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Article

Jane Lu Hsu, Charlene W. Shiue and Kelsey J.-R. Hung

The purpose of this paper is to reveal influential information used in vegetable purchasing decisions of household primary food shoppers in China and in Taiwan.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reveal influential information used in vegetable purchasing decisions of household primary food shoppers in China and in Taiwan.

Design/methodology/approach

Two in-person surveys were administrated separately in Shanghai, China and in Taipei, Taiwan, the two most populous metropolitan areas in China and in Taiwan, respectively.

Findings

Results reveal that about 32 per cent of respondents in Taipei purchase vegetables once in every two to three days. The majority of respondents in Shanghai (81 per cent) purchase vegetables on a daily basis. Results of factor analysis reveal the four dimensions, origin labelling, promotion, selection, and quality, influence purchasing decisions of respondents in Taipei and in Shanghai. For household primary food shoppers in Taipei, origin labelling and selection help food shoppers in Taipei in vegetable purchasing decisions, but not promotion. For those food shoppers in Shanghai who purchase large volume of vegetables, quality is the most important factor in purchasing decisions.

Originality/value

This study provides new insights into vegetable purchasing decisions in two populous cities in China and Taiwan. The contributions of this study are to provide valuable information in vegetable purchasing decisions for effective information communication in retailing; and to fill in the gap of research in vegetable purchasing decisions in consumer behaviour studies in Chinese societies.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Xiaoxiao Fu, Bingna Lin and Yao-Chin Wang

Grounded in the theory of mental budgeting, this paper aims to investigate how the regret and perfectionism of exposition attendees influences their purchasing strategy.

Abstract

Purpose

Grounded in the theory of mental budgeting, this paper aims to investigate how the regret and perfectionism of exposition attendees influences their purchasing strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

This research collected on-site data at a well-established specialty food exposition in China. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling were applied to test the proposed model.

Findings

The findings confirm the effect of psychological mechanism (regret and perfectionism) on exposition attendees’ purchasing strategy as one that boosts/impairs their confidence in purchasing healthy food at the exposition. Specifically, regret and perfectionism show differential contributions to purchasing strategy dimensions. Variety seeking has a positive effect, whereas price consciousness has a negative effect, on purchase confidence.

Practical implications

Event organizers and exhibitors should understand attendees’ consumption-related psychological mechanism and devise effective management and marketing strategies for optimal consumption experiences at expositions. They can create an informative and worry-free experience that facilitates a pleasant thought process to reduce uncertainty in attendees’ on-site decision-making.

Originality/value

The current research pioneered a unique model conceptualizing the important, yet underexplored, phenomenon of purchasing mechanism in the exposition setting. Addressing the emerging interest in food expositions, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first for examining purchasing mechanism from the perspective of mental budgeting, providing insightful knowledge about how the psychological mechanism affects exposition attendees’ pre-purchase evaluation and confidence toward purchasing healthy food at expositions.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article

Muslichah M. , Rose Abdullah and Lutfi Abdul Razak

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating effect of religiosity on the relationship between awareness and purchase decision of halal foods.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating effect of religiosity on the relationship between awareness and purchase decision of halal foods.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a convenience sampling procedure, 200 questionnaires were distributed to various local higher education institutions with a 64% response rate. A moderated regression analysis is used to test the relationship between awareness and purchase decision, with religiosity as the moderating variable.

Findings

As expected, the authors find that among the sample, the level of awareness toward halal foods is high, and that the effect of awareness on purchase decision is positive and significant. Importantly, they find that religiosity acts as a moderating variable on the relationship between awareness and purchase decision.

Research limitations/implications

First, the sample was taken from higher institutions only and respondents were selected using convenience sampling. Hence, it may not be fully representative of the Brunei Muslim population. Second, there may also be omitted variables not considered in the study. Third, the survey instrument and conceptualization of religiosity are both issues that may require further investigation in the literature.

Practical implications

The results indicate that awareness is an important antecedent of Muslim students’ intention to purchase halal foods. Marketers should design their campaigns focusing on creating awareness regarding their compliance with halal products. Moreover, food manufacturers and sellers should use the reliable halal certification and logo as a way to inform their consumers that their products are truly halal.

Originality/value

This study adds to the current limited knowledge of halal foods research. In particular, the authors investigate the moderating effect of religiosity on the relationship between awareness and purchase decision of halal foods.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article

Madeleine Pullman and Robin Wikoff

This purpose of this paper is to understand the environmental impacts of stakeholder-driven sustainable purchasing policies in institutional settings.

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper is to understand the environmental impacts of stakeholder-driven sustainable purchasing policies in institutional settings.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is framed using stakeholder and life cycle assessment (LCA) theories. The study uses a multi-method approach. Starting with interviews to understand the breadth of sustainability issues and significant food purchases facing institutional purchasing managers, the authors subsequently perform LCA of these various policies using the most popular food item in different categories.

