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Article
Publication date: 29 December 2021

Yong You Nie, Austin Rong-Da Liang and En Ci Wang

The purpose of the present study is to examine the effect of organic food certification labels of different third-party verification institutions on consumers' choice of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present study is to examine the effect of organic food certification labels of different third-party verification institutions on consumers' choice of organic food in terms of willingness-to-pay (WTP) using cue utilization theory.

Design/methodology/approach

The study conducted an experiment in which organic rice and organic certification labels were presented to 360 valid participants.

Findings

With different organic rice labels issued by various third-party verification institutions, including (1) foundations, (2) associations, (3) university certification centers and (4) private businesses, results indicate that consumers had different preferences and WTP for certain labels. The institutions preferred organic food labels issued by non-profit organizations. In addition, consumers showed different WTP as a result of different purchase motivations (e.g. health vs environmental protection).

Originality/value

These results imply that consumers might not have confidence in the organic labels issued by associations and private institutions. Therefore, different types of certification institutions can have significantly different impacts on consumers' WTP. The study further proposes that the extrinsic attributes of food products (i.e. the cues used in making a purchase decision) must be incongruent with the image of third-party certification institutions in order to develop more efficient communication of product information and to encourage consumers to give positive comments regarding organic food.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 124 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

Zihan Nie, Nico Heerink, Qin Tu and Shuqin Jin

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of adopting certified food production on chemical fertilizer and pesticide use in China.

1889

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of adopting certified food production on chemical fertilizer and pesticide use in China.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors estimate fixed effect models to track the changes in agrochemical consumption at household level over time and evaluate the effect of certified food production, using an unbalanced panel data set covering 4,830 households in six provinces over the period 2005–2013.

Findings

On average, the authors do not find significant effects of certified food production on either chemical fertilizer or pesticide consumption among Chinese farmers. The effects are heterogeneous across villages, but the heterogeneous effects show no clear pattern that is consistent with different types of certification. The findings are robust to the use of alternative panel structure and certification indicators. The lack of knowledge about certification among farmers, the price premium and differences in regulation enforcement across regions may explain why the authors do not find negative effects on agrochemical use.

Practical implications

This study suggests that careful inspections and strong enforcement of certified food production is needed to ensure that the environmental goals of certified food production can be achieved and the reputation of certification in China can be improved. The inspection of certification producers and the enforcement of current regulations should be stricter for the further healthy development of certified food production in China.

Originality/value

This study is the first attempt to systematically evaluate the impact of food certification on the use of agrochemicals in Chinese agriculture.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

Mohamed Syazwan Ab Talib, Siti Salwa Md. Sawari, Abu Bakar Abdul Hamid and Thoo Ai Chin

The emergence of the Halal food market as one of the largest consumer food markets has encouraged firms to implement Halal food certification. However, the theoretical gap…

3606

Abstract

Purpose

The emergence of the Halal food market as one of the largest consumer food markets has encouraged firms to implement Halal food certification. However, the theoretical gap in Halal studies and the unequal focus of Halal food certification research prove the deficiency of theoretical development and understanding. Hence, this paper aims to ascertain the theoretical background of Halal food certificate implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews and synthesises literature focusing on Halal certification, food certification and the Institutional Theory factors that could potentially explain the impetus of Halal food certificate implementation.

Findings

The Institutional Theory offers a suitable explanation that grounds the motivation to implement Halal food certification. The highly institutionalised Halal industry comprising government regulations, Muslim demands for Halal foods and intense industry competition instigate Halal food certificate implementation. Three propositions are presented and a conceptual model is developed.

Research limitations/implications

The notions of this paper are based on the institutional perspective, i.e. the external motivation factors. An alternative view on a management theory that explains the internal motivation factors would provide a more comprehensive interpretation of reasons to implement Halal food certification. Nevertheless, the Institutional Theory offers strong understandings behind the motivation to implement Halal food certification.

Practical implications

Discussions and propositions from this paper could contribute to theory formation that is unique to Halal or Muslim food certification. This paper could also provide a sense of direction for researchers in mapping out future research undertakings.

Originality/value

The paper presents a valuable understanding of the dynamic of the Institutional Theory in the field of Halal food certification. It is the first attempt that considers the institutional isomorphism of government decree, consumer demand and inter-firm competition as motivation factors of Halal food certificate implementation.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 39 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Mohamed Syazwan Ab Talib, Abu Bakar Abdul Hamid and Thoo Ai Chin

– The purpose of this paper is to review, analyse, and synthesise the motivation and limitation factors in implementing Halal food certification.

