Search results

1 – 10 of over 52000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 October 2021

G. Rejikumar, Asokan-Ajitha Aswathy, Ajay Jose and Mathew Sonia

Innovative restaurant service designs impart food wellbeing to diners. This research comprehends customer aspirations and concerns in a restaurant-dining experience to…

Abstract

Purpose

Innovative restaurant service designs impart food wellbeing to diners. This research comprehends customer aspirations and concerns in a restaurant-dining experience to develop a service design that enhances the dining experience using the design thinking approach and evaluates its efficiency using the Taguchi method of robust design.

Design/methodology/approach

The sequential incidence technique defines diners' needs, which, followed by brainstorming sessions, helped create multiple service designs with important attributes. Prototype narration, as a scenario, acted as the stimulus for evaluators to respond to the WHO-5 wellbeing index scale. Scenario-based Taguchi experiment with nine foodservice attributes in two levels and the wellbeing score as the response variable helped identify levels of critical factors that develop better FWB.

Findings

The study identified the best combination of factors and their preferred levels to maximize FWB in a restaurant. Food serving hygiene, followed by information about cuisine specification, and food movement in the restaurant, were important to FWB. The experiment revealed that hygiene perceptions are critical to FWB, and service designs have a significant role in it. Consumers prefer detailed information about the ingredients and recipe of the food they eat; being confident that there will be no unacceptable ingredients added to the food inspires their FWB.

Research limitations/implications

Theoretically, this study contributes to the growing body of literature on design thinking and transformative service research, especially in the food industry.

Practical implications

This paper details a simple method to identify and evaluate important factors that optimize FWB in a restaurant. The proposed methodology will help service designers and technology experts devise settings that consider customer priorities and contribute to their experience.

Originality/value

This study helps to understand the application of design thinking and the Taguchi approach for creating robust service designs that optimize FWB.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Svetlana Rodgers

The paper aims to provide a better understanding of food service technologies, applied research and technical literacy needs in hospitality.

Downloads
7891

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to provide a better understanding of food service technologies, applied research and technical literacy needs in hospitality.

Design/methodology/approach

Reviews the applied research in food services and the technical literacy needed to interpret and benefit from it.

Findings

The summary of research is provided in the subject areas identified by QAAHE (2000): food safety management, food quality management and product development; equipment and facility layout/design; operational planning and modelling; as well as market and consumer related aspects. Underpinning scientific disciplines and operational/ strategic benefits of the described studies as well as the three tiers in the educational pathways in food production are described.

Practical implications

The research findings can be used as a source of competency‐building by practitioners and educators.

Originality/value

The paper identifies the main types of research and develops conceptual links between the scientific fundamentals of food service operations and industry practices.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Dominik Mahr, Nikos Kalogeras and Gaby Odekerken‐Schröder

Insufficient attention to the specific nature of healthy food experiences might limit the success of related innovations. The purpose of this article is to adopt a…

Downloads
2330

Abstract

Purpose

Insufficient attention to the specific nature of healthy food experiences might limit the success of related innovations. The purpose of this article is to adopt a value‐in‐use perspective to conceptualize healthy food consumption as experiential and emotional, rather than the mere intake of nutrition, and to examine the development of healthy food communication with a service science approach.

Design/methodology/approach

With a service science approach, this study proposes a virtual healthy food platform for children. The key data come from internal project documents, workshops with children and other stakeholders (e.g. parents, teachers), and interviews with project team members.

Findings

The simultaneity of functional and hedonic benefits, implications for multiple stakeholders, social norms, and need for expertise characterize healthy food experiences. The proposed framework accounts for enablers, principles, outcomes, and challenges affecting the development of communication integral to healthy food experiences, using project data and tools as illustrations.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to growing literature on service science by introducing key principles and contingency factors that influence the success of experience‐centric service innovations. Quantitative research should validate the established framework and investigate the elements' relative usefulness for developing healthy food communication.

Practical implications

The service science approach involves multiple stakeholders, empathic data collection, and visual tools to develop an entertaining platform to help children learn about healthy food.

Originality/value

This research conceptualizes and validates healthy food experiences as value‐in‐use offerings. The proposed service science approach accounts for the interactions among stakeholders, the holistic nature, and specificities of a real‐life decision context for improving healthy food experiences.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 November 2021

Aarni Tuomi and Mário Passos Ascenção

Automation poses to change how service work is organized. However, there is a lack of understanding of how automation influences specific sectors, including specific…

Abstract

Purpose

Automation poses to change how service work is organized. However, there is a lack of understanding of how automation influences specific sectors, including specific hospitality jobs. Addressing this gap, this paper looks at the relative automatability of jobs and tasks which fall within one specific hospitality context: frontline food service.

