Search results

1 – 10 of over 8000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 June 2021

Christos Konstantinidis, Stamatis Aggelopoulos, Maria Tsiouni and Evanthia Rizopoulou

The objective of this study is to estimate the competitiveness for both the Greek food and beverage industry as a whole and the flour and milling industry, justifying the…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this study is to estimate the competitiveness for both the Greek food and beverage industry as a whole and the flour and milling industry, justifying the certain economic factors and the way which these factors affect on it.

Design/methodology/approach

The Greek food and beverage firms which published their balance sheets for the studying period were studied. According to the existing literature two equations were created and estimated as a simultaneous equations system.

Findings

Summarizing the results both for the whole food and beverage industry and the flour milling industry are observed significant similarities on how certain economics factors such as profitability, market share, sustainable growth, age and operating costs affect on competitiveness as measured in this work. This may happen due to the high degree of concentration but also in the special characteristics which present both the Greek food and beverage industry and the flour milling sector.

Research limitations/implications

The fact that this work referred only in Greek firms can be a limitation of this research, in spite of that it can provide useful and safe conclusions for the Greek food manufacturing industry.

Practical implications

The provision of proposals for increasing firm competitiveness to managers as well as to policymakers.

Social implications

The importance of food and beverage industry for the Greek economy as well as that the flour milling industry holds an important position in the Greek food and beverage industry makes the study of the competitiveness for both of them to be important from both an academic and research perspective.

Originality/value

The Greek food and beverage industry is the strength of Greek manufacturing and at the same time an important lever for the development of the entire Greek economy. The high quality products it produces and the organized promotion of its products in international markets are elements that give it an advantage and stimulate its competitiveness. The flour milling industry is one of the sectors in which there is intense competition and whose presence in terms of sales, turnover, employment and gross value is particularly important, so a simultaneous study of these cases is very important.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Michelle Phillipov

The increasing frequency with which food and beverage producers feature in mainstream media, including television cooking shows, provide opportunities and pitfalls for…

Downloads
1390

Abstract

Purpose

The increasing frequency with which food and beverage producers feature in mainstream media, including television cooking shows, provide opportunities and pitfalls for using media to promote artisan food and beverage businesses. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate these, as experienced by a group of food and beverage producers who appeared on the popular Australian television show, Gourmet Farmer.

Design/methodology/approach

Findings are based on semi-structured interviews with 14 of the producers featured on the show, plus textual analysis of relevant segments of the show.

Findings

While all of the producers felt that food television offered a good promotional tool, those who were most familiar with the practices of media production and whose businesses offered experiences through which viewers could access (or imagine) a “taste” of the Gourmet Farmer life tended to be more satisfied than those who were less familiar with the practices of media production and who expected a greater focus on their products and production practices.

Practical implications

The development of media skills is essential for artisan producers to get the best outcomes when using media to promote their businesses.

Originality/value

The experiences of food and beverage producers using food television to promote their businesses have not previously been the subject of thoroughgoing research. This paper offers new insights into how artisan producers can best capitalize on the opportunities offered by food media.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 February 2021

Imran Ali and Mohamed Gamal Shehata Aboelmaged

Despite considerable growth in literature on Industry 4.0 technologies, the research on the factors influencing the investment on these technologies in pursuit of supply…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite considerable growth in literature on Industry 4.0 technologies, the research on the factors influencing the investment on these technologies in pursuit of supply chain 4.0 is yet incipient. The study aims to fill this knowledge void by exploring the perceived drivers and barriers intertwined in the implementation of supply chain 4.0 in the context of food and beverage industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative exploratory research was employed involving 20 semi-structured interviews with senior managers from the Australian food and beverage supply chain. The interviews' data were analysed with VOSViewer software version 1.6.14.

Findings

The results unravel that reduction in supply-demand misalignment, fast-changing consumer's needs, threat of legal penalties and cost optimisation are the key drivers; whereas lack of collaboration, organisational inertia and lack of awareness are the critical barriers to implement supply chain 4.0.

Research limitations/implications

The study derives seven propositions and a theoretical framework that need to be empirically corroborated.

