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Article
Publication date: 26 February 2021

Mohd Helmi Ali, Mohammad Iranmanesh, Kim Hua Tan, Suhaiza Zailani and Nor Asiah Omar

The current complex halal food supply chain (SC) has caused food scandals, which have illustrated the weakness of multiple food quality standards and certification and…

Abstract

Purpose

The current complex halal food supply chain (SC) has caused food scandals, which have illustrated the weakness of multiple food quality standards and certification and audits in ensuring food safety. Drawn on the resource-based view (RBV) theory, the purpose of this study is to explore the impacts of SC integration (SCI) on halal food SC integrity and, consequently, food quality.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical data were collected from 275 halal-certified food companies in Malaysia and analysed using structural equation modelling – SmartPLS3.0.

Findings

The results confirmed that SCI, including internal, supplier and customer integrations, has significant effects on the dimensions of the halal food SC integrity which, in turn, lead to halal food safety and quality.

Practical implications

The importance of SCI in halal food SC is highlighted in this study. The impact of SCI is contexted in halal food SC integrity and food quality. Therefore, it provides a clear understanding to managers of SC applicability in the halal food industry.

Originality/value

Based on the RBV theory, this study contributes to the limited body of research of the relationships among SCI from the context of the halal industry with a specific focus on food supply chain integrity and food quality.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Mohd Helmi Ali, Kim Hua Tan and Md Daud Ismail

The purpose of this paper is to propose a food supply chain (SC) integrity framework in the context of halal food.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a food supply chain (SC) integrity framework in the context of halal food.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a discussion on the development of food SC integrity framework using triangulation of interviews’ insights with literature.

Findings

Current industry practices such as standards have not been sufficient in embracing the concept of food SC integrity. As the food SC is complex, food SC integrity framework is proposed as a solution. This paper proposes food SC integrity framework for halal food. It consists of four dimensions, namely: raw material, production, service, and information integrity. In addition, key elements for each dimension are derived from the interviews’ insights.

Research limitations/implications

The framework provides the evidence that the safeguarding of halal food integrity does not rely solely on certification; but it requires an extensive effort beyond certification.

Practical implications

Safeguarding of food integrity should involve all stages and actors of the SC. Religious standards should incorporate SC integrity profiling through a controlling mechanism to promote higher food product integrity.

Originality/value

Food SC integrity framework is important to religious food as it plays a significant role to the population. This study contributes to a newly developed SC integrity framework in the context of halal food.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Mohd Helmi Ali, Yuanzhu Zhan, Syed Shah Alam, Ying Kei Tse and Kim Hua Tan

The purpose of this paper is to establish a conceptual model adopted from a strategy-structure-performance paradigm for investigating the fit between the supply chain…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish a conceptual model adopted from a strategy-structure-performance paradigm for investigating the fit between the supply chain integration and halal food supply chain integrity and the impact of halal food supply chain integrity on firms’ performance in a Malaysian context.

Design/methodology/approach

This study comprises a sample of a halal manufacturing firm in Malaysia. A cross-sectional research design was used in this study. Data were gathered based on mailed and personally administered questionnaires. SmartPLS was used to analyse the 254 valid responses.

Findings

The research findings indicate that internal integration and strategy have positive impact on halal food supply chain integrity. The study results confirmed that customer integration and supplier integration contributes to halal food supply chain integrity. It also finds that halal food supply chain integrity has a significantly positive impact.

Research limitations/implications

The results suggested that a strategic collaboration with the supplier pivoted around the quality and integrity of the raw materials should be undertaken.

Practical implications

The results from this study supports that the managers should adopt all halal food supply chain integrity components to achieve a superior performance. Even though some of the components did not yield significant results in terms of their relationships with firms’ performance, these dimensions were generally related to the standardised industry requirements, such as certifications.

Originality/value

The findings are original and unique and are based on established theories from the literature on supply chain management practices. The research findings are useful to academics and policymakers interested in fostering a halal supply chain in Malaysia.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 117 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Jan Mei Soon, Mahmood Chandia and Joe Mac Regenstein

This paper argues that there is an absence of halal integrity within the conventional stages of a food chain. This paper adapts the understanding of the different stages…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper argues that there is an absence of halal integrity within the conventional stages of a food chain. This paper adapts the understanding of the different stages and argues the need to develop a critical consciousness for halal integrity within the food chain to address the needs of the ever-growing Muslim consumers’ market. The purpose of this paper is to propose a definition of halal integrity using farm to fork and global food supply chain models.

