of television media characters on behaviors.

Findings

The results of this survey suggest that high school students do not indiscriminately model behaviors depicted by television programs, but may selectively incorporate some views that fit with their reality such as the importance of attractiveness in romantic partners, but not influences of clothing styles or eating habits.

Research limitations/implications

Recognition of the fictional quality of television characters does not refute that they have influence on the high school respondents, but it does suggest some degree of cognitive recognition about the lack of reality of television characters. The convenience sample of adolescents may be more media‐savvy than others because of associations with high‐school journalism programs.

Originality/value

High school students do not indiscriminately model behaviors depicted by television programs, but may selectively incorporate some views that fit with their reality in accordance with SCT.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

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