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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2022

Hatice Merve Bayram and Arda Ozturkcan

This study aims to determine what consumers take into consideration while buying food and to increase awareness. We also demonstrated food additives knowledge, and the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to determine what consumers take into consideration while buying food and to increase awareness. We also demonstrated food additives knowledge, and the association between food additive consumption and illness.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was used to collect data from respondents (n = 433).

Findings

Gender and knowledge of food additives and E numbers were found to be statistically different, as were education status and knowledge of food additives (p < 0.05). When purchasing foods, 40.0% of the respondents seldom read labels and also 34.9% were reading for each buy who verified the product’s expiration date (94.2%), followed by brand name (84.8%). Sucralose, Acesulfame potassium (Ace-K) and aspartame consumption were associated with type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Additionally, sulfite consumption was linked to diarrhea/constipation.

Research limitations/implications

This study has some limitations. First, the study was cross-sectional, which does not allow the establishment of causal relationships for the associations found here. Second, the study was limited to one city in Turkey. Therefore, the study's findings cannot be extrapolated to Turkey.

Practical implications

Nutrition education should be given by the experts, and the policies should be implemented so that food labels may be used more effectively. Furthermore, nutritional education and policies can increase the general public's awareness of food additives.

Social implications

Nutrition education should be given by the experts, and the policies should be implemented so that food labels may be used more effectively. Furthermore, nutritional education and policies can increase the general public's awareness of food additives.

Originality/value

Consumers must be knowledgeable about food additives and E numbers. However, the findings revealed that the majority of Turkish consumers seldom read product labels, and the use of several food additives resulted in negative health repercussions. Therefore, professionals should provide nutrition education, and legislation should be put in place so that food labels may be used more effectively.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 March 2020

Amir Reza Moravejolahkami, Zahra Esfandiari, Hadiseh Ebdali, Marjan Ganjali Dashti, Akbar Hassanzadeh, Hasan Ziaei and Nimah Bahreini Esfahani

Understanding consumers’ food safety practices are helpful in reducing foodborne illnesses. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the influence of education on…

Abstract

Purpose

Understanding consumers’ food safety practices are helpful in reducing foodborne illnesses. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the influence of education on knowledge, attitude and practices toward food additives.

Design/methodology/approach

This interventional study was performed by random sampling of 826 employees in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences from January 2018 to March 2019. The knowledge, attitude and practices of the employees toward food additives were assessed by a self-administered and structured questionnaire. Two-month education was conducted visually by using pamphlets, posters and leaflets. Descriptive statistics and paired t-test were done by SPSS24 at significant levels of p < 0.05.

Findings

The results showed that the respondents were very concerned about preservatives, colorants, and artificial sweeteners in foods. Before the education, the percentages collected for the knowledge, attitude and practice were 79.0, 48.9 and 46.7, respectively. Overall, knowledge scores were improved from 79.0 to 88.9 per cent when the education was offered. Safety attitude scores significantly increased, with a 50 per cent difference between the pre and post values. A significant difference was observed in the percentage of knowledge, attitude and practice of the employers before and after education (p < 0.05). Almost half of the respondents chose leaflets and pamphlets as a preferable tool for learning.

Originality/value

Education may be needed for improving knowledge and attitude about food additives. It also helped the respondents to select healthier food. This study suggests more communication programs regarding food safety issues.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 50 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Dhamawatee Harnarun Etwaroo, Dayawatee Goburdhun and Arvind Ruggoo

Food additives are a group of substances added deliberately to foods to improve their organoleptic properties and stability, extend their shelf life and retain their…

Abstract

Purpose

Food additives are a group of substances added deliberately to foods to improve their organoleptic properties and stability, extend their shelf life and retain their nutritional value. The purpose of this paper is to identify the most frequently used classes of food additives and the food categories which contain the highest number of classes of additives.