Design/methodology/approach

The study includes a review of priori literature and media reports regarding cross-contamination of food products with haram (forbidden) components. This background will be used to conceptualise halal integrity using farm to fork and global supply chain models.

Findings

Different interpretations of halal – what is permitted and what is prohibited – exist for the different schools of Islamic legal thought and within the customs of different countries. In order to ensure that food production is embracive of the religious needs of the global Muslim customer market, this paper utilises the farm to fork and global supply chain models to foster a critical awareness of halal needs. Halal integrity should be clearly presenting the details of the halal status of the product and assuring that the requirements for halal as stated are met. Halal integrity not only deals with permitted and prohibited foods, but that the halal status of the food products (i.e. from raw materials until it reaches the consumers) should not be breached (i.e. no cross-contamination with haram products/methods and no ill intents). A formal definition of halal integrity has been proposed.

Research limitations/implications

The SWOT analyses serve as a guideline as the analysis done may be outdated as the environments are constantly changing.

Originality/value

This research although academic is meant to have a real value in improving the integrity of the halal food supply chain, providing value to the food industry, to countries that are concerned about this supply chain and to Muslim consumers. Halal integrity is crucial to the success of the emerging halal market.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Kim Hua Tan, Mohd Helmi Ali, Zafir Mohd Makhbul and Azman Ismail

Much has been written about the importance of external integration for the integrity of food products. To achieve food integrity, all actors along the supply chain have to…

Abstract

Purpose

Much has been written about the importance of external integration for the integrity of food products. To achieve food integrity, all actors along the supply chain have to be fully integrated and comply with an assurance system or process. The more complex the supply chain operations are, the greater will be the need for integration. This research paper investigates the impact of external integration on compliance with halal standards, as an example of product integrity within the food industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 1,000 food manufacturers was conducted. Partial least squares structural equation modelling was used to test the effect of external integration on compliance with halal standards.

Findings

The results showed that there were links between halal assurance system and external integration. Nevertheless, it was discovered that only customer integration mediated the relationship between the halal assurance system and product quality and production cost.

Practical implications

The practical implications of the findings extend to managers in the food industry who might pursue supply chain integration as a structure to achieve excellence. The findings suggested that the deployment of a halal assurance system has a positive effect on operational performance. Furthermore, the results show that managers who wish to implement the halal assurance system should carefully invest in an external integration strategy, depending upon the operational performance improvement intended.

Originality/value

This research is one of the first studies to investigate the effects of external integration on halal food in general and is the first empirical investigation of the effect of safeguarding halal integrity on operational performance.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2020

Yusaini Hisham Mohamed, Abdul Rahman Abdul Rahim and Azanizawati Ma'aram

The purpose of this study is to outline the results of the empirical testing in the field of halal food supply chain and halal integrity assurance (HIA), as well as to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to outline the results of the empirical testing in the field of halal food supply chain and halal integrity assurance (HIA), as well as to provide a research framework of their relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on the exploratory research paper using quantitative data collection to empirically experimented with concepts and provide practical solutions for halal industry players to optimize their halal food supply chain integrity assurance.

Findings

The findings show the halal supply chain of the food and beverage industry has a significant effect on HIA. The results also suggest the halal industry with a high focus on supply chain business processes and supply chain network structure are expected to have better HIA.

Research limitations/implications

As this study only focuses on the halal industry in Malaysia specifically on food and beverages, its findings cannot be generalized to other categories. Issues of applicability of this study to other countries also need to be considered.

Practical implications

This study addresses the assurance of halal integrity is a crucial element in managing a halal food supply chain in the halal industry. It has empirically identified the important elements to strengthen halal food supply chain integrity assurance in the halal industry.

Social implications

It is important to manage knowledge, commitment and trust in any halal organization as a catalyst for HIA. This study presents a better understanding of the halal concept application in society.

