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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2010

Richard Carew and Wojciech J. Florkowski

This paper aims to examine the contribution of physical capital, skilled labor, research and development (R&D), and imports to the productivity of ten Canadian food and…

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1260

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the contribution of physical capital, skilled labor, research and development (R&D), and imports to the productivity of ten Canadian food and beverage manufacturing sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

A Cobb‐Douglas production function is estimated to discern the relative contribution of physical versus R&D knowledge capital in fostering productivity growth. The paper uses a balanced panel dataset and is based on pooled cross‐sectional time series data for ten food and beverage manufacturing industries over the period 1994‐2005. The methodological framework adopted in this paper is a cross‐sectionally correlated and time‐wise autoregressive model. Data employed in this paper are from Statistics Canada's annual survey of manufacturing industries and Canadian Socio‐economic Information Management computerized database.

Findings

The results show that food manufacturing productivity for ten food and beverage sectors is more responsive to physical capital than R&D knowledge capital. Some of the other determinants of labor productivity in food manufacturing included the contribution from university‐educated workers.

Originality/value

The paper is useful to both policy makers and academics in the research fields of R&D and productivity. It provides some interesting insights into the contribution of physical and knowledge capital to food manufacturing industry productivity.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 112 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Remko I. van Hoek

Both postponement and outsourcing have been identified as important characteristics of modern and competitive supply chains. The implementation of postponement may require…

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4594

Abstract

Both postponement and outsourcing have been identified as important characteristics of modern and competitive supply chains. The implementation of postponement may require extensive (spatial) reconfiguration of the supply chain. Presents findings from interviews with managers of food, electronics, automotive and clothing manufacturers in The Netherlands, Belgium and Germany. Findings reveal that in food supply chains both postponement and outsourcing are applied to a lesser extent than in other industries. Reasons, which refer to the industry‐specific characteristics, are given. Ways for food companies to assure competitiveness are then described on the dimensions of postponement, outsourcing and spatial reconfiguration. A framework is developed to position chains in terms of degree of outsourcing, level of postponement and spatial configuration. The framework can help managers diagnosing and repositioning their organizations, along the dimensions mentioned.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Shellyanne Wilson

The food and beverage industry, particularly the agro‐processing and packaging industry, plays a critical role in the economies of Latin America and Caribbean countries…

Abstract

Purpose

The food and beverage industry, particularly the agro‐processing and packaging industry, plays a critical role in the economies of Latin America and Caribbean countries. To remain competitive and to increase competitiveness, companies operating in this industry must achieve operational efficiency – where one contributing factor would be the efficient management of their work‐in‐progress (WIP) inventories.

Design/methodology/approach

Constructs from related manufacturing management research areas such as manufacturing strategy and coordination theory, are incorporated into a conceptual framework to examine the reasons WIP are needed in food plants. The framework is used to inform the development of an audit tool, which is applied in a case study.

Findings

An audit tool is proposed, which can be used by practitioners to review the structural and infrastructural decisions that impact WIP.

Research limitations/implications

The audit tool is applied in one case study. Further application of the tool will test its overall comprehensiveness.

Practical implications

The audit tool can be used as part of a structured decision making process.

Originality/value

The paper brings together a number of constructs to create an audit tool that can be used in both greenfield and existing plants in the food industry.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Rao Sanaullah Khan, John Vincent Grigor, Alan G. Win and Mike Boland

The purpose of this paper is to sketch a comparative account of NPD approaches between registered New Zealand food companies that are doing some sort of functional foods

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1382

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to sketch a comparative account of NPD approaches between registered New Zealand food companies that are doing some sort of functional foods (FF) development (Group 1) and those that are not (Group 2); to generate a better understanding of differences and commonalities in their NPD approaches from resource-based view of competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper opted an exploratory approach using a quantitative survey across food manufacturing companies in New Zealand. The primary foci of this empirical investigation were: orientation towards the NPD, innovation processes, collaborative NPD links and routes to commercialisation.

