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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2019

Hong-Jing Cui, Kim-Shyan Fam and Tai-Yang Zhao

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of regulatory focus on Chinese consumers’ intention to consume ethnic food, the mediating role of food neophobia and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of regulatory focus on Chinese consumers’ intention to consume ethnic food, the mediating role of food neophobia and the moderating role of message framing with regard to regulatory focus and ethnic food consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

Lab experiments method was used in this paper, two studies were designed to test the relationship between regulatory focus, food neophobia, message framing and intention to eat ethnic food. Study 1 was to test the influence of regulatory focus on intention to eat ethnic food, and the mediation role of food neophobia. Study 2 was to test the moderation role of message framing.

Findings

Results indicated that consumers with promotion focus have higher intention to eat ethnic food than consumers with prevention focus. Prevention-focus consumers have higher food neophobia, which leads to lower intention to eat ethnic food. Food neophobia plays the mediating role in the relationship between regulatory focus and intention to eat ethnic food. Regulatory fit can increase consumers’ intention to eat ethnic food. Promotion-focus consumers show higher eating intention in gain-framing situation, while prevention-focus consumers show higher eating intention in loss-framing situation.

Research limitations/implications

The study was undertaken in China. Further studies should include respondents living in countries other than China.

Practical implications

This research provides a venue for marketers of destination tourism, especially for ethnic food marketers to introduce and advertise ethnic foods to tourists. Regulatory fit is important for destination tourism. To improve consumers’ eating intention, this research suggests that ethnic food marketers should pay attention to regulatory focus of consumers from different regions and cultural background, and design corresponding message framing for consumers with different regulatory focus to form regulatory fit.

Originality/value

First, this study has proposed and tested regulatory focus’ effect on intention to consumer ethnic food. Food neophobia is used to explain the mechanism of relation between regulatory focus and intention to eat ethnic food. Also, message framing is introduced to define the boundary of relation between regulatory focus and intention to eat ethnic food.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2021

Li-Chun Hsu

This study aims to investigate the effects of visitors’ dietary habits on their acceptance of local food from the perspective of positive (e.g. local food involvement) and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the effects of visitors’ dietary habits on their acceptance of local food from the perspective of positive (e.g. local food involvement) and negative (e.g. food neophobia) food-related personality traits.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted on visitors to the Slow Food Festival in Taitung, Taiwan. A total of 327 valid questionnaire responses were collected and structural equation modeling was used to conduct path analyzes.

Findings

The analysis results supported all hypotheses. Food neophobia plays a key factor in moderating roles.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by integrating positive and negative perspectives of food-related personality traits. In addition, this study proposes that food neophobia plays a moderating role in food choice and behavioral decisions.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2018

Meltem Caber, Gökhan Yilmaz, Dogus Kiliçarslan and Adnan Öztürk

The purpose of this study is to examine how food neophobia, food involvement, tour guide performance and intention of local food consumption impact each other.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine how food neophobia, food involvement, tour guide performance and intention of local food consumption impact each other.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was performed with a sample of international tourists visiting Antalya, Turkey, and the data were used to test the proposed research model by means of structural equation modelling.

Findings

Results reflected a causal relationship among the examined constructs. Although tour guide performance had an insignificant effect on food neophobia, tourists’ food involvement negatively impacted and decreased neophobia.

Originality/value

This study is an exceptional contribution to the literature, as it empirically investigates the role of tour guides on tourists’ local food consumption behaviour.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Hiram Ting, Ernest Cyril de Run, Jun-Hwa Cheah and Francis Chuah

The purpose of this paper is to serve as groundwork to investigate the determinants of ethnic food consumption intention in the context of developing markets. Using the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to serve as groundwork to investigate the determinants of ethnic food consumption intention in the context of developing markets. Using the theory of planned behaviour as the underlying basis, it is aimed to explain the effect of attitude, subjective norm and perceived behaviour control on consumption intention towards Dayak food. Since Dayak food is relatively unfamiliar compared to conventional food in Malaysia, food neophobia is incorporated into the model so as to assess its moderation effect on every postulated relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative approach via self-administered questionnaire was adopted. In all, 300 copies of the questionnaire were distributed to non-Dayak Malaysians, and 211 usable copies were subsequently collected, suggesting that non-response bias was not a major issue. A post hoc Harman single-factor analysis was also performed to ensure the variance in the data was not explained by one single factor, thus addressing the common method bias. Structural equation modelling using partial least squares approach was then utilized to assess the relationships of variables under investigation and the moderation effect of food neophobia.

