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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Manoj Dora, Dirk Van Goubergen, Maneesh Kumar, Adrienn Molnar and Xavier Gellynck

Recent literature emphasizes the application of lean manufacturing practices to food processing industries in order to improve operational efficiency and productivity…

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5582

Abstract

Purpose

Recent literature emphasizes the application of lean manufacturing practices to food processing industries in order to improve operational efficiency and productivity. Only a very limited number of studies have focused on the implementation of lean manufacturing practices within small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) operating in the food sector. The majority of these studies used the case study method and concentrated on individual lean manufacturing techniques geared towards resolving efficiency issues. This paper aims to analyze the status of the lean manufacturing practices and their benefits and barriers among European food processing SMEs.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire was developed to collect data. A total of 35 SMEs' representatives, mostly CEOs and operations managers, participated in the survey. The study investigated the role of two control variables in lean implementation: size of the company and country of origin.

Findings

The findings show that lean manufacturing practice deployment in food processing SMEs is generally low and still evolving. However, some lean manufacturing practices are more prevalent than others; e.g. flow, pull and statistical process control are not widely used by the food processing SMEs, whereas total productive maintenance, employee involvement, and customer association are more widespread. The key barriers encountered by food SMEs in the implementation of lean manufacturing practices result from the special characteristics of the food sector, such as highly perishable products, complicated processing, extremely variable raw materials, recipes and unpredictable demand. In addition, lack of knowledge and resources makes it difficult for food processing SMEs to embark on the lean journey.

Originality/value

The gap in the literature regarding the application of lean manufacturing in the food sector is identified and addressed in this study. The originality of this paper lies in analyzing the current status of the use of lean manufacturing practices among food SMEs in Europe and identifying potential barriers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Kishor Sharma

Most studies of intra‐industry trade (IIT) in manufacturing exclude the processed food sub‐sector (standard international trade classification (SITC) subgroups 0‐1) from…

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970

Abstract

Most studies of intra‐industry trade (IIT) in manufacturing exclude the processed food sub‐sector (standard international trade classification (SITC) subgroups 0‐1) from their analysis on the grounds that trade in this category is predominantly determined by the availability of natural resources in the country in question. However, this can produce misleading results, because the processed food industry is also subject to scale economies and product differentiation that determine IIT. Econometric investigations support most theoretical hypotheses, especially when the model of IIT is tested using the broad manufacturing data that include both the manufacturing commodity (SITC subgroups 5‐8) and processed food (SITC subgroups 0‐1). Results suggest that product differentiation and scale economies contribute positively to IIT, while trade protection discourages IIT.

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Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Book part
Publication date: 3 June 2021

Sankar Das and Bappaditya Biswas

Global recession is a serious issue to both the developed and developing economies. Reports published by the Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation (2019–20…

Abstract

Global recession is a serious issue to both the developed and developing economies. Reports published by the Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation (2019–20) have revealed that the growth of gross domestic products (GDPs) has shrunk significantly in the last few quarters. Due to such recession productions by many, manufacturing industries have reduced significantly, and a large number of people have lost their work, and scope of new job creations has also decreased. Food sector has also been affected by global recession (Agbedeyi & Adigwe, 2018). Food Processing Industry (FPI) is India's one of the most sunshine manufacturing industries and ranks fifth among the Indian industries in terms of production, consumption, and exports. The country ranks second in global ranking in terms of producing food products next to China. Despite the global recession, the FPIs helped the Indian economy to maintain the growth of the GDP and have created new job opportunities. Around 70 lakh persons are employed in both registered and unregistered food processing units in India. The value of food exported in the year 2018–19 was US $35.30 billion which was 10.69% of India's total export (i.e. US$330.67 billion) (MoFPI report, 2018–19). In this backdrop, the present chapter will try to find out the role of FPI in the Indian economy and will also highlight the prospects of this industry in the coming years.

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Productivity Growth in the Manufacturing Sector
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-094-8

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Rao Sanaullah Khan, John Vincent Grigor, Alan G. Win and Mike Boland

The purpose of this paper is to sketch a comparative account of NPD approaches between registered New Zealand food companies that are doing some sort of functional foods

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1374

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to sketch a comparative account of NPD approaches between registered New Zealand food companies that are doing some sort of functional foods (FF) development (Group 1) and those that are not (Group 2); to generate a better understanding of differences and commonalities in their NPD approaches from resource-based view of competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper opted an exploratory approach using a quantitative survey across food manufacturing companies in New Zealand. The primary foci of this empirical investigation were: orientation towards the NPD, innovation processes, collaborative NPD links and routes to commercialisation.

Findings

The results (based on a 22 per cent response rate) show a significant difference (p<0.05) in the aims and mode of NPD between Groups 1 and 2. Further it was observed that food companies in Group 1 have significantly (p<0.05) more diverse external collaborations with broader aims to collaborate, in comparison with food companies in Group 2.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted in New Zealand and thus generalisability of the findings may have to be interpreted carefully.

Practical implications

The traditional NPD approach (independent and closed NPD), with loose intellectual property protection practices, dominates the food manufacturing industry in New Zealand. Research-oriented collaborations need to be strengthened in their scope and content to develop the innovative capabilities and capacities of small and medium enterprises (SME's) within future value-added food productions.