Findings

The results (based on a 22 per cent response rate) show a significant difference (p<0.05) in the aims and mode of NPD between Groups 1 and 2. Further it was observed that food companies in Group 1 have significantly (p<0.05) more diverse external collaborations with broader aims to collaborate, in comparison with food companies in Group 2.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted in New Zealand and thus generalisability of the findings may have to be interpreted carefully.

Practical implications

The traditional NPD approach (independent and closed NPD), with loose intellectual property protection practices, dominates the food manufacturing industry in New Zealand. Research-oriented collaborations need to be strengthened in their scope and content to develop the innovative capabilities and capacities of small and medium enterprises (SME's) within future value-added food productions.

Originality/value

This research provides the comparative narration of innovation process of food manufacturing companies with reference to FFs development.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Sarina Abdul Halim Lim, Jiju Antony, Zhen He and Norin Arshed

Statistical process control (SPC) is widely applied for control and improve processes in manufacturing, but very few studies have reported on the successful application of…

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1263

Abstract

Purpose

Statistical process control (SPC) is widely applied for control and improve processes in manufacturing, but very few studies have reported on the successful application of SPC in the food industry, in particular. The purpose of this paper is to critically assess the status of SPC in the UK food manufacturing industry and to suggest future research avenues.

Design/methodology/approach

A research project was carried out in the UK food manufacturing sector through questionnaires. The results of the study were analysed using descriptive statistics and statistical tests to be applied in the hypothesis testing.

Findings

Findings revealed that 45 per cent of the respondents are SPC users and x ¯ -R and x ¯ -S charts are the most commonly applied SPC charts in this industry. It was determined that top management commitment is the most critical factor, while lack of SPC training is the most alarming challenge, and lack of awareness of SPC and its benefits are the main reasons for the food companies not implementing SPC.

Research limitations/implications

The study considered only the food manufacturing companies. Future research could be addressed toward the food service and food supply chain.

Practical implications

The paper provides information to food companies in the UK on most common practiced and important quality tools, SPC charts and critical success factors in the food industry. Moreover, the most challenging factors of SPC implementation in the food industry are presented.

Originality/value

This study depicted the current state of SPC practices in the food industry and the process performance in SPC and non-SPC companies is compared.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Kishor Sharma

Most studies of intra‐industry trade (IIT) in manufacturing exclude the processed food sub‐sector (standard international trade classification (SITC) subgroups 0‐1) from…

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970

Abstract

Most studies of intra‐industry trade (IIT) in manufacturing exclude the processed food sub‐sector (standard international trade classification (SITC) subgroups 0‐1) from their analysis on the grounds that trade in this category is predominantly determined by the availability of natural resources in the country in question. However, this can produce misleading results, because the processed food industry is also subject to scale economies and product differentiation that determine IIT. Econometric investigations support most theoretical hypotheses, especially when the model of IIT is tested using the broad manufacturing data that include both the manufacturing commodity (SITC subgroups 5‐8) and processed food (SITC subgroups 0‐1). Results suggest that product differentiation and scale economies contribute positively to IIT, while trade protection discourages IIT.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Janek Ratnatunga

Reports the findings of a study conducted to explain the recentpoor performances of the Australian food‐processing industry, byhistorically analysing the structural…

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2308

Abstract

Reports the findings of a study conducted to explain the recent poor performances of the Australian food‐processing industry, by historically analysing the structural determinants and intensity of competition that prevailed in the early 1980s. Covers the period 1979 to 1985 in depth using a research design that incorporates information from both published sources and empirical interviews of senior marketing executives. Using the Porter framework, an accepted approach to the structural analysis of industries, demonstrates that the food industry was one of the most competitive industries in the world in the early 1980s. Attempts to analyse the resultant implications of such competitive pressures on industry performance in the 1990s.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 97 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1985

Keri Davies, Colin Gilligan and Clive Sutton

The structure of the UK food manufacturing industry is highly fragmented and consists of some 5,000 firms. Of these, however, the ten largest companies are estimated to…