Findings

After ensuring the data have acceptable reliability and validity, structural model assessment was performed to test the hypotheses. The findings show that attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioural control all have positive effect on consumption intention of non-Dayak Malaysians towards Dayak food. However, food neophobia is only found to have a moderation effect on the relationship between subjective norm and consumption intention.

Research limitations/implications

First, the sample is largely consisted of college and university students in Malaysia who are believed to be more daring to try new things, including new food. Second and more importantly, the dearth of literature and empirical studies on Dayak food and ethnic food in Malaysia might have actually pointed to the limitation in using only quantitative questionnaire in the study. As salient beliefs are the antecedents in the theory of planned behaviour, knowing consumers’ specific beliefs about Dayak food would have provided a more detailed and comprehensive understanding of consumption intention and the moderating effect of food neophobia.

Practical implications

The moderation effect of food neophobia on the relationship between subjective norm and consumption intention towards Dayak food implies the importance of recommendations and favourable word-of-mouth from the significant ones, such as family members and peers, to make people willing to try and consume it. This corresponds to earlier findings pertaining to the collectivistic culture in Malaysia. Unlike countries with individualistic cultures, Malaysians tend to conform to the consumption choices of significant others. This implies that those whom they hold in high regard, are able to influence them both positively and negatively through their advice or opinions.

Originality/value

The present study has not only extended the use of theory of planned behaviour in the context of Dayak food consumption intention in a developing country, but it has also deepened the theory by incorporating food neophobia as the moderator to provide additional theoretical explanation to ethnic food consumption intention. Given the wealth of Asian culture, and its significant role in the global marketplace, the understanding of ethnic food consumption intention of the local and foreign consumers using the extended theory of planned behaviour would contribute knowledge not only to consumer behaviour, but also to food and service industry and tourism.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Wim Verbeke and Gisela Poquiviqui López

Awareness and testing of ethnic cuisine have increased in the past decades as a consequence of the growing international trade, migration, tourism and globalisation. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Awareness and testing of ethnic cuisine have increased in the past decades as a consequence of the growing international trade, migration, tourism and globalisation. This article aims to focus on the attitude and behaviour of Belgians towards Latin‐American ethnic foods, and of Hispanics living in Belgium towards mainstream Belgian food.

Design/methodology/approach

The role of socio‐demographic characteristics, food neophobia, and degree of acculturation or openness on food preference and choice among these two population groups is analysed. A survey with 119 Belgian and 127 Hispanic participants was performed. Data analysis deals with descriptive analyses and statistical validation of the perceived associations by means of chi‐square, t‐test, ANOVA, correlations, and stepwise multiple regression.

Findings

The overall opinion and degree of satisfaction of the Belgian sample towards ethnic food were favourable. Latin‐American food consumption and attitude of Belgians are negatively correlated with food neophobia, which is significantly higher among urban and 55+ aged consumers, and positively correlated with openness to new cultures. Taste and appearance were key attributes that determined Belgians' preference for ethnic foods. Hispanics' general perception towards Belgian mainstream food was favourable as well, although they considered their own food as being better in taste. Barriers to maintain Latin‐American food habits are availability and time constraints. Hispanics' adoption of traditional Belgian cuisine is positively correlated with time of residence in Belgium and negatively correlated with maintenance of native social interaction and language use. Food neophobia does not emerge as a determinant of Hispanics' dietary acculturation to mainstream Belgian food.

Research limitations/implications

Data are collected from a relatively small convenience sample, which limits generalisation of the findings beyond the sample characteristics, which renders the findings exploratory rather than conclusive.