Practical implications

Understanding of drivers and barriers will help practitioners to make more informed decision in implementation of supply chain 4.0.

Social implications

Implementation of supply chain 4.0 can enhance the performance of the food and beverage industry, thus offering more job opportunities and sustained food supply.

Originality/value

This is the first study in exploring drivers and barriers to the implementation of supply chain 4.0; thus, adds new knowledge to the growing body of the literature. The paper introduces a novel method for qualitative data analysis contributing to the methodological development of the supply chain management field.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Bilal Fayiz Omar and Nidal Omar Zallom

This study aims to investigate the relationship between different themes of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and companies’ market value (measured by Tobin Q) for…

Downloads
1748

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the relationship between different themes of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and companies’ market value (measured by Tobin Q) for Jordanian firms listed on the Amman Stock Exchange (ASE) for the period 2006-2010.

Design/methodology/approach

The annual reports of 26 companies on the ASE for the years 2006-2010 were selected for this study. Three industrial sectors were chosen: chemical; food and beverage; and pharmaceutical and medical (P&M). The CSR is measured by constructing an index consisting of four themes which are as follows: environmental 9 items; human resources 16 items; community 7 items; and products 7 items. The study adopts Tobin Q as the dependent variable to measure the market value of corporations. Two control variables were included in the regression analysis for their possible effects on the CSR and company’s market value relationship: size and leverage. This study performs a multiple regression analysis model to test the effect of the four CSR themes: environmental, human resources, community and products on the market value measured by Tobin Q.

Findings

The results revealed that environmental, community and product activities decreased market value in the food and beverage industry, while human resources activities had no effect on market value in the same industry. Moreover, the community theme was found to have a negative effect on market value in the P&M industry, while the three other themes were found to have no effect on market value in the same industry. The four themes had no effect on market value in the chemical industry.

Research limitations/implications

The current study has a number of limitations, which have implications for future research. First, the study focused only on three industrial sectors (chemical, food and beverage and P&M), which limited the results to only these industries. In addition, the CSR concept and its effect on profitability is an important issue for the financial and services sectors. Hence, it would be beneficial to investigate the CSR impact on profitability for the financial and services sectors. Moreover, the study focused only on one country, Jordan. An extension of this study could be a comparison of the CSR effect on financial performance between Jordan and other countries in the Middle East. Furthermore, the measurement of CSR is subject to criticism because it might generate bias according to subjective judgments about CSR items. The CSR items are equally weighted, which might not be acceptable because their nature and effect differ among industries. However, introducing qualitative measures for CSR that reflect various perspectives about CSR practices and implications is essential. Finally, the period chosen for this study includes the years of global financial crisis as well which had eroded the market value of many firms in different industries, and this may form a prominent limitation of this study.

Practical implications

The results of this study have given evidence of the role of CSR in Jordan. The investments in the CSR field could negatively affect or could have no effect on market value. Overall, regulators in Jordan should pay attention to the costs and benefits of CSR among companies. Companies will be encouraged to invest in CSR activities if the benefits on their financial performance exceed the costs (cost-benefit theory). Specifically, companies should select types of CSR activities that enhance their competiveness in the society.

Social implications

The results of this study provide practical implications to several users in the chemical, food and beverage and P&M industries. Managers, investors and other users may pay attention to the impact of CSR strategies on the company’s market value. For example, food and beverage managers may decrease their CSR investments around environmental, community and product activities because these decrease the market value and profitability of the company. However, the CSR investment in human resources does not affect the profitability in this industry. For the chemical industry, managers may not focus on CSR investments in the different activities (environmental, human resources, community and products) because these have no impact on the company’s market value. In regards to the P&M industry, managers may decrease their CSR investments around community activities because this decreases the market value. However, managers may not be concerned with CSR investments in environmental, human resources and products activities because these do not affect the company’s market value.

