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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Michelle Phillipov

The increasing frequency with which food and beverage producers feature in mainstream media, including television cooking shows, provide opportunities and pitfalls for…

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Abstract

Purpose

The increasing frequency with which food and beverage producers feature in mainstream media, including television cooking shows, provide opportunities and pitfalls for using media to promote artisan food and beverage businesses. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate these, as experienced by a group of food and beverage producers who appeared on the popular Australian television show, Gourmet Farmer.

Design/methodology/approach

Findings are based on semi-structured interviews with 14 of the producers featured on the show, plus textual analysis of relevant segments of the show.

Findings

While all of the producers felt that food television offered a good promotional tool, those who were most familiar with the practices of media production and whose businesses offered experiences through which viewers could access (or imagine) a “taste” of the Gourmet Farmer life tended to be more satisfied than those who were less familiar with the practices of media production and who expected a greater focus on their products and production practices.

Practical implications

The development of media skills is essential for artisan producers to get the best outcomes when using media to promote their businesses.

Originality/value

The experiences of food and beverage producers using food television to promote their businesses have not previously been the subject of thoroughgoing research. This paper offers new insights into how artisan producers can best capitalize on the opportunities offered by food media.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2021

Thamaraiselvan Natarajan and G. R. Jayadevan

This conceptual paper aims to study the Corona Virus Disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic’s impact on branded functional beverages consumption in India. There is a sincere…

Abstract

Purpose

This conceptual paper aims to study the Corona Virus Disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic’s impact on branded functional beverages consumption in India. There is a sincere effort to critically review the role of some vital determinants of consumer behaviour and to develop an integrated model for branded functional beverages consumption behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic and extensive literature review was performed by searching electronic databases relating to consumer acceptance and purchase behaviour of functional beverages in India from 2000 to 2021. This study also reviewed very recent literature on the potential impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on global consumer traits, buying behaviour, marketing trends and psychographic behaviour.

Findings

The extensive review of the literature yielded results that shed light on some crucial factors propelling branded functional beverages’ consumption behaviour in India, especially in the COVID-19 scenario.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based purely on a conceptual understanding of branded functional beverages’ consumption behaviour among Indian consumers. The conceptual framework proposed here results from the review of past literature. Therefore, the scientific world is invigorated to test further the implications presented in this study empirically.

Practical implications

The conceptual framework proposed here concerning consumer behaviour in functional beverages would guide the food marketers to segment and position their functional food offerings, mainly beverage variants, in the post-pandemic scenario. Moreover, the study findings enable policymakers to craft food policies to uphold the noble cause of moulding a healthy generation.

Originality/value

The COVID-19 pandemic has virtually shattered our food system and modified our associations with food in many different ways. The perception of health risks associated with COVID-19 might have influenced people’s food purchase and consumption behaviours. It is proposed that health-conscious people would prefer more health-promoting foods and beverages to strengthen their immunity. Several reports disclose that food consumers in India demand functional foods and beverages more extensively than before to include in their daily food basket. A detailed literature review revealed an evident shortage of research studies regarding consumer behaviour in functional beverages in India. No prior research works could be identified as to why consumers prefer functional beverages to benefit their overall health and immunity and what guides them to purchase or not to purchase such products, especially in the post-pandemic scenario. Therefore, this research work would be a primer that would guide future studies investigating consumers’ attitudes and purchasing behaviour of branded functional beverages.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Douglas Sorenson and Joe Bogue

The objective of this study is to identify the optimal product design attributes for a range of chilled probiotic orange juice beverages, and to evaluate the contribution…

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Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this study is to identify the optimal product design attributes for a range of chilled probiotic orange juice beverages, and to evaluate the contribution of market‐oriented research methodologies to the development and strategic marketing of innovative functional beverages.

Design/methodology/approach

A conjoint‐based survey was administered to 400 purchasers of chilled orange juice in both Dublin and Cork between May and September 2004.

Findings

New product development (NPD) opportunities exist for probiotic juice‐based beverages, although functionality should not be relied on solely to leverage a competitive advantage.

Research limitations/implications

The survey sample only included primary purchasers of chilled orange juice, owing to the increased importance of the chilled orange juice category in Ireland. Further research that would incorporate purchasers of ambient orange juice, and end‐users of both chilled and ambient orange juice in Ireland, as well as across European states for a cross‐cultural perspective, would prove beneficial to both manufacturers and retailers.

Practical implications

Advanced market‐oriented research methodologies during the concept stage of the NPD process can assist both food and beverage firms and retailers to develop and market functional foods and beverages that more closely meet consumers' needs and values.

Originality/value

This research can assist beverage manufacturers to optimally design a range of chilled probiotic orange juice beverages targeted at specific market segments, and provide guidance for effective positioning, communication and pricing strategies of innovative functional beverages.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 107 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Nipa Saha

This paper aims to outline the historic development of advertising regulation that governs food advertising to children in Australia. Through reviewing primary and

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to outline the historic development of advertising regulation that governs food advertising to children in Australia. Through reviewing primary and secondary literature, such as government reports and research, this paper examines the influence of various regulatory policies that limit children’s exposure to food and beverage marketing on practices across television (TV), branded websites and Facebook pages.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews studies performed by the food industry and public health researchers and reviews of the evidence by government and non-government agencies from the early 19th century until the present day. Also included are several other research studies that evaluate the effects of self-regulation on Australian TV food advertising.