Originality/value

This paper covers important, not well‐explored and previously neglected research subjects, namely attitude, perceptions and behaviour towards ethnic food and food consumption among ethnic minorities in the increasingly globalised food market. The main contribution pertains to simultaneously investigating the role of socio‐demographic, acculturation and food neophobia on food consumption decisions.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 107 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2020

Gislayne da Silva Goulart, Mayra Monteiro Viana and Thelma Lucchese-Cheung

The purpose of this paper is to assess consumers' perception of a typical Brazilian food in its familiar and innovative versions through a survey combined with textual analysis.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess consumers' perception of a typical Brazilian food in its familiar and innovative versions through a survey combined with textual analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

The study collected consumers’ data (N = 476) via survey and conducted two textual analysis – similitude and descending hierarchical classification (DHC) – using the Iramuteq software. In order to evaluate the consumers’ perception, traditional cheese breads (familiar) and cheese breads with carrots (innovative) were used. The consumers are from Central-West Brazil and had diverse socioeconomic status.

Findings

Similitude analysis showed that the familiar product presented mostly neutral or positive characteristics. The DHC analysis provided three relevant classes for the traditional cheese bread (familiar) product, considering the consumers’ perceptions and socioeconomic status. For the innovative product, the similitude analysis showed negative associations with the food (food neophobia), but there are also positive characteristics to be explored (food neophilia). Neophobia was attributed to hedonic aspects, e.g. doubts about the taste approval. Neophilia was related to normative aspects, e.g. the product's health benefits.

Research limitations/implications

The results are exploratory and, therefore, cannot be generalized, but can arise insights to different food products. It was observed that the chosen method can be useful to access the consumer's perception and could be replicated in other cultures and regarding different products.

Practical implications

Food neophobia can be avoided by highlighting hedonic aspects and food neophilia can be activate via normative attributes, so the launch of an innovative food should be accompanied by consumer-oriented marketing strategies.

Originality/value

The present study brings relevant insights regarding food neophobia and neophilia and uses a combination of survey with textual analysis.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Francesco La Barbera, Mario Amato and Giuliana Sannino

In recent years, the food industry has developed and brought to the market a number of “functional food” with healthy characteristics. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

In recent years, the food industry has developed and brought to the market a number of “functional food” with healthy characteristics. The purpose of this paper is to study and compare the effects of knowledge and food technology neophobia on individuals’ willingness to pay (WTP) for functionalized healthy food.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to explore these effects in hypothetical vs real settings, an experiment defined by a within-subject design with two treatments (functionalized vs conventional food) on two auction payment conditions (hypothetical vs real) has been conducted. The products chosen for the experiment were two different types of crushed tomatoes: conventional crushed tomatoes (control product) and a crushed tomatoes enriched with lycopene (functionalized product).

Findings

Results showed that participants stated, on average, a higher WTP for tomatoes enriched with lycopene than for conventional. This positive premium price was not affected by socio-demographic variables, political orientation and tomato-related preferences. As expected, the level of knowledge about lycopene exerted a significant positive effect on premium price in both auctions condition. Also the Healthy choice subscale of the Food Technology Neophobia Scale (FTNS) was a significant predictor of premium price, but only when the auction was hypothetical.

Originality/value

This paper might shed some light upon the predictive power of the FTNS on individuals’ behavior in a real market setting.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2018

Saman Sheikhesmaeili and Sana Hazbavi

The purpose of this paper is to determine the impact of food-related lifestyle (FRL) and food-related personality traits (FRPTs) on customer satisfaction and loyalty so…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the impact of food-related lifestyle (FRL) and food-related personality traits (FRPTs) on customer satisfaction and loyalty so that sufficient evidence for forming a new pattern of predictors of customer satisfaction and loyalty can be explored.

Design/methodology/approach

The research method in this study was the descriptive type and was based on the goal of the applied research methods. Data were collected from 384 sample group consumers of chain stores in the city of Tehran. The hypothesized relationships were tested using structural equation modeling (SEM).

