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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2009

Pornlert Arpanutud, Suwimon Keeratipibul, Araya Charoensupaya and Eunice Taylor

The purpose of this paper is to investigate factors affecting the adoption of food‐safety management systems by Thai food‐manufacturing firms.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate factors affecting the adoption of food‐safety management systems by Thai food‐manufacturing firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs a survey questionnaire using a sample of Thai food‐manufacturing firms. The three‐part questionnaire was mailed to managers performing food‐safety management activities in 480 firms. A total of 217 questionnaires were returned, with a response rate of 45.2 percent.

Findings

The results of hypothesis testing indicated that the adoption of a food safety management system can be significantly predicted by: expected gain of social legitimacy; expected gain of economic competitiveness; perceived importance of external stakeholders (government, community, food safety organizations, and media); top management commitment to food safety; firm size and amount of export sales. It can also be predicted by the extent to which firms exchange food safety knowledge with other stakeholders.

Practical implications

The results of the study suggest that the Government should formulate food safety policies in favour of educating senior managers in the potential benefits of food safety management systems for their firms. In addition it confirms the importance of Government information dissemination on the successful adoption of such systems and the need to focus Government resources on assisting smaller firms. The findings present evidence of the commercial benefits of system adoption.

Original/value

The paper identifies statistically significant factors that can “predict” the uptake of food safety management systems within the Thai food industry.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 111 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Patrick McNamee, Kathleen Greenan and Brendan McFerran

The economic contribution that small firms make is being increasingly recognised. Consequently robust strategic benchmarks for small firms must be extremely valuable not…

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2923

Abstract

The economic contribution that small firms make is being increasingly recognised. Consequently robust strategic benchmarks for small firms must be extremely valuable not just for the firms themselves but also for the wider economic community. The Competitive Analysis Model (CAM) is a new approach to the strategic benchmarking of small firms. Currently this model comprises 893 firms on which are held 320 separate data items. These data items are used to provide individual firm reports so that participating firms can benchmark their performance in terms of measures such as: growth rates, internal performance measures, external performance measures and strategic priorities. The benchmarks are provided in two major manners: sectoral comparisons so that a firm can benchmark its performance with others of a similar size in the same industry sub‐sector and cross‐sectional comparisons so that a firm can benchmark its performance with others of similar size irrespective of the industry in which they operate. This article describes the operation of CAM and illustrates its operations through a typical CAM report.

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Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2020

Philippos Karipidis, Polymeros Chrysochou and Ioanna Karypidou

The purpose of this study is to explore how food-exporting firms assess the importance of relationship characteristics of the supply chain that impact their performance as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore how food-exporting firms assess the importance of relationship characteristics of the supply chain that impact their performance as well as how it relates to export performance indicators.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was administered across 83 food firms in Greece, assessing the importance of relationship characteristics of the supply chain by using the best–worst scaling technique.

Findings

The most important characteristics relate to the quality of the primary material and the procurement costs and producer prices; these are considered more important by export-oriented food firms compared to non–export-oriented food firms. Characteristics that relate to the relationship between members of the agri-food supply chain and the interorganizational business systems and governance mechanisms are also considered of average importance. Characteristics related to the adoption of differentiation strategies are considered least important.

Practical implications

Producers should emphasize the quality and prices of their product as well as establish collaborations with food firms. Food firms need to emphasize interorganizational business systems and governance mechanisms that reduce procurement costs, instead of trying to reduce producer prices. Public authorities should engage stakeholders of the agri-food supply chain in relationships that will enable food firms to deliver on their quality and price demands.

Originality/value

Primary production and collaborations of it with food firms have not been studied in regards to what extent they relate to food firms' export performance.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Tessa Avermaete, Jacques Viaene, Eleanor J. Morgan and Nick Crawford

This paper focuses on innovation in small food‐ and drink‐manufacturing enterprises in two Belgian regions. The aim of the research was to identify patterns of innovative…

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8426

Abstract

This paper focuses on innovation in small food‐ and drink‐manufacturing enterprises in two Belgian regions. The aim of the research was to identify patterns of innovative activities. Based on both literature and empirical analyses, a framework was developed to help in understanding some aspects of the determinants of innovation in small food firms. Two conclusions can be drawn from the research. On the one hand, it is clear that innovation was regarded as essential by most small food firms. Such firms tended to continuously introduce new products, develop new processes, make changes in the organisational structure and explore new markets. On the other hand, the research demonstrated that some aspects of innovation depend on the age of the company, company size and regional economic performance.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Haiyan Deng, Ruifa Hu, Jikun Huang, Carl Pray, Yanhong Jin and Zhonghua Li

Economic interest groups such as seed, pesticide, feed, and food companies play an important role in supporting or preventing the production of genetically modified (GM…

Abstract

Purpose

Economic interest groups such as seed, pesticide, feed, and food companies play an important role in supporting or preventing the production of genetically modified (GM) crops. The purpose of this paper is to examine firm managers’ attitudes toward GM technology, biotechnology R&D investment, and political lobbying activities.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from surveys of 160 managers in the food, feed, chemical, and seed industries in 2013-2014, this paper employed three probit models to examine the determinants of managers’ attitudes, biotechnology R&D investment, and lobbying activities.

Findings

The results show that most Chinese agribusiness managers are concerned about GM foods and oppose its adoption. Nevertheless, one-third of the firms invest in biotechnology R&D and less than 15 percent of managers lobbied the government to change biotechnology policies. The econometric estimation results suggest that profit change expectation is the main factor affecting managers’ attitudes and biotechnology R&D investment decisions, whereas lobbying activities are significantly influenced by their attitudes and biotechnology R&D investment. In addition, managers’ attitudes toward GM foods also significantly influence firms’ decisions to invest in biotechnology R&D.

