Search results

1 – 10 of over 14000
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Elizabeth C. Redmond, Christopher J. Griffith, Jenny Slader and Tom J. Humphrey

The use of an observational approach in conjunction with isolation techniques for campylobacter and salmonella detection has facilitated a detailed evaluation of the risk…

3267

Abstract

The use of an observational approach in conjunction with isolation techniques for campylobacter and salmonella detection has facilitated a detailed evaluation of the risk of cross contamination during food preparation. Identification of suspected exposure routes has linked naturally contaminated raw foods with important food‐handling malpractices, contaminated contact surfaces and ready‐to‐eat foods. In a model domestic kitchen, 29 per cent of food preparation sessions resulted in positive campylobacter isolations from prepared salads, cleaning materials and food‐contact surfaces. Typing results showed that specific campylobacter strains isolated from prepared chicken salads were the same as the strains isolated from the raw chicken pieces, indicating microbial transfer during food preparation. Data obtained from this study can be used for exposure assessment, risk management and in the development of consumer risk communication strategies.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 106 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2007

Margaret E. Beck

The purpose of this paper is to examine the family dinner in Los Angeles County, California, focusing on the role of commercial foods and the time invested in food

3250

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the family dinner in Los Angeles County, California, focusing on the role of commercial foods and the time invested in food preparation. Popular media emphasize the increasing use of processed commercial foods in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 64 dinner preparation and consumption events were videotaped and observed (32 families, two weeknights each). Observations determined the source of food served (restaurant, take‐out, or home‐cooked), the ingredients and dishes in each meal prepared at home, and the time required to prepare it.

Findings

The findings in this paper showed that, even when prepared at home, most evening meals included processed commercial foods in at least moderate amounts. Home‐cooked meals required an average of 34 minutes' “hands‐on time” and 52 minutes' “total time” to prepare. Heavy use of commercial foods saved, on average, ten to 12 minutes, hands‐on time but did not reduce total preparation time. Commercial foods require more limited cooking skills and permit more complex dishes or meals to be prepared within a given time‐frame than do raw ingredients. They may also reduce time investment at stages other than meal preparation, such as shopping.

Originality/value

This paper provides a rare glimpse of food preparation and meal consumption behavior on the family level. Most reports on US food habits are based on survey and purchasing data, rather than direct observation of household activities as used here.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 109 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Stephanie M. Bostic, Carole A. Bisogni and Jeffery Sobal

The purpose of this paper is to examine food preparation practices of US older adults by assessing their conceptualization of food preparation methods and their routine…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine food preparation practices of US older adults by assessing their conceptualization of food preparation methods and their routine use of food preparation methods and kitchen equipment.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 17 community-dwelling older adults used cards with names of food preparation methods and cooking equipment items to do one open sort and three closed sorts about: food preparation method classifications; food preparation method use frequency; kitchen equipment use frequency; and essential vs non-essential kitchen equipment. Descriptive statistics, cluster analysis, and qualitative thematic analysis were performed.

Findings

Participants classified food preparation methods using multiple dimensions: ways to alter food, inputs, location, timing, and personal behavior. They used a wide range of food preparation methods and kitchen equipment items in routine cooking. The mean number of the 38 preparation methods sorted as used “often” was 16.5±5.0. In total, 15 of the 17 participants reported using more than 20 of the 40 equipment items “often.” The mean number of equipment items identified as “essential” was 21.5±9.3.

Practical implications

Food professionals should consider access to equipment and food preparation skills and preferences when designing products and working with consumers. Addressing gaps in human and material capital may support adoption of food preparation practices.

Originality/value

Food preparation method and equipment use frequency has rarely been examined from the household cook’s perspective. Using card sorts is a novel approach to examining consumer classification of an extensive list of preparation methods and kitchen equipment.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Radhika Bongoni, Ruud Verkerk, Matthijs Dekker and Bea Steenbekkers

Domestic preparation practices influence the sensory properties and nutritional composition of food products. Information on the variability in actual domestic preparation

Abstract

Purpose

Domestic preparation practices influence the sensory properties and nutritional composition of food products. Information on the variability in actual domestic preparation practices is needed to assess the influence of applied conditions on the sensory and nutritional quality of food. The collection of such information requires a reliable, valid and practical research method. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Direct in-home observations, observations in a model-kitchen using cameras, and a self-reporting questionnaire were evaluated for reliability and validity, to study domestic food preparation practices by consumers. Broccoli preparation practices by Dutch consumers were checked by these three methods in this research paper.