Findings

The government, public health and the food industry have attempted to respond to the rapid changes within the advertising, marketing and media industries by developing and reviewing advertising codes. However, self-regulation is failing to protect Australian children from exposure to unhealthy food advertising.

Practical implications

The findings could aid the food and beverage industry, and the self-regulatory system, to promote comprehensive and achievable solutions to the growing obesity rates in Australia by introducing new standards that keep pace with expanded forms of marketing communication.

Originality/value

This study adds to the research on the history of regulation of food advertising to children in Australia by offering insights into the government, public health and food industry’s attempts to respond to the rapid changes within the advertising, marketing and media industries by developing and reviewing advertising codes.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Nicole Cockburn, Lisa Schubert, Nam-Phuong Quoc Nguyen and Pauline Ford

Australian sales of hyperpalatable beverages (HPB) (a term used to describe naturally or artificially sweet beverages) have followed a consistent upward trend since 2000…

Abstract

Purpose

Australian sales of hyperpalatable beverages (HPB) (a term used to describe naturally or artificially sweet beverages) have followed a consistent upward trend since 2000. The purpose of this paper is to examine HPB brand placements in the top 20 annual highest grossing movies in Australia in 2010-2014.

Design/methodology/approach

A content analysis was undertaken on the 20 highest grossing movies annually from 2010 to 2014. Movies were analysed according to the prevalence and portrayal of branded beverages.

Findings

In total, 35 per cent of movies contained an HPB brand placement. Movies were more likely to be classified M, MA15+, R/R18+, and categorised as comedy, or action/adventure genre. Soft drinks were the most prevalent category (60.9 per cent), and Coca Cola Company manufactured 40.6 per cent of the brands that were embedded throughout the movies.

Originality/value

This study revealed some of industry’s non-direct marketing strategies through HPB placement in movies. Findings suggest that further scrutiny is needed of the relatively underresearched medium of beverage advertising.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2018

Charlene Elliott

This paper aims to examine current regulatory initiatives on food marketing to young people and to highlight unique considerations when it comes to teenagers.

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1634

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine current regulatory initiatives on food marketing to young people and to highlight unique considerations when it comes to teenagers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper integrates the policy and public health literature with the literature on childhood studies and consumer studies.

Findings

Since the policy goal is to mitigate the impact of food marketing on young people’s attitudes and behaviours, it is necessary to recognize the consumer competencies of teenagers and consider the social and symbolic meanings of food for them. It is suggested that radical media literacy, coupled with food literacy, is essential to navigating a complex food environment filled with promotional messages for ultra-processed foods.

Research limitations/implications

This analysis has implications for policy development.

Practical implications

Consideration of age – in terms of different developmental competencies, motivating factors and additional initiatives to support healthy eating (such as teaching media literacy skills) – is necessary to policy development related to food marketing to children.

Originality/value

Little research integrates the literature on food policy/regulation with the critical work on consumer studies/childhood studies. This commentary also directs attention to novel areas of consideration related to teenagers and food marketing.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Case study
Publication date: 1 January 2011

Angela Poech, Tom C. Peisl and Tina Lorenz

Ethical Entrepreneurship; Internationalization of small and medium enterprises (SMEs).

Abstract

Subject area

Ethical Entrepreneurship; Internationalization of small and medium enterprises (SMEs).

Study level/applicability

Bachelor and Master courses in International Management and Entrepreneurship.

Case overview

A German medical scientist developed a product which was able to absorb alcohol in blood and consequently reduced the alcohol-level. He tested it with the participation of 170 volunteers at a private party. The product was consumed after alcohol consumption and the result was an alcohol reduction by 20-70 per cent. In addition, the volunteers had either no or only small symptoms of a hangover. The students shall discuss the different business models the medical scientist could implement by taking into account ethical issues. To give them necessary working data, the case includes European environmental data (including information about the European food industry and the functional drink market), an insight into the European legal issues of starting a business in the food segment (including definitions of “food”, “food supplement” and “health claim regulation” and how these factors impact entrepreneurial decisions), current events in the European food branch and examples of possible competitors. The case is built on a real product development and on current information and facts.

Expected learning outcomes

To become involved with entrepreneurial thinking and entrepreneurial decision-making. To debate ethical issues in the entrepreneurial process. To become aware of the complexity of internationalization in the field of SME as well as to reflect upon and sketch appropriate strategies.