Originality/value

There is a lack of empirical study on halal food supply chain integrity assurance even though the issue of HIA is widely discussed in the halal industry. Thus, this study has used an industry survey to empirically experimented with concepts and provide practical contributions to enhance halal food supply chain integrity assurance.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2019

Norasekin Ab Rashid and Jamil Bojei

Muslim consumers have been shocked with the news of cross-contamination issues in the Halal food that they consumed. These issues make them put more effort in ensuring the…

Abstract

Purpose

Muslim consumers have been shocked with the news of cross-contamination issues in the Halal food that they consumed. These issues make them put more effort in ensuring the products that they purchased being monitored throughout the supply chain. In this case, food companies must be prepared to implement systematic traceability system to ensure the authenticity of Halal products and comprehend the importance of Halal industry environmental factors (HIEF) in enhancing integrity of Halal food supply chain and protect from any risk of cross-contaminations. This paper aims to clarify the relationship between the Halal traceability system adoption (HTSA) and HIEFs on Halal food supply chain integrity (HFSCIn).

Design/methodology/approach

The study opted quantitative research approach by using the self-administrated questionnaires. The questionnaires were distributed during Malaysia International Halal Showcase (MIHAS) 2014 and Halal Fiesta Malaysia (HALFEST) 2014. 127 Malaysian Halal food and beverages companies have been involved in the study. Most of the respondents are the general manager or owner of the company, Halal executives, quality assurance managers, operation managers and sales manager.

Findings

The study found that there is a significant relationship between HTSA and HIEF on HFSCIn. The study also found that the highest adoptions of Halal traceability system are among the producer and end user, while the highest contributions in influencing the HIEF are the economic and socio-cultural factors.

Research limitations/implications

This study only focused on Halal food industry particularly the food and beverages category. Thus, future study can explore further on every category in food industry such as raw materials and ingredients; poultry, meat and dairy; fast food and premises and make comparison between pharmaceutical, cosmetics and health care in Halal industry. In addition, the sample size (N = 127) can be considered small; therefore, it is recommended that in future the subject matter be explored with a much larger sample to allow generalization of the result.

Originality/value

This study provided, perhaps for the first time, an analysis of the relationship between traceability adoptions and HIEF on HFSCIn.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Chao-shih Wang, David D. Van Fleet and Ashok K. Mishra

The purpose of this paper is to proffer an alternative conceptualization of food integrity and a market-based food integrity intelligence system.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to proffer an alternative conceptualization of food integrity and a market-based food integrity intelligence system.

Design/methodology/approach

Food fraud is interpreted as a symptom of asymmetric knowledge. Consumer collaboration for knowledge exchange and diffusion of innovation (KEDI) safeguards food markets. The concept of communicative action is applied to conceptualize and analyze key elements for designing a collaborative food integrity intelligence system.

Findings

The model of market-based KEDI consists of three dimensions: intelligence flows, organization memory, and social sensitivities. Decentralized control is crucial to effect system innovation.

Originality/value

The paper integrates managerial, marketing, and economic approaches and develops a model for managing food integrity intelligence.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Louise Manning

Abstract

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Rebecca K. Davidson, Wilson Antunes, Elisabeth H. Madslien, José Belenguer, Marco Gerevini, Tomas Torroba Perez and Raffaello Prugger

Consumer confidence in the European food industry has been shaken by a number of recent scandals due to food fraud and accidental contamination, reminding the authors that…

Abstract

Purpose

Consumer confidence in the European food industry has been shaken by a number of recent scandals due to food fraud and accidental contamination, reminding the authors that deliberate incidents can occur. Food defence methods aim to prevent or mitigate deliberate attacks on the food supply chain but are not a legal requirement. The purpose of this paper is to discuss how proactive and reactive food defence practices can help prevent or mitigate malicious attacks on the food chain and also food fraud, food crime and food safety. The authors look at how food defence differs from food safety and how it contributes to food supply chain integrity.

Design/methodology/approach

Food defence has been the focus of two different EU FP7 security projects, EDEN and SNIFFER. Food industry stakeholders participated in workshops and demonstrations on food defence and relevant technology was tested in different food production scenarios.

Findings

Food industry end-users reported a lack of knowledge regarding food defence practices. They wished for further guidelines and training on risk assessment as well as access to validated test methods. Novel detection tools and methods showed promise with authentication, identification, measurement, assessment and control at multiple levels of the food supply chain prior to distribution and retail.

Practical implications

The prevention of a contamination incident, prior to retail, costs less than dealing with a large foodborne disease outbreak. Food defence should therefore be integral to food supply chain integrity and not just an afterthought in the wake of an incident.

Originality/value

It is argued that food defence practices have a vital role to play across the board in unintentional and intentional food contamination incidents. The application of these methods can help ensure food supply chain integrity.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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