Design/methodology/approach

Study 1 analyzes the UK Office for National Statistics' Standard Occupational Classification (2020) data to determine the degree to which frontline food service jobs consist of tasks requiring mechanical, analytical, intuitive or empathetic intelligence. Study 2 contrasts these findings to current state of intelligent automation technology development through interviews and a focus group with food service technology experts (n = 13).

Findings

Of all the tasks listed under food service in the ONS SOC 2020, 58.8% are found to require mechanical, 26.8% analytical, 11.3% intuitive and 3.1% empathetic intelligence. Further, the automatability of these tasks is found to be driven by three streams of technology development in particular: (1) autonomous navigation, (2) object manipulation and (3) natural language processing.

Originality/value

Hospitality management literature has started to conceptualize a move from mechanical and analytical service tasks to tasks centered around intuition and empathy. While previous studies have adopted a general view to what this might mean for hospitality jobs, this paper develops a novel, task-centric framework for Actioning Intelligent Automation in Frontline Food Service.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Milos Bujisic, Joe Hutchinson and H.G. Parsa

– The purpose of this paper was to investigate the relationships between restaurant quality attributes and customer behavioral intentions.

Downloads
10950

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to investigate the relationships between restaurant quality attributes and customer behavioral intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental design was chosen to provide a high level of internal validity. Three separate 3 × 2 factorial design experiments were conducted through 18 separate vignette scenarios for three levels of quality (below average, average and above average) of three common restaurant attributes (food, service and ambience) in two types of restaurants (quick service and upscale).

Findings

The results indicated that the type of restaurant moderated the relationship between restaurant service and ambience quality and customer behavioral intentions.

Practical implications

The results of this study suggest that management of quick-service and upscale restaurants should focus on food quality, but establish different resource allocation priorities with respect to service and ambience quality.

Originality/value

This study examined the linearity of the relationships between three common restaurant attributes (food, service and ambience) for three levels of quality (below average, average and above average) in two types of restaurants (quick service and upscale).

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Mihyun Kang, Paulette Robert Hebert, Rebekah Thompsen and Abby VanDusen

The purpose of this study was to investigate and document existing lighting systems and lighting levels, to compare findings to the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to investigate and document existing lighting systems and lighting levels, to compare findings to the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) lighting standards (Rodgers, 1998) and to make lighting recommendation for energy and cost savings.

Design/methodology/approach

Lighting examinations and field measurements were conducted at a large, existing Midwestern institutional food-service facility that has been continuously operational since 1976. Lighting levels of the dining room, checkout line, buffet, kitchen, storage room and conference room were measured and then compared to the IES lighting standards. Recommendations were then made for energy and cost savings.

Findings

The average light levels in the dining room, checkout line, buffet, storage room and conference room exceeded the industry-recommended light levels. The energy and cost savings were calculated for this study, and the energy- and cost-saving strategies recommended included delamping, replacing lamps and luminaires and installing occupancy sensors. If existing lighting can be updated in an energy- and cost-saving manner, institutional food-service facilities might be made appropriate through renovation, thus extending the life of these facilities.

Practical implications

This study has practical implications for the many existing institutional food service facilities in workplaces across the USA that could save energy and costs through renovated lighting systems.

Originality/value

This research constitutes an in situ case study, which gathered empirical lighting data at an existing institutional food-service facility and made recommendations for lighting renovations. Although lighting systems influence dining and kitchen environments, lighting has not always been fully considered in institutional food-service facilities.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

Claudia Paciarotti and Francesco Torregiani

The purpose of this paper is to explore the strength and weakness connected to the implementation of a local food logistics services, designed to facilitate and enable the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the strength and weakness connected to the implementation of a local food logistics services, designed to facilitate and enable the use of local food among restaurants.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 60 restaurateurs located in a small Italian city and 100 owners of micro and small-sized farms, located within a 30 km radius from the city, have been interviewed. The collected data have been analysed through descriptive analysis and Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests for differences between gender, production type and business size.

Findings

The results agree with existing literature: poor communication and an unstructured logistics limit the interaction among actors. However, significant for the purpose, the data show that producers are interested in expanding their market and restaurateurs are interested in a broader supply of local products, and they both open to a logistics service that improves the supply of local food.

Research limitations/implications

The following exploratory study is based on a sample of farmers and restaurants in a specific area so the results could not be generalised in a national/international context.

Practical implications

The logistics service objective is the promotion of a sustainable territory development in support of the social economy values.