Design/methodology/approach

A market survey was carried out in hypermarkets and shops where the original labels of 629 food products (195 local and 434 imported) were examined for presence of food additives. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to explore the association between food category and classes of additives, and a χ2 test was performed to establish any association between product origin and the number of classes of food additives.

Findings

In sum, 75 per cent of food samples surveyed contained at least one class of food additive. The food categories which contained the highest number of classes of food additives across the group were: snacks (12 classes), biscuits and cakes (11 classes), fish products (11 classes) and soft drinks (10 classes). The most common classes of additive used were acidity regulator, colour and preservative. χ2 test revealed a significant association (χ2 = 8.28, p < 0.05) between the origin and number of classes of food additives, and the PCA showed that biscuits were associated with raising agent, candies and snacks with colour, fruit drinks and soft drinks with acidity regulator, mayonnaise with thickener and meat products with preservative.

Research limitations/implications

The food products were sourced only from retailers selling labelled food products.

Originality/value

This novel study provides a basis for determining compliance of food products to the National Food Regulations.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 November 2012

Preeti Singh, Sven Saengerlaub, Ali Abas Wani and Horst‐Christian Langowski

The purpose of this paper is to review the new trends in plastic additives, with special focus on developments in food packaging materials.

2185

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the new trends in plastic additives, with special focus on developments in food packaging materials.

Design/methodology/approach

Phenomenological research has brought awareness and increased insight into the role of various plastic additives on the packaging of foods. The approach is based on the current trends and the industrial protocols for the additives used in plastic polymer processing for the development of food packaging materials.

Findings

Packaging of foodstuffs is a dynamic process which continually responds to the changes in supply and demand which are the result of adaptations to the varying demands of the consumer, changes in retail practices, technological innovations, new materials and developments in legislation, especially, with respect to environmental concerns. A wide range of additives is available for enhancing the performance and appearance of food packaging, as well as improving the processing of the compound. Polymer additives are important areas of innovation for packaging materials.

Originality/value

The paper reviews and summarizes the recent developments in the functionality of different additives, along with their advantages and disadvantages, currently being used to enhance the properties of food packaging materials that can positively influence the environment within the packaging for the increased demand for raw or processed foods.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Bibi Nadia Shaheen Koyratty, Badroonesha Aumjaud and Shalini Amnee Neeliah

The aim of this paper is to explore consumer knowledge, attitudes and practices relating to food additives and to investigate manufacturers' attitudes and practices…

1687

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to explore consumer knowledge, attitudes and practices relating to food additives and to investigate manufacturers' attitudes and practices pertaining to food additives and their control.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaire administered face-to-face interviews were conducted with 180 consumers from the population working at the University of Mauritius while an interview guide was used for in-depth interviews with 12 manufacturers.

Findings

The results showed that 65 per cent of all respondents never checked food labels for additives. Overall, the respondents had poor knowledge on food additives. A significant relationship was established between level of education and knowledge rating based on percentage correct answers to food additive questions (p<0.05). The mean percentage correct answers for consumers with different educational levels increased in the following order: primary education; secondary education; tertiary education (p<0.05). The responses relating to attitudinal statements reflected indecision and certain misconceptions. In-depth interviews with local food manufacturers revealed positive attitudes and practices towards food additives. Several problems relating to additive control were mentioned, such as outdated regulations and weak enforcement.

Research limitations/implications

Given the sample sizes, the consumer research should not be extrapolated to the Mauritian population while the exploratory manufacturer study should not be generalised to the whole food industry.

Originality/value

These findings provide a factual basis for further investigations, review of current food legislation and development of education strategies for consumers, all aiming towards enhancing the effectiveness of the national food control system in Mauritius.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2009

Tobias Stern, Rainer Haas and Oliver Meixner

The aim of this paper is to investigate consumer attitudes to, and acceptance of, affective communication in the context of pre‐knowledge regarding wood‐based food additives.

1441

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate consumer attitudes to, and acceptance of, affective communication in the context of pre‐knowledge regarding wood‐based food additives.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 263 Austrian consumers was carried out to investigate pre‐knowledge, attitude and attitude change as a result of affective communication about wood‐based food additives.

