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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

Adesoji O. Adelaja, Rodolfo M. Nayga, Brian J. Schilling and Karen R. Tank

Using New Jersey as a case study, this article investigates the challenges faced by food retail stores. Policy recommendations proposed by industry representatives for…

Abstract

Using New Jersey as a case study, this article investigates the challenges faced by food retail stores. Policy recommendations proposed by industry representatives for improving the business climate are also presented. Although New Jersey‐specific, many of the issues discussed in the paper may be relevant elsewhere. Consequently, the findings can be helpful in identifying broad categories of factors affecting the vitality of the industry and in designing investigative research into problems facing the food retail industry.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 27 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

Ronald W. Cotterill

Examines the exercise of market power in vertical channels. Reviews the development of food systems over the past century. Presents neoclassical models arising from the…

Abstract

Examines the exercise of market power in vertical channels. Reviews the development of food systems over the past century. Presents neoclassical models arising from the work of Adam Smith, George Stigler, Harold Demsetz and John Spengler that are in juxtaposition to the more commonly advanced agency theoretic explanation of vertical organization and performance. Develops a structural model of price transmission in a channel that has differentiated product oligopolies at two stages. Increasing concentration at successive stages creates a problem of double marginalization. Vertical trading partners reduce it by avoiding vertical Nash (arms length) pricing via the use of trade promotions and other coordination methods such as private label. Finally, the rise in retail‐buyer concentration (six supermarket chains now control 52.6 percent of supermarket sales in the USA) portends a possible shift to the European model in which food retailers develop and promote their own brands.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 103 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Samir K Srivastava, Atanu Chaudhuri and Rajiv K. Srivastava

The purpose of this paper is to carry out structural analysis of potential supply chain risks and performance measures in fresh food retail by applying interpretive…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to carry out structural analysis of potential supply chain risks and performance measures in fresh food retail by applying interpretive structural modeling (ISM).

Design/methodology/approach

Inputs were taken from industry experts in identifying and understanding interdependencies among food retail supply chain risks on different levels (sourcing and logistics outside the retail stores; storage and customer interface at the stores). Interdependencies among risks and their impact on performance measures are structured into a hierarchy in order to derive subsystems of interdependent elements to derive useful insights for theory and practice.

Findings

Using the ISM approach the risks and performance measures were clustered according to their driving power and dependence power. Change in/inadequate government regulations’ are at the bottom level of the hierarchy implying highest driving power and require higher attention and focussed mitigation strategies. Risks like lack of traceability, transport delays/breakdowns and temperature abuse, cross-contamination in transport and storage have medium driver and dependence powers.

Research limitations/implications

The approach is focussed on food retail supply chains in the Indian context and thereby limits the ability to generalize the findings. The academics and experts were selected on convenience and availability.

Practical implications

It gives managers a better understanding of the risks and performance measures that have most influence on others (driving performance measures) and those measures which are most influenced by others (dependent performance measures) in fresh food retail and also a tool to prioritize them. This kind of information is strategic for managers who can use it to identify which performance measures they should concentrate on managing the trade-offs between measures. The findings and the applicability for practical use have been validated by both experts and practicing managers in food retail supply chains.

Originality/value

The work is perhaps the first to link supply chain risks with performance and explains the propagation of risks in food retail supply chains. It contributes to theory by addressing a few research gaps and provides relevant managerial insights for practitioners.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Neil Wrigley

A two‐component framework for strategic marketing research, focused on the corporate level and the business‐unit level, to structure an interpretation of the strategic…

Abstract

A two‐component framework for strategic marketing research, focused on the corporate level and the business‐unit level, to structure an interpretation of the strategic dimensions of the acquisition in November 1998 of Star Markets, a Boston, USA‐based food retail chain, by J. Sainsbury plc the UK’s second largest food retailer. Set within a broader context of the wave of acquisition‐driven consolidation rapidly transforming the US food retail industry during the late 1990s, the paper considers the extent to which the acquisition of Star Markets represented a strategic fit with Sainsbury’s existing US business, the alternative strategies available to the company at the time of the acquisition, and the resulting strategic centrality of the US business to Sainsbury’s corporate future. Focuses on the highly contested nature of the retail internationalization process and issues of sustaining international expansion during periods of retrenchment and strategic reassessment. Highlights the tensions which can be created within the portfolio of business units of a large multidivisional firm during the internationalization process, and the stresses in the relationship between management and the capital markets which can develop if the internationalization process is perceived, correctly or incorrectly, to threaten the strategic credibility of the firm.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 34 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Case study
Publication date: 21 September 2016

Aman Jhaveri and A. Anantharaman

Strategic management.

Abstract

Subject area

Strategic management.

Study level/applicability

Entry-level post-graduate management students at an MBA program; middle-level professionals in an executive management program.

Case overview

Royal India Food Retail (RIFR) is an organized food retailer, head-quartered in Delhi, India. The firm has established 180 outlets across the three Indian states of Delhi, Chandigarh and Punjab, selling fruits and vegetables, full-range of staples, grocery items and essential non-food items and fast-moving consumer good products. Since its inception, RIFR has been making losses, owing to both unfavourable external conditions and poor strategic management. In 2014-2015, RIFR reported earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) loss of Rs 46m as against Rs 276m in 2013-2014 and Rs 346m in 2012-2013. This case examines the problems of RIFR, against the backdrop of an unfavourable industry structure and the need for astute decision making, and poses the question of what the next step for RIFR should be.