Originality/value

The relationship between CSR and a company’s financial performance has been tested broadly in the financial and management fields without any conclusive results. Some explanations for the inconclusive results are discussed. Inoue and Lee (2011, p. 791) noted three main issues that remain unresolved in the studies regarding the relationship between CSR and a company’s performance: using samples for different industries, using cross sectional observations and using aggregate CSR dimensions. The current study overcomes the main problems in the previous discussion. In particular, the study will focus on specific industries (chemical, food and beverage and P&M). In addition, the study will use multidimensional CSR measures. Moreover, financial performance will be measured by a single measure (market value) instead of using different measures of financial performance.

Details

Journal of Financial Reporting and Accounting, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-2517

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Doris Miculan Bradley, Tony Elenis, Gary Hoyer, David Martin and James Waller

Challenged by a clear shortfall of available employees to be long-term members of the food service industry, this paper aims to establish reasons for the shortage of…

Downloads
1211

Abstract

Purpose

Challenged by a clear shortfall of available employees to be long-term members of the food service industry, this paper aims to establish reasons for the shortage of available employees and curate a number of strategies to improve the situation.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on the perspectives of many industry stakeholders. These professionals collaborated to identify a number of contributing factors to the shortage of employees in the Canadian food and beverage industry. Corresponding solutions were assessed, prioritized and categorized by groups responsible for taking action.

Findings

There are many strategies that can be implemented in both the short and long term that can increase the draw for potential employees to join this industry.

Practical implications

Industry members, educators and government policymakers can all play a role in improving the worker shortage in the food service industry. The recommendations range from industry collaboration to redefinition of jobs and to redistribution of wages.

Originality/value

The co-authors of this paper include the President and CEO of Ontario Restaurant, Hotel and Motel Association and educators with strong industry experiences gained in the positions of food and beverage director, restaurant manager and executive chef. Given the diverse experiences of the author team, this paper creates a more holistic view of the recommendations to consider for this industry to see positive change.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 27 November 2020

I. I. Okwuosa

This paper explores environmental accountability and downward accountability role of nongovernmental organisations (henceforth NGOs) under Extended Producer Responsibility…

Abstract

This paper explores environmental accountability and downward accountability role of nongovernmental organisations (henceforth NGOs) under Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) in the food and beverage industry of Nigeria. The paper relies on empirical data gathered from qualitative interviews of three stakeholders – accountants, Corporate Social Responsibility Officers (CSROs), CEOs and NGO CSROs. It employed theoretical conceptualisation of environmental accountability and NGO's downward accountability. Analysis shows that despite the existence of attributes of environmental accountability such as sense of responsibility on the part of corporations and citizens' rights to demand for and enforce accountability, passivity of citizens' right caused by vulnerability prevails. The finding also shows that downward accountability roles of NGOs in the industry have been framed as that of enhancing activities in the value chain. Part of this is RecyclePay project that funds education for the poor. Thus NGOs' downward (environmental) accountability in Nigeria has potential to promote environmental well-being, beneficiary's economic empowerment and education for the poor, thereby simultaneously addressing vulnerability. It shows that vulnerability may induce a different conceptualisation of environmental accountability than that of a normal democratic setting where the citizens are deemed to have right to demand and enforce (environmental) accountability. This paper contributes to our understanding of (environmental) accountability and downward accountability role of NGOs within an emerging market context.

Details

Environmentalism and NGO Accountability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-002-8

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Nipa Saha

This paper aims to outline the historic development of advertising regulation that governs food advertising to children in Australia. Through reviewing primary and

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to outline the historic development of advertising regulation that governs food advertising to children in Australia. Through reviewing primary and secondary literature, such as government reports and research, this paper examines the influence of various regulatory policies that limit children’s exposure to food and beverage marketing on practices across television (TV), branded websites and Facebook pages.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews studies performed by the food industry and public health researchers and reviews of the evidence by government and non-government agencies from the early 19th century until the present day. Also included are several other research studies that evaluate the effects of self-regulation on Australian TV food advertising.

Findings

The government, public health and the food industry have attempted to respond to the rapid changes within the advertising, marketing and media industries by developing and reviewing advertising codes. However, self-regulation is failing to protect Australian children from exposure to unhealthy food advertising.