Findings

All three research methods were found to be test-retest, inter-observer, parallel-form reliable; and face, content and concurrent valid. However, the self-reporting questionnaire is the most practical research method that can be administered on a large number of respondents in a short time to capture the wide variations in preparation practices.

Originality/value

Consumers can be assisted on domestic food preparation practices that reach their sensory preferences (e.g. texture, colour) as well as have health benefits on consumption.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 December 2019

Maki Nonomura

The purpose of this paper is to explore reasons for household preparation losses.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore reasons for household preparation losses.

Design/methodology/approach

Observations of preparation behaviors and semi-structured interviews of nine people were conducted in their kitchens. The data were analyzed through a qualitative data analysis method.

Findings

Three types of preparation losses were identified, i.e. possibly avoidable food waste, excessive removals and unintentional losses. Possibly avoidable food waste and excessive removals were generated owing to people’s perception that is in the gray area between edible and inedible, their preferences, lower quality of food, convenience in preparation, lack of preparation skill and knowledge, and lack of concern about preparation losses. Unintentional losses were tiny pieces of food that were left on cooking tools.

Research limitations/implications

As this study’s participants were nine women living in Japan, further research is needed in order to achieve saturation.

Originality/value

Few studies have discussed reasons for preparation losses, and extant studies were based on a diary method and questionnaires. This present study uncovers several new reasons for preparation losses based on interviews and observations of consumer preparation behaviors. These new details would be helpful for campaigns or programs that aim to reduce food losses.

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2011

J. Kennedy, A. Nolan, S. Gibney, S. O'Brien, M.A.S. McMahon, K. McKenzie, B. Healy, D. McDowell, S. Fanning and P.G. Wall

This paper aims to determine the potential for the spread of bacteria from raw meat and poultry during home food preparation to the surrounding kitchen environment, hands…

1937

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine the potential for the spread of bacteria from raw meat and poultry during home food preparation to the surrounding kitchen environment, hands and prepared food due to unsafe handling practices, which are predicted by consumers' knowledge, behaviour and attitudes.

Design/methodology/approach

The potential for transfer of E.coli and C. jejuni was monitored in a simulated domestic kitchen environment while food preparation was filmed (n=60 respondents). A survey was also administered.

Findings

The results of the study show that transfer of bacteria around the kitchen environment and onto prepared meals are predicted by a lack of thoroughly washing contaminated hands, knives and chopping boards both during and after meal preparation. A higher level of perceived importance of correct food handling behaviour is associated with higher levels of educational attainment and age and food risk perceptions are positively associated with age.

Practical implications

The results highlight the importance of promoting preventative measures and the means of employing them specifically to the young and less educated public who do not frequently cook and prepare food.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to include a verifiable audit of consumer food safety behaviour, microbiological sampling of surfaces, food and hands as well as a consumer survey of knowledge, behaviour and attitudes.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 113 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Richard A.E. North, Jim P. Duguid and Michael A. Sheard

Describes a study to measure the quality of service provided by food‐poisoning surveillance agencies in England and Wales in terms of the requirements of a representative…

2362

Abstract

Describes a study to measure the quality of service provided by food‐poisoning surveillance agencies in England and Wales in terms of the requirements of a representative consumer ‐ the egg producing industry ‐ adopting “egg associated” outbreak investigation reports as the reference output. Defines and makes use of four primary performance indicators: accessibility of information; completeness of evidence supplied in food‐poisoning outbreak investigation reports as to the sources of infection in “egg‐associated” outbreaks; timeliness of information published; and utility of information and advice aimed at preventing or controlling food poisoning. Finds that quality expectations in each parameter measured are not met. Examines reasons why surveillance agencies have not delivered the quality demanded. Makes use of detailed case studies to illustrate inadequacies of current practice. Attributes failure to deliver “accessibility” to a lack of recognition on the status or nature of “consumers”, combined with a self‐maintenance motivation of the part of the surveillance agencies. Finds that failures to deliver “completeness” and “utility” may result from the same defects which give rise to the lack of “accessibility” in that, failing to recognize the consumers of a public service for what they are, the agencies feel no need to provide them with the data they require. The research indicates that self‐maintenance by scientific epidemiologists may introduce biases which when combined with a politically inspired need to transfer responsibility for food‐poisoning outbreaks, skew the conduct of investigations and their conclusions. Contends that this is compounded by serious and multiple inadequacies in the conduct of investigations, arising at least in part from the lack of training and relative inexperience of investigators, the whole conditioned by interdisciplinary rivalry between the professional groups staffing the different agencies. Finds that in addition failures to exploit or develop epidemiological technologies has affected the ability of investigators to resolve the uncertainties identified. Makes recommendations directed at improving the performance of the surveillance agencies which, if adopted will substantially enhance food poisoning control efforts.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 98 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 October 2020