2728

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review, analyse, and synthesise the motivation and limitation factors in implementing Halal food certification.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic online library search gathered 50 recent journal articles between the years 2004 and 2014. After common motivation and limitation factors were identified and reviewed, a Pareto analysis was performed. This is done to prioritise the motivation and limitation factors and ultimately revealed the major factors that influence the implementation of Halal food certification.

Findings

A total of 36 motivation and 37 limitation factors were identified. Through Pareto analysis, 15 motivation factors accounted for 80.07 per cent and 20 limitation factors are responsible for 79.65 per cent. These factors are considered the major factors in implementing Halal food certification.

Practical implications

For academicians, this study provides the most recent review of food safety and quality certification literature and the highlighted factors could assist in designing research instruments and set the foundation for future research endeavours. For industrialists, factors drawn from this study highlight the information critical for effective and efficient decision making.

Originality/value

This paper is unique as it is the first study to review and analyse the relevant literature from which the authors synthesised the major factors in implementing Halal food certification. The result of this study will provide greater insights to researchers, food companies, and other stakeholders in an effort to encourage greater implementation of Halal food certification.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 April 2022

Richard Kwasi Bannor, Bismark Amfo and Helena Oppong-Kyeremeh

The authors assessed the certification of street food retailers in Ghana in terms of awareness, training, willingness to be certified, determinants, agreement with…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors assessed the certification of street food retailers in Ghana in terms of awareness, training, willingness to be certified, determinants, agreement with certification requirements and impacts on performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data was sourced from 200 street food retailers. Descriptive statistics, Likert scale, mean comparison test, heteroskedastic probit, inverse-probability-weighted regression adjustment (IPWRA), inverse probability weights (IPW) and augmented inverse-probability weighting (AIPW) were applied.

Findings

Most uncertified retailers were willing to be certified. Awareness about certification was high. Most of the certified retailers had been trained on certification, while most uncertified retailers had not been trained. Being a female, being educated, being a migrant vendor, possessing experience in retailing, training in certification, trust in the local certification process, the amount spent in preparing food and the number of customers are crucial variables that increase the probability of being certified among street food vendors. Street food retailers agreed to all the requirements for certification. Certification boosts the performance of street food retailers in terms of the number of customers and contracts received. Training on certification is recommended for street food retailers.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation of this study is mainly due to the type of food retailers selected. Street food vending in Ghana is done among those who cook food for selling, those who sell processed products such as drinks and those who sell vegetables and other uncooked agriproducts. Meanwhile, the authors selected unorganised retailers who primarily cook local and regional dishes for sale in this study. Thus, the study did not include organised food retailers such as restaurants. Therefore, generalising the study results for street food vendors should be made with caution.

Originality/value

Several studies have been conducted on street food retailing across the globe on knowledge of food-safety practices, risk practices, bacterial contamination of street retailing food, toxicological hazards of street foods and compliance with technical and hygienic requirements by street food retailers, among others. However, empirical studies on the certification/licensing of street food retailers and its impact have been given little attention. As a result, this study investigates the certification of street food retailers and its impacts on retailers' performance in Ghana.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 50 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2020

Norliza Katuk, Ku Ruhana Ku-Mahamud, Kalsom Kayat, Mohd. Noor Abdul Hamid, Nur Haryani Zakaria and Ayi Purbasari

Halal tourism is a subset of tourism activities geared towards Muslim which are aligned with the Islamic principles. As a response to this, many food operators have…

1057

Abstract

Purpose

Halal tourism is a subset of tourism activities geared towards Muslim which are aligned with the Islamic principles. As a response to this, many food operators have realised the importance of having a halal certification to establish a better market position. In the context of Indonesia, it is yet to be known what attitudes the food operators have towards halal certification and what attributes characterised those who have obtained the certification. Therefore, this study aims to examine the attributes of food operators and their attitudes towards halal certification in Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey and structured interview were conducted on 298 food operators in Bandung, a city in Indonesia, between August and December 2018. Seven hypotheses were proposed and tested to evaluate the association between halal certification and food operators’ attributes and their attitudes towards it.

Findings

The results of the study suggested that food operators who had halal certification can be characterised by the number of branches the businesses have, the knowledge of halal tourism and knowledge on the market segment. However, the age of their business was found not related to halal certification. In terms of attitudes, the study found that performance beliefs, intention to apply and target market segment had associated with halal certification.

Practical implications

The outcomes of the study could provide information to entities and agencies involved in the tourism industry that consider targeting Muslim travellers as their market segment. Halal certification could be an approach to facilitate tourism marketing and consequently increase the performance of food-related business sectors.