Originality/value

This paper has improved on previous research in two ways. First, it analyses the determinants of agribusiness firm managers’ attitudes toward GM technology, biotechnology R&D investment, and lobbying activities. Second, the methodology involves an analysis of agribusiness firm survey data in the food, feed, chemical, and seed industries, which is the first time to use such data to research on economic interest group in agricultural biotechnology field.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Markus Orava and Patricia Wiklund

The growing interest in food safety has led to food‐testing services becoming an issue of increasing importance. The demand for outsourced food‐testing services is…

Abstract

The growing interest in food safety has led to food‐testing services becoming an issue of increasing importance. The demand for outsourced food‐testing services is growing. One of the results of these developments has been the internationalisation of such firms. This paper analyses the internationalisation of food‐testing services in the light of developments in the Nordic food‐testing market. The focus is on the external elements. These include development of the market to allow food‐testing firms to overcome problems and exploit opportunities arising from the fundamental changes in the nature of the market. The adopted internationalisation strategies of the Nordic food‐testing companies are studied. The key driver for internationalisation of firms is growth. Successful firms also need to maintain high levels of quality, speed of delivery, and competitive pricing.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 106 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Nasir Uddin

The purpose of this paper is to explore how structural and economic issues of organising inter-firm relationships influence a supply chain (SC) performance, by using the…

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1923

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how structural and economic issues of organising inter-firm relationships influence a supply chain (SC) performance, by using the insight of organisational theories and institutional economics.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is an exploratory field study in the Australian agri-food industries. Using a conceptual model and a set of semi-structured interview questions, data collection was done through in-depth interviews with eight agri-food firms from the agri-food SCs in Western Australia (WA).

Findings

The findings demonstrated the requirement of higher coordination and integration from the downstream industries to include upstream producers as the integral part of the SC.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on eight in-depth interviews on cross-sectional food SCs in WA and generalises the result for the overall food industry in WA.

Originality/value

The study provides valuable information to the existing literature on industrial management and has important value to the users of agri-food SCs. It provides empirical evidence of the factors of SC performance for agri-food producers, processors and retailers, other stakeholders and government agencies for their planning and benchmarking.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 117 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2019

Annalisa De Boni and Maria Bonaventura Forleo

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the trends and prospects for the development of the halal market for Italian foods, with a focus on pasta production as one of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the trends and prospects for the development of the halal market for Italian foods, with a focus on pasta production as one of the most valued products of the Made in Italy brand. The analysis takes into consideration drivers and obstacles for developing halal orientation strategies in world and internal markets and opportunities and threats for Italian food firms.

Design/methodology/approach

Market dynamics were investigated by a forecasting tool, the Delphi method, which aims to explore future market trends and give suggestions for firm strategies and policy intervention. Besides firms, other experts involved in the Italian halal food sector were interviewed. Answers were organised according to the level of importance given to the different issues and to the level of agreement between the opinions of the experts. These findings were then discussed in relation to the contexts, both external and internal to companies, that had given rise to such opinions.

Findings

The halal food market represents a good opportunity for enlarging the overseas markets for Italian products and producers. Several external and internal factors related to the demographic, the institutional, the market and the firm contexts, emerged. The challenges that non-Islamic countries, markets and firms face in the adoption of halal strategies are mainly due to the institutional context, to the scarce awareness of halal principles and practices, and to some suspicion of Islamic food and culture that does not yet seem well-known and accepted on the domestic market.

Originality/value

The Islamic food market has still to be fully explored in Italy, this is despite strongly emerging demand and a growing number of firms showing interest in implementing halal certification and entering new Islamic markets. The paper findings contribute to the scarce empirical literature about the halal market in Italy and give some recommendations both for supporting further studies, identifying preliminary implications and suggesting policy measures.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1991

V.N. Balasubramanyam and D.T. Nguyen

This paper reviews the nature, extent, and determinants of the overseas operations of the British food and drink processing industries with a view to analysing the…

Abstract

This paper reviews the nature, extent, and determinants of the overseas operations of the British food and drink processing industries with a view to analysing the competitiveness of the sector in international markets.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 14 no. 7/8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Mohd Helmi Ali, Yuanzhu Zhan, Syed Shah Alam, Ying Kei Tse and Kim Hua Tan

The purpose of this paper is to establish a conceptual model adopted from a strategy-structure-performance paradigm for investigating the fit between the supply chain…

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1932

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish a conceptual model adopted from a strategy-structure-performance paradigm for investigating the fit between the supply chain integration and halal food supply chain integrity and the impact of halal food supply chain integrity on firms’ performance in a Malaysian context.

Design/methodology/approach

This study comprises a sample of a halal manufacturing firm in Malaysia. A cross-sectional research design was used in this study. Data were gathered based on mailed and personally administered questionnaires. SmartPLS was used to analyse the 254 valid responses.

Findings

The research findings indicate that internal integration and strategy have positive impact on halal food supply chain integrity. The study results confirmed that customer integration and supplier integration contributes to halal food supply chain integrity. It also finds that halal food supply chain integrity has a significantly positive impact.

Research limitations/implications

The results suggested that a strategic collaboration with the supplier pivoted around the quality and integrity of the raw materials should be undertaken.

Practical implications

The results from this study supports that the managers should adopt all halal food supply chain integrity components to achieve a superior performance. Even though some of the components did not yield significant results in terms of their relationships with firms’ performance, these dimensions were generally related to the standardised industry requirements, such as certifications.

Originality/value

The findings are original and unique and are based on established theories from the literature on supply chain management practices. The research findings are useful to academics and policymakers interested in fostering a halal supply chain in Malaysia.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 117 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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