Originality/value

The study investigates this issue focussing on a practical solution of local food distribution system among restaurants. The logistics service tends to solve the logistics criticalities maintaining the principles of the short food supply chain.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 May 2021

Wided Batat and Michela Addis

Literature from across design studies and innovation management, as well as food marketing research evidence, is examined to highlight the interdisciplinary and…

Abstract

Purpose

Literature from across design studies and innovation management, as well as food marketing research evidence, is examined to highlight the interdisciplinary and experiential research approaches to food consumption and well-being. This conceptual paper aims to address the need to expand the food industry’s goals by considering its contributions to the consumer’s overall food well-being. Food experience design (FED) seeks to understand how food professionals can design healthy and pleasurable food experiences aimed at enhancing people’s food well-being. FED does so by proposing a holistic and integrative framework.

Design/methodology/approach

This approach examines design thinking by conducting an analysis of the multidisciplinary literature. This paper addresses the gap in the literature by advancing the theoretical and empirical understanding of food design thinking through the lenses of experiential theory and consumer well-being.

Findings

This review paper clarifies the scope of FED scholarship and offers a call for collective efforts to establish a focused body of knowledge that leads food marketing professionals and scholars to adopt an experiential perspective to food consumption and production focused on experiential pleasure of food as a driving force for consumer’s well-being.

Research limitations/implications

The review paper addresses the need to expand the food industry’s goals by considering its contributions to the consumer’s overall food well-being. FED seeks to understand how food professionals can design healthy and pleasurable food experiences aimed at enhancing people’s food well-being. FED does so by proposing a holistic and integrative framework.

Practical implications

This research provides designers with the operative tools to create innovative food experiences and increase the food well-being of consumers. Toward that end, designers need to extend their skills and evolve their language and competencies to create valuable dialogues with other stakeholders involved. Collaboration requires many other premises. This paper contributes to the discussion by identifying and clarifying them.

Originality/value

This research highlights the imperative to take multidisciplinary, transformative and experiential approaches to researching food innovation strategies from a consumer’s well-being perspective.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 October 2018

Aleksandra Michalec, Martin Fodor, Enda Hayes and James Longhurst

The purpose of this paper is to present results from the action research project, where sustainability professionals, local businesses and academic researchers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present results from the action research project, where sustainability professionals, local businesses and academic researchers collaborated on exploring barriers for food waste recycling in SMEs food outlets in order to inform local policy and business practices in Bristol, UK.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers conducted face-to-face, qualitative surveys of 79 catering businesses in three diverse areas of the city. The action research methodology was applied, where a range of co-researchers contributed towards study design and review.

Findings

The research reveals the main barriers to recycling and how such perceptions differ depending on whether the respondents do or do not recycle, with “convenience” and “cost” being the main issue according to the already recycling participants. On the other hand, participants who do not recycle state that their main reason is “not enough waste” and “lack of space”.

Practical implications

Participants recommended a range of measures, which could improve the current food waste services in Bristol. For example, they suggest that business engagement should address the barriers voiced by the participants applying the framings used by them, rather than assuming restaurants and cafes are not aware of the issue. By inviting a variety of non-academic stakeholders into the process of research design and analysis, the project addressed the imbalances in knowledge production and policy design.

Originality/value

Despite the local and qualitative focus of this paper, the results and research methodology could act as a useful guide for conducting food waste action research in the policy context.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Stephen T.T. Teo, Diep Nguyen, Azadeh Shafaei and Tim Bentley

Drawing from the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) framework and Conservation of Resources (COR) theory, the authors’ study examines the impact of high commitment HR management…

Downloads
1280

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing from the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) framework and Conservation of Resources (COR) theory, the authors’ study examines the impact of high commitment HR management (HCHRM) practices and psychological capital (PsyCap) on job autonomy and job demands in predicting burnout in frontline food service employees.

Design/methodology/approach

A moderated mediation model was developed and tested on 257 Australian workers employed in the food service industry. Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

There was support for the mediation effect of HCHRM on burnout, via two sequential mediators: job autonomy and job demands. PsyCap was found to buffer (moderation) the effect of job demands on burnout. Frontline employees also perceived HCHRM to be a “negative signal” that was implemented for the good of management.

Research limitations/implications

The authors are aware of the potential of common method variance due to the cross-sectional research design. Future research should adopt a longitudinal research design or collect data from several sources of informants. As the authors did not find support for the optimistic perspective hypothesis, despite its theoretical and empirical relevance under JD-R and COR perspectives, they call for further research exploring the link between HRM, job design and psychological conditions in promoting employee wellbeing.

Practical implications

Burnout is one of the most common and critical health issues faced by frontline food service employees. Food service organizations have to strategize their management practices to reduce employees' experience with burnout by implementing high commitment enhancing HR practices and developing employees' PsyCap.

Originality/value

This study provided a better understanding of how (macro) HCHRM practices as an organizational resource reduce burnout of frontline food service employees via two (micro) mediators: job autonomy and job demands. PsyCap is an important personal resource that lessens burnout, consistent with the COR theory. These findings contribute to the literature on strategic HRM and its relationship to employee wellbeing.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 43 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 52000