Findings

About 14 per cent of the sample had pre‐knowledge concerning wood‐based food additives. In general the attitudes towards wood‐based additives were significantly better than those towards food additives in general. The results indicate a connection between pre‐knowledge and attitude. Respondents who had knowledge about wood‐based food additives evaluated them better, especially in contrast to those who had wrong ideas about them. Furthermore, it proved possible to improve the evaluations of those respondents who did not know about wood‐based additives by providing basic information.

Practical implications

The provision of additional information would improve the marketing potential of wood‐based additives, especially in contrast to additives in general. If the topic is ignored, there is a risk that public discussion could be based on non‐knowledge‐based conceptions by some consumers. The provision of early impact information is suggested in this regard.

Originality/value

Although the use of wood as a raw material in the food industry is common, it has not been a subject of public or scientific discussion to date.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 111 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1997

Margareta Wandel

Posits that food labelling is one medium by which consumers can acquire knowledge about the food they consider buying. This type of information is becoming increasingly…

6426

Abstract

Posits that food labelling is one medium by which consumers can acquire knowledge about the food they consider buying. This type of information is becoming increasingly important in a food market where direct contact with the personnel over the counter is declining. Reports the results from a pilot study and a consumer survey including 1050 respondents. Reveals that the majority of consumers read the food labels (often, sometimes or seldom), and that the reading frequency was associated with the degree of uncertainty about the food supply. Additives occupied a far more prominent place in these reading activities, than what could be expected from the respondents’ general notions of what constitutes a healthy diet. Discusses these results with regard to consumer apprehension of the presentation of data on the food labels.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 99 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 May 2007

Wajih Sawaya, Adnan Husain, Fawzia Al‐Awadhi, Nawal Al‐Hamad, Basma Dashti, Jameela Al‐Saqger and Basma Dashti

The purpose of this paper is to assess the consumption patterns of artificially coloured foods among children in Kuwait. A 24‐h dietary recall field survey was conducted…

844

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the consumption patterns of artificially coloured foods among children in Kuwait. A 24‐h dietary recall field survey was conducted on 3,141 male and female children from 58 schools in Kuwait to determine colour additive levels in food products marketed in Kuwait, and to assess and compare intake levels to FAO/WHO acceptable daily intakes.

Design/methodology/approach

Of 450 coloured foods available in the market, 344 that were commonly consumed by children were purchased from different co‐operative societies and supermarkets distributed in Kuwait and were grouped into nine categories, namely: biscuits, cake, candy, chips, chocolate, drinks and juices, chewing gum, jelly, and lollypops. These were then analysed for their contents of artificial colour additives using a high‐pressure liquid chromatography with diode array detector.

Findings

Data obtained from the field survey showed that “drinks and juices” contributed the most to the mean daily intake, followed by “cakes and ice cream”.

Originality/value

The similarity in the high daily intake of drinks among children in Kuwait and other countries indicates a need to improve the diets of Kuwaiti children.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1987

The use of food additives in the United Kingdom is controlled by the Food Act, and for most classes of additives, only those which appear on lists of regulations made…

Abstract

The use of food additives in the United Kingdom is controlled by the Food Act, and for most classes of additives, only those which appear on lists of regulations made under the Act can be added to food. The process of applying for new additives is outlined, and the principles evolved by the Food Advisory Committee (FAC) for the permittance of additives are given. Factors considered by them when assessing the need for a particular additive are listed, with a brief note on recommendations for labelling.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 89 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1985

Jane Wonnacott

The use of chemical substances as food additives is a topic which concerns many people. Jane Wonnacott MSc explains how the use of food additives is controlled and the…

Abstract

The use of chemical substances as food additives is a topic which concerns many people. Jane Wonnacott MSc explains how the use of food additives is controlled and the organisations who are involved in making sure that food in the UK and EEC continues to be safe and wholesome.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 85 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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