Findings

From the interview results, the authors found that food purchasers focus predominately on cost, thus, are committed to food and packaging reduction. They are driven to buy local foods based on their consumer stakeholders but share their commitment to buying local products if the cost is appropriate. In the LCA of popular food items in multiple scenarios, avoiding food waste of various forms had significantly higher carbon emissions savings than packaging reduction or transportation minimizing (buy local) strategies.

Research limitations/implications

The sample relied solely on the perceptions of institutional purchasing managers in university dining services. Future research should involve collecting data from other stakeholder groups such as the customers themselves, institutional leaders, and in other types of institutional settings such as hospitals and government agencies.

Practical implications

The research provides managers with insights concerning the trade-offs between different sustainability objectives. In particular, findings show that reducing waste related animal protein has a bigger impact on environmental performance than many other popular sustainability objectives such as buying local or reducing packaging waste.

Social implications

The paper focuses on the purchasing trade-offs of buying local vs national food products, different packaging solutions, and food waste generation. These decisions offer some social benefits (improve the economic situation for local farms vs consolidated food producers) as well as multiple environmental benefits.

Originality/value

The paper presents new findings on the sustainability purchasing priorities of stakeholders in institutional food settings and subsequent LCA of those policies to show which might have the most environmental impact.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article

Luca Marinelli, Fabio Fiano, Gian Luca Gregori and Lucia Michela Daniele

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the food and beverage automatic retail environment by analysing the impact of planograms, conceived as a visual merchandising…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the food and beverage automatic retail environment by analysing the impact of planograms, conceived as a visual merchandising practice and shopping time – the time spent making a purchase – as part of food consumer purchasing behaviour to further enrich the debate on the ability of companies to absorb customer knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

A real-world experiment was conducted using a sample of 27,230 valid observations of consumer purchasing decision-making processes at automatic vending machines (AVMs). Data were collected by a shopper behaviour analytics system that allows for a better understanding of the AVM users' behaviour. Two sets of regressions were run to test the two hypotheses.

Findings

The experimental results demonstrated that planograms – the planned, systematic organisation of products in an AVM – positively impact food purchases. A planogram acts as a mediator in the relationship between shopping time and purchase, resulting in shorter shopping times and more purchases.

Originality/value

This work adds to the customer knowledge literature by focussing on customer behaviour in the food and beverage automated shopping environment. The shopper analytics technology adopted to collect real-time data leads to a better understanding of the purchasing behaviour of AVMs' users and provides new marketing and retail insights into AVMs' performance that retailers can use to improve their marketing strategies.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Kerstin Bergström, Cecilia Solér and Helena Shanahan

Food consumption impacts heavily on the environment. It is therefore highly relevant to study foodpurchasing processes and needs for environmental information in the food

Abstract

Purpose

Food consumption impacts heavily on the environment. It is therefore highly relevant to study foodpurchasing processes and needs for environmental information in the food supply chain. The objective of this article is to report findings from a study identifying practices in using environmental information when making decisions on what food to procure and purchase.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a phenomenographic approach, professional purchasing managers at food production companies and wholesalers in public and commercial food services as well as retailing were interviewed with the aim of identifying practices when using environmental information in decisions on what food to procure for purchasing.

Findings

The findings show that purchasers are dependent on corporate policy when it comes to environmental considerations related to food. Purchasers are mainly guided by business parameters with respect to price, quality and service. These factors are given priority over co‐operation along the food supply chain. Such co‐operation has been shown to have the potential to encourage environmentally friendly purchasing decisions.

Originality/value

The study places the issue of the use of and need for environmental information in the food supply chain on the national agenda in Sweden. Thus, the study contributes to increasing the awareness of the importance of professional food purchasers as actors for change towards more environmentally friendly food consumption.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 107 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Mahsa-Sadat Taghavi and Alireza Seyedsalehi

The purpose of this paper is to study the impact of chocolate packaging and brand on the purchasing decisions of a number of Iranian children and their parents. The paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the impact of chocolate packaging and brand on the purchasing decisions of a number of Iranian children and their parents. The paper also aims to investigate the role of pester power as a moderating variable in the relationship between children’s purchasing decision and that of their parents.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a 26-item Likert-scaled questionnaire administered in February 2013 to the parents of 600 children at two daycare centers and four elementary schools in the city of Qazvin in Iran. The returned and complete questionnaires were subjected to confirmatory factor analysis and path analysis within structural equation modeling using IBM® Amos and SPSS statistical packages.

Findings

The results show that packaging and brand have a positive effect on parents. However, children were only influenced by packaging, and not brand. Further, it was found that children influenced their parents during store visits. The study also confirms the moderating role of children’s pester power in the relationship between children’s purchasing decision and that of their parents.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of the study is that the issue of the effect of packaging and brand on children was explored through the opinions of parents. Also, due to budget constraints, images of chocolate products rather than real packages were used. Future research might study the effect of other factors such as peers, socio-cultural issues, and economic status. Another possibility would be to include other variables such as mental involvement and time constraint.