Practical implications

The findings could aid the food and beverage industry, and the self-regulatory system, to promote comprehensive and achievable solutions to the growing obesity rates in Australia by introducing new standards that keep pace with expanded forms of marketing communication.

Originality/value

This study adds to the research on the history of regulation of food advertising to children in Australia by offering insights into the government, public health and food industry’s attempts to respond to the rapid changes within the advertising, marketing and media industries by developing and reviewing advertising codes.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Maman Setiawan and Alfons G.J.M. Oude Lansink

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relation between industrial concentration and technical inefficiency in the Indonesian food and beverages industry using a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relation between industrial concentration and technical inefficiency in the Indonesian food and beverages industry using a dynamic performance measure (dynamic technical inefficiency) that accounts for the presence of adjustment costs.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses panel data of 44 subsectors in the Indonesian food and beverages industry for the period 1980-2014. The dynamic input directional distance function is applied to estimate the dynamic technical inefficiency. Further, the Granger causality between industrial concentration and dynamic technical inefficiency is tested using a dynamic panel data model. A bootstrap truncated regression model is finally applied to estimate the relation between industrial concentration and dynamic technical inefficiency based on the results from the Granger causality test.

Findings

The results show that the Indonesian food and beverages industry has a high dynamic technical inefficiency. Investigation of the causality of the relation shows that industrial concentration has a positive effect on dynamic technical inefficiency at the subsector level, with no reversed causality. The results suggest that the quiet life hypothesis applies to the Indonesian food and beverages industry.

Originality/value

The literature investigating the relation between industrial concentration and performance relies on static measures of performance, such as technical efficiency. Static measures provide an incorrect metric of the firms’ performance in the presence of adjustment costs associated with investment. Therefore, this research has a contribution in measuring dynamic technical inefficiency that accounts for the presence of the adjustment cost as well as its relation with industrial concentration in the Indonesian food and beverages industry.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Charles J. Cante, Vincent J. Calluzzo, Deborah P. Schwartz and Theodore M. Schwartz

Strategic alliances, one component of a total quality management program, break down linkages of a supply chain and help alliance partners to address new markets that…

Downloads
5385

Abstract

Strategic alliances, one component of a total quality management program, break down linkages of a supply chain and help alliance partners to address new markets that could not be economically satisfied by a single firm. In recent years, through numerous press releases and anecdotal references, there have been an increased number of reported strategic alliances. However, there have been no systematic studies of the prevalence and impact of strategic alliances in specific industries and no way to obtain information on the costs and benefits of these formal relationships. This current research addresses these gaps. As part of a long‐term longitudinal research program covering diverse industries, two different industries, one in products (food and beverages) and the other in services (executive recruiting) were studied to determine the extent of penetration and effectiveness of strategic alliances. This paper presents examples of strategic alliances and the survey results describing penetration, types of alliances, business benefits, and expected costs.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 July 2010

Richard Carew and Wojciech J. Florkowski

This paper aims to examine the contribution of physical capital, skilled labor, research and development (R&D), and imports to the productivity of ten Canadian food and

Downloads
1252

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the contribution of physical capital, skilled labor, research and development (R&D), and imports to the productivity of ten Canadian food and beverage manufacturing sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

A Cobb‐Douglas production function is estimated to discern the relative contribution of physical versus R&D knowledge capital in fostering productivity growth. The paper uses a balanced panel dataset and is based on pooled cross‐sectional time series data for ten food and beverage manufacturing industries over the period 1994‐2005. The methodological framework adopted in this paper is a cross‐sectionally correlated and time‐wise autoregressive model. Data employed in this paper are from Statistics Canada's annual survey of manufacturing industries and Canadian Socio‐economic Information Management computerized database.

Findings

The results show that food manufacturing productivity for ten food and beverage sectors is more responsive to physical capital than R&D knowledge capital. Some of the other determinants of labor productivity in food manufacturing included the contribution from university‐educated workers.

Originality/value

The paper is useful to both policy makers and academics in the research fields of R&D and productivity. It provides some interesting insights into the contribution of physical and knowledge capital to food manufacturing industry productivity.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 112 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 8000