Expected learning outcomes

Developing a clear understanding of the business environment; understanding the challenges faced by businesses in emerging markets; highlighting the dynamics of a volume-driven vis-à-vis a margin-driven approach to business strategy; and the importance of resources as critical elements of strategy development.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Linn Viktoria Rampl, Tim Eberhardt, Reinhard Schütte and Peter Kenning

The rising number of food safety scandals during recent years has led to increased uncertainty about food consumption choices. Additionally, new production process…

Abstract

Purpose

The rising number of food safety scandals during recent years has led to increased uncertainty about food consumption choices. Additionally, new production process technologies, increased attention toward product ingredients, and obesity concerns have affected general levels of trust in food. Consequently, trust is an ever more decisive factor for success in food industry buyer‐seller relationships and, hence, in the retail food market. Although considerable research has investigated trust in organizations, research in the food retailing industry needs further investigation. The aim of this paper is to identify variables related to consumer trust in food retailers. Only when consumer trust in food retailers is understood can retailers effectively apply corresponding strategies to secure long‐term success.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on an established model of trust in organizations, the authors developed a questionnaire to test drivers (ability, benevolence, integrity), outcomes (risk taking, loyalty) of specific trust in food retailers, as well as moderators (propensity to trust, perceived risk).

Findings

Study results support the hypothesized model, showing that specific trust in a food retailer strongly predicts risk taking and, in turn, loyalty. The food retailer's ability and integrity were identified as relevant to specific trust, while the customer's propensity to trust was shown to moderate the relationship between benevolence and specific trust. The results further indicate that the perceived risk affects the relationship between specific trust and risk taking.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to apply and test an established model of trust in the foodretailing market.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

John L. Stanton

The purpose of this paper is to provide a historic perspective on the supermarket industry that has changed from the small Mom and Pop stores to major supermarket chains.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a historic perspective on the supermarket industry that has changed from the small Mom and Pop stores to major supermarket chains.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is a review of secondary information from trade literature, popular new media and academic publications.

Findings

The changes in supermarkets and food stores followed the trends in how consumers have changed and developed. As consumers around the world continue to change, so will food retailers.

Research limitations/implications

The author could have included more on the development in underdeveloped countries.

Practical implications

This paper has practical implication in that to understand that food retailers must continue to follow consumer and technology changes if they want to grow and prosper. To quote Winston Churchill, “The farther backward you can look, the farther forward you are likely to see.”

Social implications

Supermarkets must be responsive to consumer changes and as consumer become more demanding for convenience so must supermarkets must continue to provide it or disappear.

Originality/value

This study is original to the extent that it brought together the different eras in supermarket. The actual changes have been well known.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2018

Ferry Jie and Denise Gengatharen

The Australian retail food sector, comprising mostly small enterprises, is undergoing change as a result of the innovative supply chain approach adopted. This change has…

Abstract

Purpose

The Australian retail food sector, comprising mostly small enterprises, is undergoing change as a result of the innovative supply chain approach adopted. This change has implications across the entire food value chain in Australia. The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the adoption of supply chain management practices on small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in the Australian food retail industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The study surveys 120 SME retailers in the food sector. A stepwise multiple regression using SPSS version 14.0 was performed on the data.

Findings

Statistical results suggest that lean thinking and the quality of information shared can lead to greater efficient supply chain performance.

Research limitations/implications

The small sample is the main limitation. The findings bear important implications for further research as understanding these dimensions can help to position key changes and industry improvement that will increase revenue and reduce cost to the SMEs in the food retail supply chain.

Practical implications

Adopting lean thinking and improving information sharing in the supply chain can reduce the cost for SMEs.

Social implications

This study has unique implications for social sustainability, especially the smaller food enterprises, which are hard pressed to combat the challenges within the food sector.

Originality/value

Innovative supply chain management helps SMEs to see beyond the silo mentality and helps them to focus on greater value addition in the supply chain.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Denise Worsfold and Christopher J. Griffith

Describes a survey of food safety training for staff in the retail, care and catering industry. Training provisions were evaluated against the guidance in the relevant…

Abstract

Describes a survey of food safety training for staff in the retail, care and catering industry. Training provisions were evaluated against the guidance in the relevant industry guides. Additional information was collected on the managers’ perceptions of and attitudes towards hygiene training. The extent and level of training of the retail butchers, who had to comply with the licensing regulations, was better than care homes and caterers of an equivalent size. Some of the care homes were not compliant with the training requirements of the Food Safety (General Food Hygiene) Regulations. There was a similar lack of hygiene management systems in most of the catering businesses in this study but senior staff were better trained and were able to provide in‐house training to greater effect. All the businesses carried out on‐the‐job training, although in some this was restricted to induction training, the content of which was often ill defined. There was a lack of documented hygiene procedures, reinforcement strategies and very little refresher training activity. Many managers failed to provide feedback on performance, to test hygiene knowledge or praise good hygienic performance. Half of the managers were not trained to train, and often were untrained in elementary hygiene themselves. Some managers recognised that conditions in the workplace and time pressures could contribute to poor hygiene performances.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Andreas Souliotis, Katerina Giazitzi and George Boskou

The purpose of this paper is to develop and implement methods to benchmark the food safety and hygiene of different companies, regardless the management systems applied.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and implement methods to benchmark the food safety and hygiene of different companies, regardless the management systems applied.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected using a balanced questionnaire which was based on the fishbone model of Ishikawa. The questionnaire includes general questions about the company and 25 questions about personnel, machinery, materials, methods and environment. It was applied to 202 food industries, 42 food retail businesses and 49 food service companies. The data were collected from interviews of industry people related to food safety and from audits of business facilities. The benchmarking methods were descriptive statistics, radar charts, cluster analysis and association rules.

Findings

The radar charts were used to benchmark food companies on safety and hygiene. Food companies can be evaluated with this benchmarking tool with a balanced score of maximum 100 points.

Originality/value

This benchmarking tool could be useful for food control authorities, clusters of companies and certification bodies.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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