Sarah Lefebvre and Marissa Orlowski

The purpose of this paper is to assess the effect of involvement in food preparation on estimated calorie content, perception of portion size and desirability of the food item.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the effect of involvement in food preparation on estimated calorie content, perception of portion size and desirability of the food item.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the hypotheses, three between-subjects experiments (one online, two in a laboratory setting) were conducted. Across the three experiments, participants were presented with a food item either ready for consumption (low involvement) or with the individual ingredients in need of assembly prior to consumption (high involvement).

Findings

Results showed that when a consumer is involved in the preparation of their food, they perceive the food to be lower in calories and smaller in portion size than when the same food is presented fully prepared and ready-to-eat. In addition, the effect of food preparation involvement on perception of portion size has negative downstream consequences on food desirability, as a smaller perceived portion resulted in a less desirable food item.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, the results of this research are the first to focus on the impact of preparation involvement on perceptions of the specific product attributes of calorie content and portion size, and the downstream effect on desirability.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

Gary Davies

Time is a multidimensional entity and research into how we allocate our time is still at an early stage of development. Food shopping and meal preparation are two related…

2067

Abstract

Time is a multidimensional entity and research into how we allocate our time is still at an early stage of development. Food shopping and meal preparation are two related activities which involve a significant consumption of time. Reports on research into attitudes to time and investigates three different aspects of people’s attitudes towards food shopping and preparation: an enjoyment of cooking; and a traditional orientation and a modern (role‐sharing) attitude to the linked activities. Identifies two clearly defined groups. No differences between the groups existed on demographic factors such as age, gender, whether the respondent had paid work and housing type. No differences existed in their ownership of time‐saving consumer durables. One group clearly saw mealtimes as significant activities and found cooking enjoyable. It did not matter whether the people in this group were time‐pressured or not ‐ they chose to allocate time to these activities and they differed in their attitudes to time. A substantial group in society still do see food shopping and meal preparation as important activities. Contends that while such individuals may be subject to modern‐day pressures they still appear to organize their time to maintain a traditional perspective. Considers the implications for food retailers and other marketers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 99 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

Jean Kennedy, Sarah Gibney, Aisling Nolan, Stephen O'Brien, M. Ann S. McMahon, David McDowell, Seamus Fanning and Patrick G. Wall

The International Scientific Forum on Home Hygiene's (IFH) approach to infectious disease prevention is “targeted hygiene”, which means identifying the routes of…

1282

Abstract

Purpose

The International Scientific Forum on Home Hygiene's (IFH) approach to infectious disease prevention is “targeted hygiene”, which means identifying the routes of transmission of infection in the home and community, and targeting hygiene measures at “critical points” (CPs) to break the chain of transmission. This paper aims to identify and prioritise CPs in the home kitchen environment during food preparation in order to inform food safety campaigns.

Design/methodology/approach

This study involved: filming participants (n=60) while they prepared a meal according to a specified recipe (30 beef/salad burgers and 30 chicken salads); swabbing key potential contamination sites in the participant's kitchen for microbiological testing; sampling the meat and salad components of the cooked meal for microbiological testing; visual inspection and temperature check of the meat after cooking; and administering a survey of knowledge, attitudes and demographic factors.

Findings

This study has identified the critical points (CPs) during domestic food preparation as: CP1: correct cooking practices; CP2: prevention of cross‐contamination; and CP3: correct food storage practices. Statistically significant links were found between food safety knowledge and behaviour as well as between food safety attitudes and demographic factors.

Originality/value

This is the first study to link all aspects of observed consumer food safety practices in the home to food safety knowledge, attitudes, perceptions, psychosocial and demographic factors to identify these CPs.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 113 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 14000