Abstract

The structure of the UK food manufacturing industry is highly fragmented and consists of some 5,000 firms. Of these, however, the ten largest companies are estimated to account for one‐third of all sales. The importance of the 100 largest private sector firms has traditionally been relatively high within the industry and in 1975, for example, they produced 55 per cent of the food sector's net output, compared with the 40 per cent provided by a similar sample in the total manufacturing sector. Similarly, evidence from both Ashby and Mordue demonstrates that during the 1970s the average size of food manufacturers/processors overtook that of manufacturers as a whole in terms of numbers employed. By the same measure, businesses with more than one hundred employees continued to expand at a faster rate in food than the average for all manufacturers, so that the mean employment size of these larger food enterprises in the late 1970s was more than one‐third greater than in all manufacturing. Smaller establishments, by contrast, are relatively under‐represented in the UK food, drink and tobacco sector, both in comparison with the average for all manufacturers and internationally.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

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Article
Publication date: 2 June 2021

Christos Konstantinidis, Stamatis Aggelopoulos, Maria Tsiouni and Evanthia Rizopoulou

The objective of this study is to estimate the competitiveness for both the Greek food and beverage industry as a whole and the flour and milling industry, justifying the…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this study is to estimate the competitiveness for both the Greek food and beverage industry as a whole and the flour and milling industry, justifying the certain economic factors and the way which these factors affect on it.

Design/methodology/approach

The Greek food and beverage firms which published their balance sheets for the studying period were studied. According to the existing literature two equations were created and estimated as a simultaneous equations system.

Findings

Summarizing the results both for the whole food and beverage industry and the flour milling industry are observed significant similarities on how certain economics factors such as profitability, market share, sustainable growth, age and operating costs affect on competitiveness as measured in this work. This may happen due to the high degree of concentration but also in the special characteristics which present both the Greek food and beverage industry and the flour milling sector.

Research limitations/implications

The fact that this work referred only in Greek firms can be a limitation of this research, in spite of that it can provide useful and safe conclusions for the Greek food manufacturing industry.

Practical implications

The provision of proposals for increasing firm competitiveness to managers as well as to policymakers.

Social implications

The importance of food and beverage industry for the Greek economy as well as that the flour milling industry holds an important position in the Greek food and beverage industry makes the study of the competitiveness for both of them to be important from both an academic and research perspective.

Originality/value

The Greek food and beverage industry is the strength of Greek manufacturing and at the same time an important lever for the development of the entire Greek economy. The high quality products it produces and the organized promotion of its products in international markets are elements that give it an advantage and stimulate its competitiveness. The flour milling industry is one of the sectors in which there is intense competition and whose presence in terms of sales, turnover, employment and gross value is particularly important, so a simultaneous study of these cases is very important.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 14 July 2020

Giselle Cappellesso, Cristiano Moreira Raimundo and Karim Marini Thomé

This study aims to measure the intensity of innovation in the Brazilian food sector and compares it to other manufacturing sectors in the country.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to measure the intensity of innovation in the Brazilian food sector and compares it to other manufacturing sectors in the country.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used economic and financial data provided by the annual survey of industry [Pesquisa Industrial Anual (PIAs), in Portuguese] and other supporting data provided by the survey of innovation [Pesquisa de Inovação (PINTEC), in Portuguese] and the classification of technology intensity (TI) proposed by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. The authors subsequently applied the Malmquist index in addition to the data envelopment analysis to measure innovation.

Findings

The results reveal that the Brazilian food sector is classified as a sector with low TI and investment in research and development (R&D), which represents one of the lowest rates when compared to other sectors. Thus, the Brazilian food sector is far from achieving its full potential. Nevertheless, the authors noticed that the sugar refinery industry showed an evolution in its technology frontier and presented a frequency of innovation similar to the average of high-tech industries.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the debate on innovation in the food sector, emphasizing the need to accomplish higher investments in R&D to increase the productivity of the sector.

Details

Innovation & Management Review, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2515-8961

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