Findings

Final results of study showed the significant effects of FRL and FRPT on satisfaction and loyalty of consumers. This indicates that aforementioned variables can create customer satisfaction and loyalty toward food. The research conceptual model was confirmed with goodness of fit.

Research limitations/implications

First, the sample consisted of customers who use a wide range of food despite diverse motives and interests. While knowing that costumers’ specific traits about food would have provided a more detailed and comprehensive understanding, conducting research in a set of general food consumer without considering special foods category could be a limitation. Second, and more importantly, since the customer behavior in consumption choices is an unconscious and cognitive process, other factors and domain that are linked to customer satisfaction and loyalty would have been missed.

Practical implications

This study shows that understanding the behavioral aspects of food consumption can help food producing companies to adjust their production and specially to foresee changes. Marketers are advised to investigate customer traits to promote customer satisfaction and loyalty effectively. This paper contributes to the body of knowledge in food marketing.

Originality/value

The present study offers a unique and valuable insight into a customer’s behavior and deepens customer satisfaction and loyalty by incorporating FRL, food neophobia scale and food involvement scale as independent variables to contribute knowledge in the context of food marketing, and throws some light upon the predictive power of mentioned variables on customer behaviors.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2018

Rodrigo Romo-Muñoz, Francisca Romo-Muñoz, Jairo Stefano Dote-Pardo and Ricardo Troncoso-Sepúlveda

The study focused on the Chilean olive oil market. The purpose of this paper is to determine the incidence of psychographic variables in the purchasing frequency of this…

Abstract

Purpose

The study focused on the Chilean olive oil market. The purpose of this paper is to determine the incidence of psychographic variables in the purchasing frequency of this product in an emerging market.

Design/methodology/approach

A face-to-face survey was applied to a stratified sample in the Biobío Region (Chile). The food neophobia scale (FNS) and list of values (LOV) were used simultaneously to measure psychographic variables. A multinomial logit model was estimated to determine the relationship between olive oil purchasing frequency and psychographic variables.

Findings

Results suggest that psychographic variables can explain olive oil purchasing frequency in the Chilean market. For a new food product, neophilia and the values of external and hedonistic dimensions can explain the higher purchasing frequency of the product. Just as in other research studies, the combined use of psychographic and sociodemographic variables performed well in segmenting a new food market.

Research limitations/implications

Results should be interpreted for the purchasing behavior of a new food in the context of an emerging market. Future research should expand the geographic zone to apply the survey and incorporate other variables such as ethnocentrism or ethnic identity.

Originality/value

Most available research studies have investigated separately the incidence of both variables in food consumption in developed, cosmopolitan and intercultural markets. This is the first approach in jointly applying the psychographic variables FNS and LOV in an emerging market and using olive oil as a case study.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2019

Maria Angela Perito, Antonella Di Fonzo, Marcello Sansone and Carlo Russo

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the market potential of food obtained from olive by-products. The marketing of such by-products (e.g. olive leaves and pulp) is a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the market potential of food obtained from olive by-products. The marketing of such by-products (e.g. olive leaves and pulp) is a challenging opportunity for the sustainable development of the sector. Yet, consumer demand is still poorly understood. The paper contributes to filling the knowledge gap with an empirical survey of a sample of Italian consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors provide an assessment of consumers’ willingness to accept (WTA) food from olive by-products. The authors collected structured questionnaire from a sample of 289 Italian consumers. The authors asked to consumers their willingness to try a variety of food products containing olive by-products, as a proxy for their WTA the products. In order to investigate the drivers of the average WTA, the authors used the information in the questionnaire to build four constructs of interest: technophobia, neophobia, perception of benefits and awareness about sustainable consumption. The choice of the constructs and the variables was driven by the existing literature.

Findings

The paper shows how the WTA food with olive by-products is a general attitude of the consumer, rather than product-specific choice. The results suggest that consumers perceive the use of olive by-products as a new technology for preparing well-known food products. The authors did not find statistical evidence of the wariness of olive by-products as new food products. Technophobia is the most important factor hampering the marketing of olive by-products.

Originality/value

The paper is a first attempt of exploring the topic of WTA food with olive by-products.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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