Originality/value

This research provides the comparative narration of innovation process of food manufacturing companies with reference to FFs development.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Janek Ratnatunga

Reports the findings of a study conducted to explain the recentpoor performances of the Australian foodprocessing industry, byhistorically analysing the structural…

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2308

Abstract

Reports the findings of a study conducted to explain the recent poor performances of the Australian foodprocessing industry, by historically analysing the structural determinants and intensity of competition that prevailed in the early 1980s. Covers the period 1979 to 1985 in depth using a research design that incorporates information from both published sources and empirical interviews of senior marketing executives. Using the Porter framework, an accepted approach to the structural analysis of industries, demonstrates that the food industry was one of the most competitive industries in the world in the early 1980s. Attempts to analyse the resultant implications of such competitive pressures on industry performance in the 1990s.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 97 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Sergio Schneider and Marcio Gazolla

In this chapter we examine how the small scale agro-industries located in Southern Brazil, specifically in the North of the State of Rio Grande do Sul, started to deal…

Abstract

In this chapter we examine how the small scale agro-industries located in Southern Brazil, specifically in the North of the State of Rio Grande do Sul, started to deal with changes in their production processes, how they created and adapted technologies, and devised new products. Among the main outcomes of the study we highlight the novelties observed during the field research, especially regarding the family situation and the agro-manufacturing activities, in which we observed (i) a relative raise in autonomy; (ii) improvement in both the income level and the quality of life of household members; (iii) creation of new nested markets and marketing channels; (iv) development of more environmentally sustainable products; (v) improvement of the value added to food products; and (vi) development of new interfaces between families and other social actors.

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Constructing a New Framework for Rural Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-622-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Nigel P. Grigg

Statistical process control (SPC) is a common feature of quality control in most high volume manufacturing processes. In the food industry, while there is no explicit…

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1915

Abstract

Statistical process control (SPC) is a common feature of quality control in most high volume manufacturing processes. In the food industry, while there is no explicit compulsion for organisations to make use of SPC techniques, their usage can accrue the same benefits as in other industry sectors. Discusses the potential for application of SPC within the industry, and presents the results of a nationwide survey of 200 food processing companies, indicating relatively low levels of SPC usage. Three case studies are presented, which outline three typical approaches to SPC in the food sector, e.g. those organisations which make effective use of SPC in some form; those that do not perceive a need for it; and those that recognise its potential, but are unable to implement it effectively, owing to a lack of in‐house expertise or advisory literature. Suggests ways in which the use of SPC might be promoted and encouraged within the industry.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2020

Ida Giyanti, Anita Indrasari, Wahyudi Sutopo and Eko Liquiddanu

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the drivers of the depth of halal standard implementation in the halal-certified food manufacturing small- and medium-sized…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the drivers of the depth of halal standard implementation in the halal-certified food manufacturing small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The second aim of this paper is to empirically examine the effect of halal standard practices on the SME’s performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Of the 143 halal-certified SMEs in Solo Raya, Province of Central Java, Indonesia, 83 were willing to take part in the present research. The survey was carried out by an on-site visit to the targeted respondents. A structured questionnaire was used to gather primary data. Partial least square structural equation model was then used to analyze the collected data.

Findings

The results proved that internal motivation and organization commitment positively affect halal standard implementation, while external pressures do not. The external pressures influence the depth of halal standard implementation through internal motivation as a mediating variable. Furthermore, the depth of halal standard implementation leads to the improvement of operational performance. The improvement of operational performance can further encourage the increase of market performance and financial performance.

Research limitations/implications

The first limitation of this research is about the samples in which they are small-sized and restricted to food manufacturing SMEs. Another limitation is the subjectivity of SME’s managers when evaluating performance, which may provide imprecise measures of performance.

Practical implications

The findings suggest the notion that success of halal standard implementation depends on the capabilities of SMEs to convert the external pressures into internal motivation. Moreover, food-manufacturing SMEs should consider halal standard as an innovative tool to be applied in their daily operation and production as the halal standard has a significant role in influencing SME’s performance.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this research is the first attempt in integrating drivers, halal standard implementation and performance in the specific context of food manufacturing SMEs in Indonesia.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 11 February 2014

Hayati Habibah Abdul Talib, Khairul Anuar Mohd Ali and Fazli Idris

The purpose of this research is to identify and validate a measurement model for assessing the quality management practices among small and medium-sized enterprises…

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4034

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to identify and validate a measurement model for assessing the quality management practices among small and medium-sized enterprises, specifically for the food processing industry in developing countries such as Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was initially conducted among SMEs using a questionnaire mailed to the managing director of companies selected from the SMECorp directory. A total of 207 respondents from SMEs were used for further analysis. Two steps of analysis were undertaken to validate the measurement model of critical success factors: principal component analysis and confirmatory analysis.

Findings

Eight critical success factors of quality management practices are proposed for assessing quality management practices among SMEs in the food processing industry in Malaysia. A measurement model was then developed. PCA with Varimax rotation revealed 13 components, eight of which were retained for further analysis. First- and second-order CFAs identified the CSF measurement model along with the goodness-of-fit index. Thus, the findings also reveal the status of quality management practices among food processing SMEs in Malaysia.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is to evaluate only the CSFs; therefore, further work is needed to evaluate the relationship between CSFs and organisational performance of SMEs in the food processing industry in Malaysia.

Originality/value

There are various papers regarding the assessment of quality management, especially on TQM practices in various industries. However, few assessments of the critical success factors of quality management practices of SMEs in the food processing industry, especially in developing countries like Malaysia, have been found to date. The findings of this paper will help the industry to identify its current quality management practice to focus on improving its performance.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

Richard Bent, Claire E.A. Seaman and Arthur Ingram

Examines the factors which affect staff motivation and satisfaction in small food businesses. Explores previous theories of motivation. Thirty‐eight small food processing

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11521

Abstract

Examines the factors which affect staff motivation and satisfaction in small food businesses. Explores previous theories of motivation. Thirty‐eight small food processing and manufacturing companies in Scotland formed the sample. Interviews and open‐ended semi‐structured questionnaires were employed in the research. Results emphasise the importance of the management style of the owner/manager particularly when it comes to factors such as “lack of appreciation”, “poor communication” and “training”.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 101 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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