Originality/value

This study provides evidence that could lead to a better understanding of the attributes of food operators and their attitudes towards halal certification in the context of Indonesia’s tourism industry.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 December 2018

Khawaja Muhammad Imran Bashir, Jin-Soo Kim, Md Mohibbullah, Jae Hak Sohn and Jae-Suk Choi

This study aims to investigate the current and future status of overseas halal food marketing and develops strategies for improving the competitiveness of Korean seafood…

1439

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the current and future status of overseas halal food marketing and develops strategies for improving the competitiveness of Korean seafood companies in the global halal food market.

Design/methodology/approach

The research uses a case study approach and a semi-structured review of previously published data. Evidence collected from literature reviews, supported by research studies, anecdotal proof, personal reflection and experience is also used. It also considers the perspectives of various stakeholder groups in the global halal food supply chain.

Findings

The global halal food market is forecasted to reach US$1.914tn in 2021. At present, Korea holds a small share of this market. To enter the emerging Islamic market, there is a need to develop strategies. This study recommends the following main strategies to improve the competitiveness of Korean seafood companies in the halal food market: reduce mistrust by improving halal authentication and certification standards; understand consumer behavior and develop marketing strategies according to the respective country’s socioeconomic and geographic status; train industry employees and develop competitive halal seafood products; exploit the rising global influence of Hanryu; establish a halal logistics/supply chain and halal industrial parks; and promote digital marketing and tourism. Moreover, the government should also subsidize halal seafood development, as well as provide export and international trade insurances.

Originality/value

As the Muslim population continues to grow, the importance of global halal food marketing also increases. Therefore, strategies for improving the competitiveness of Korean seafood companies in the global halal food market need to be taken into account.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 February 2021

Eluiza Alberto de Morais Watanabe, Solange Alfinito and Luisa Lourenço Barbirato

Organic food consumption is growing, increasing the need for studies investigating the importance of organic certification labels in emerging countries. The research aims…

Abstract

Purpose

Organic food consumption is growing, increasing the need for studies investigating the importance of organic certification labels in emerging countries. The research aims to identify the influence of certification labels and fresh organic produce categories (greenery, vegetable or fruit) on consumer trust and purchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

An online experimental survey 3 × 3 was administered among 349 Brazilian consumers. Certification label and fresh organic produce category were designated as independent variables and manipulated to explore consumer trust and purchase intention. The authors performed a multivariate covariance analysis (MANCOVA) to analyze the data.

Findings

Results show that the certification label does not directly affect the dependent variables. It acts as a moderator and indirectly affects both consumer trust and purchase intention. Moreover, depending on the fresh organic produce category considered (greenery, vegetable or fruit), consumer trust changes. Sociodemographic characteristics, age and household income are also important. Finally, the greater the purchase frequency (the main predictor of the model), the greater the purchase intention and consumer trust.

Originality/value

The study contributes to deepen and expand studies involving organic food and to pave the way for future studies that aim to investigate the importance of certification labels of organic foods for consumers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Valeria Sodano, Martin Hingley and Adam Lindgreen

The aim of this paper is to assess the welfare effects of the newest trends in food safety policies characterised by the shift from public to private intervention.

2016

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to assess the welfare effects of the newest trends in food safety policies characterised by the shift from public to private intervention.

Design/methodology/approach

Food safety policies are analysed through concepts of new economic sociology, with a critical review of the literature on social capital.

Findings

The article shows that as food safety and quality attributes responsible for the exchange complexity are simply codified and enforced through standards and third‐party certification, the global value chain governance shifts from a relational type to a power‐based type, with possible negative welfare effects.

Research limitations/implications

Further research would be required to verify the welfare effects suggested on the theoretical ground.

Practical implications

The article makes a useful updating of food safety policies and organisational innovation in the food system.

Originality/value

The paper introduces some new (with respect to the marketing literature related to the food system) concepts and theories of economic sociology.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 110 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Sharifah Zannierah Syed Marzuki, Collin Michael Hall and Paul William Ballantine

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the attitudes of restaurant managers toward halal certification.

6288

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the attitudes of restaurant managers toward halal certification.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 33 interview sessions were conducted among restaurant managers in halal certified, halal claimant and non‐halal restaurants and the data were coordinated into common themes.

Findings

Restaurant managers feel that halal certification is very prevalent in the hospitality industry, as it promotes the importance of restaurant managers having knowledge of Muslims' dietary restrictions, sensitivity and religious practices; halal certification signifies that it has some attributes that make it unique and at the same time conforming to the Islamic dietary rules.

Originality/value

This study is very significant as this is the first paper to examine attitudes of restaurant managers in relation to halal certification in Malaysia. It is gathered that very few researches were performed in the hospitality industry pertaining to halal certification, although the demand for halal foods is growing.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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