Supplementary materials

Teaching note.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Ibrahim Giritlioglu, Eleri Jones and Cevdet Avcikurt

The aim of this study was three-fold: first, to develop an instrument to evaluate food and beverage service quality in spa hotels; second, to identify aspects of food and

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10473

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was three-fold: first, to develop an instrument to evaluate food and beverage service quality in spa hotels; second, to identify aspects of food and beverage service quality of which customers had the highest expectations, i.e. the key dimensions of food and beverage service quality in spa hotels; third, to measure customer perceptions of the spa hotels in this study and to identify those dimensions with the largest gap between customer expectations and perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-administrated questionnaire was distributed to 331 customers at four different spa hotels in Balikesir, Turkey. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis was used to identify service quality dimensions. Cronbach Alpha indicated the reliability of the factors identified. Customer expectations, perceptions and gaps between expectations and perceptions for each dimension were measured.

Findings

Factor analysis revealed six quality dimensions: “assurance and employee knowledge”; “healthy and attractive food”; “empathy”; “tangibles”; “responsiveness of service delivery”; “reliability”. Customer expectations were highest for “tangibles” and “assurance and employee knowledge”. The largest gaps between perceptions and expectations were for “healthy and attractive foodand “tangibles”.

Practical implications

Key dimensions for food and beverage service quality in spa hotels were identified and a reliable instrument for measuring provision was developed. This should be applied by managers on an ongoing basis to evaluate their performance and give them a better understanding of food and beverage service quality in spa hotels. The study provides specific information on the performance of Turkish spa hotels in relation to food and beverage service quality.

Originality/value

This research addresses the paucity of research on customer perspectives of food and beverage provision in spa hotels and contributes to enhanced understanding of spa tourists and their expectations and perceptions of the service quality of food and beverage service quality.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Jessica Castonguay

Childhood obesity is a serious health concern (World Health Organization (WHO), 2013) and advertising exposure is known to be a contributing factor (Institute of Medicine…

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1599

Abstract

Purpose

Childhood obesity is a serious health concern (World Health Organization (WHO), 2013) and advertising exposure is known to be a contributing factor (Institute of Medicine (IOM), 2006). In recent years consumers have expressed an increased interest in products appearing healthy and food companies have committed to changing their child-targeted marketing practices to promote a healthy lifestyle. The purpose of this paper is to examine depictions of physical activity in food advertising and assess how recognition of a promoted food’s healthy and unhealthy traits influences dietary selections among youth in Southern Arizona in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

A content analysis of food advertisements aired during 2009-2013 (n=534 and 354, respectively) identified changes to child-targeted food marketing messages. A structured interview determined differences in recognition of “juxtaposed beliefs” (i.e. that are contradictory and both healthy and unhealthy e.g. connecting exercise with a food high in sugar) among younger children, five to six years of age (n=34) and older children, ten to 11 years of age (n=34). Children were offered snacks to determine how this ability to recognize juxtaposition related to their dietary selections.

Findings

There has been an increase in the frequency with which physical activity is depicted in advertisements for high-sugar foods. When presented with such advertising, a greater number of older than younger children recognized juxtaposed beliefs. Those younger children who showed recognition were more likely to select the advertised item, although this was not the case with older children.

Research limitations/implications

The findings from this research relate to children’s responses to advertisements for sugared cereal that depict physical activity and may not be generalizable further.

Practical implications

Children who are able to recognize both the healthy and unhealthy aspects of food are paradoxically likely to find it more appealing. Given the increased practice of associating high-sugar foods with physical activity in child-targeted food marketing, this raises concerns for nutrition education strategies, and the regulation of food marketing to children.

Originality/value

Little research has examined the depiction of physical activity in food marketing targeting children, nor children’s ability to recognize, and react to, juxtaposed beliefs regarding a product’s healthfulness.

Details

Health Education, vol. 115 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2020

Zhanna Belyaeva, Edyta Dorota Rudawska and Yana Lopatkova

The presented study pinpoints transformation of business models of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in the food and beverage sector depending on their sustainability…

Abstract

Purpose

The presented study pinpoints transformation of business models of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in the food and beverage sector depending on their sustainability strategy. This paper makes a novel contribution to understanding various instruments of sustainability implementation in SMEs’ business models operating in the food and beverage industry of well-developed Western European countries versus less-developed Central–Eastern European countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical basis is a survey of 770 European SMEs, of which 369 operate in Western European countries (including Great Britain, Germany and Spain) and 401 in Central and Eastern Europe (including Poland, Croatia and Russia). The nonparametric U Mann–Whitney test was used to examine the significance of the differences between the two groups of companies.

Findings

The study empirically confirmed that despite self-declared lack of skills and knowledge in managerial impacts of sustainability, it shapes business models of SME in both country groups in food and drink industry. At the same time, the motivation grounds for business models transformation toward sustainable models vary between mostly economic factors in Eastern Europe and social and cultural factors in Western Europe. The economic factor is formed due to smaller integration into social investments at the SME-level Eastern European countries, while Western European SMEs invest more in a variety of sustainability supporting instruments (R&D, new equipment).

Originality/value

This comparative study is the novel empirical research study on the implementation of sustainability into business models of food and beverage SMEs operating in two groups of Western and Central–Eastern European countries, which has not been previously observed in such a setting.

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