Practical implications

The findings of the study might be useful for all manufacturers and suppliers of goods. More specifically, managers and marketing agents in the chocolate industry are recommended to improve children’s brand awareness through advertising as a way of making them want to buy branded products.

Originality/value

The most important difference between this work and previous studies is its use of children’s pester power as a moderating factor in the relationship between the purchasing decision of children and that of their parents. Another good thing about this paper is that it gives the reader an insight into the Iranian context. The results give the manufacturers a better understanding of the factors children take into account when deciding to purchase something.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Christian Tirelli and María Pilar Martínez-Ruiz

To address a research gap regarding the role of food during academic sojourns by international students, the aim of this paper is to analyze the influence of food

Abstract

Purpose

To address a research gap regarding the role of food during academic sojourns by international students, the aim of this paper is to analyze the influence of food attributes on food purchase decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

An extensive literature review suggested hypotheses pertaining to the influence of food attributes on the different stages of the buying decision process of academic sojourners. With data from 139 international university students enrolled in a Spanish university, factorial principal component analyses and linear parametric regressions were conducted.

Findings

Three factors underlie food attributes and influence all stages of the food purchase decision process: sustainable production, appearance and accessibility, and then flavor. The greatest influence occurs in the choice stage.

Research limitations/implications

The sojourners exhibit a strong tendency to purchase products that reflect sustainable practices.

Practical implications

Useful information about the influence of food attributes on purchasing decisions can support more effective decisions in food distribution channels, including coherent image strategies, enhanced new product development, and better communications to target the growing market of sojourners.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the minimal empirical research pertaining to the role of food for international university students, and describes the influence of food attributes on purchase decisions.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Jason J. Turner, James Kelly and Kirsty McKenna

Aims to investigate the influence parents perceive their children have on family foodpurchasing decisions and discuss the reasons why parents do not always purchase

Abstract

Purpose

Aims to investigate the influence parents perceive their children have on family foodpurchasing decisions and discuss the reasons why parents do not always purchase healthy food products.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative analysis was conducted, using 301 questionnaires which were distributed to parents through a local primary school in Dundee. From this sample 143 were returned.

Findings

Most parents acknowledge that their children do influence their purchasing decisions, with 86 (60 percent) agreeing or strongly agreeing that they gave in to their children's demands; however, parents feel that they do not give in to pester power. Parents were aware of health issues and state that they regularly purchase healthy food products for their children. However, many parents admit to buying unhealthy food products for their children as treats.

Research limitations/implications

This was an exploratory study and carries the limitation of generalisability as it was conducted solely in Dundee. Any further research should contrast perspectives from other UK cities and develop research into the family dynamics and parents' rationale for “yielding” to their children with regard to junk food.

Practical implications

It is suggested that parents “give in” to their children, which demonstrates the importance of “getting” the message across to children to eat more healthily. Further, the paper provides insight into influencing factors, suggesting that advertising can play a prominent role in influencing children's eating habits.

Originality/value

This paper is helpful to both academics and practitioners in the field of healthy eating among children. The paper provides some insight into parental perspectives of healthy eating and their responses to pester power.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 108 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Nazlida Muhamad, Vai Shiem Leong and Normalisa Md Isa

This paper aims to model consumers’ decision to use halal logo on packaged food products. The model primarily tests the importance of country of origin (COO) of a halal…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to model consumers’ decision to use halal logo on packaged food products. The model primarily tests the importance of country of origin (COO) of a halal logo as an indicator for assessing credibility of a halal logo, and its relevance in consumers’ decision to use the logo in packaged food purchase.

Design/methodology/approach

A data set from a survey of 559 respondents from two countries was used to test eight hypotheses that were developed based on a modified theory of planned behaviour framework, using partial least squares procedures.

Findings

Halal certification logo was found to have COO effect on consumers’ evaluation during purchase decision of food items. Consumer uses information on the COO of a halal logo to assess the logo’s credibility in delivering the halal food standard. The construct, along with the constructs of religiosity and its interaction terms, subjective norms and attitude, explains consumers’ intention to consider the halal logo during packaged food purchase.

Research limitations/implications

Generalization of the findings is limited to the packaged food industry and to the consumer groups surveyed in the two countries.

Practical implications

There is a need for marketers to recognize Muslim consumers’ sensitivity towards the origin of a halal logo in choosing the right logo for their products. Logo certifiers may want to consider adopting marketing strategies to market their certification as a credible marker of a halal food standard.

Originality/value

The effect of COO of halal logo and its influence on consumers’ decision to use the logo in purchase decision are new to the literature.

Details

Review of International Business and Strategy, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-6014

Keywords

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