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Article
Publication date: 31 January 2020

Wided Batat and Paula Peter

The purpose of this paper introduces entomophagy as an alternative food consumption (AFC) capable of contributing to food well-being (FWB) among Western consumers…

1715

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper introduces entomophagy as an alternative food consumption (AFC) capable of contributing to food well-being (FWB) among Western consumers. Specifically, it provides a conceptual framework where key factors related to the acceptance and adoption of insects and insects based foods are identified. This paper takes a sociocultural, symbolic and contextual perspective to offer marketers and public policymakers a set of recommendations to promote entomophagy as a sustainable and healthy food practice to help consumers achieve their FWB.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, first, the authors review the literature on entomophagy from its rise to establishment in different food cultures by considering two main perspectives as follows: historical and sociocultural. Second, the authors review the salience of entomophagy as an important AFC capable of addressing sustainability and food health issues. Finally, the authors propose a framework in which the authors define key factors related to the acceptance and adoption of an insects-based diet in Western food cultures. The identification of these factors will help marketing and public policymakers to set up educational programs and strategies to promote entomophagy as a sustainable and healthy food practice within different Western food cultures, and thus, help consumers to achieve their FWB.

Findings

To identify the key factors influencing the acceptance of entomophagy as AFC, this paper provides a summary of the core motivators characterizing the acceptance and adoption of insects and insect-based foods in Western food cultures. Specifically, the authors identify the key factors influencing the acceptance of entomophagy as food consumption in Western food cultures and based on the extant literature by Batat et al. (2017) the authors provide an entomophagy framework that includes both idiocentric and allocentric factors considering the adoption of insects and insect-based foods in Western food cultures. Table I provides a summary.

Social implications

The authors believe entomophagy has the potential to generate societal benefits, as its appeal at the social (hunger in the world), environmental (reducing meat consumption and its impact on ecology) and health (less calories and nutritive food) level.

Originality/value

The research contributes to creating new knowledge that simulates debate among public policy and marketing scholars about entomophagy as a novel food in Western food cultures. The focus on key factors related to its acceptance and adoption of Western food cultures calls for empirical evidence to be tested in the marketplace using possibly different insect categories and other novel foods. Further, the framework should stimulate thinking about ways the authors can change consumers’ negative perceptions of disgusting food. Marketers and policymakers can achieve it by making their practices more efficient in terms of promoting sustainable AFC, as well as with efficient policy initiatives focused on supporting AFC, including the regulation of insect introduction.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

S. Shamal and Bijuna C. Mohan

The purpose of the conceptual paper was to identify diverse factors that had an impact on the purchase decision of fortified foods and beverages (FFB), and the specific…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the conceptual paper was to identify diverse factors that had an impact on the purchase decision of fortified foods and beverages (FFB), and the specific aim was to critically review the role of consumer health consciousness and the labelling aspects of the acceptance of FFB.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was based on a systematic and extensive review of literature, which had been carried out by searching electronic databases focusing on the different factors influencing consumer acceptance of health foods from the year 1975 to 2016.

Findings

Based on the extensive review of literature, the study identified important factors that had influenced the consumer acceptance of FFB. Further, the study has proposed an integrated FFB acceptance model for the Indian health food market.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed conceptual model of consumer acceptance of FFB needs to be empirically tested. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to test the proposed propositions further.

Practical implications

The proposed consumer acceptance model can act as a guideline to the marketers to segment and position their food products successfully. Moreover, the study will also help the health policymakers to form and execute the required policies to augment the public health.

Originality/value

Given that there was a lack of information about buyers and non-buyers of functional/FFB in India, the research study can be taken as a starting point upon which other studies that investigate the attitudes and the purchasing behaviour of consumers of FFB can be built.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Marina Cabral Rebouças, Maria do Carmo Passos Rodrigues, Silvia Maria de Freitas, Bruno Burnier Arcanjo Ferreira and Vanderson da Silva Costa

The number of researches that evaluate how behavioural and personality issues affect consumers’ acceptance and perception of food is increasing. Thus, this study aimed to…

Abstract

Purpose

The number of researches that evaluate how behavioural and personality issues affect consumers’ acceptance and perception of food is increasing. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of nutritional information and health claims related to soya and cashew nut beverages over consumers’ acceptance and perception regarding nutritional value and healthiness and to verify whether behavioural and personality issues affect such evaluation.

Design/methodology/approach

The samples were evaluated in two phases, with (blind phase) and without information (informed phase) about their composition, nutritional characteristics and functional claims related to some of their ingredients. The sensory evaluation data were analysed by means of the analysis of variance for repeated measures, applying 2 (information) × 2 (beverage) and generalised linear model to evaluate the effect of information over the acceptance averages, as well as over the perception of healthy food and nutritional value.

Findings

Information on composition, nutritional characteristics and functional claims related to the cashew nut and soya beverages did not influence flavour acceptance (p-value = 0.250) and overall impression (p-value = 0.316), but had a positive impact on consumers’ perception regarding healthiness (p-value < 0.001) and nutritious value (p-value < 0.001) of both beverages, the cashew nut beverage being perceived as more nutritious and healthier than the soya beverage. Consumers’ different characteristics with respect to their interest in healthy eating (high and low) and food neophobia (neophiliacs and neophobics) did not have any influence on the beverages’ acceptance, as well as on the perception of healthy food and nutritious value.

Originality/value

This work compares consumers’ acceptance and perception regarding nutritional value and healthiness with relation a totally unique product in the Brazilian market, and in the world, a new functional beverage made from cashew nuts, with a soya-milk beverage. Until this moment, there are no studies comparing consumer acceptance and perception of products based on hydrosoluble extract-base added with fruit juice which evaluate the influence of behavioural and personality characteristics of consumers in their perception and acceptance towards these products.

Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Zhihao Zheng, Yang Gao, Yijing Zhang and Shida Henneberry

The purpose of this paper is to analyze changes in consumers’ knowledge and acceptance of genetically modified (GM) foods over the past decade and identifies the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze changes in consumers’ knowledge and acceptance of genetically modified (GM) foods over the past decade and identifies the determinants in the consumer attitudes toward GM foods in urban China.

Design/methodology/approach

The data used in this study were collected from 952 urban consumers in 2013 in 15 provinces. The ordinal logit model was chosen to identify the determinants in the consumers’ subjective knowledge and acceptance of GM foods.

Findings

Results show that the consumers’ awareness of GM foods, biotech knowledge, and subjective knowledge improved significantly, while the acceptance rate toward GM foods declined considerably from 2002 to 2013. Moreover, the consumers’ subjective knowledge of GM foods had a significantly negative impact on their acceptance rate of GM foods. Finally, the media coverage with the “event of Golden rice in 2012” as a proxy helped consumers in shaping their negative perceptions toward GM foods, suggesting that the media coverage was one of major factors in leading to the low acceptance rate of GM foods in urban China.

Originality/value

The findings of previous studies conducted in the early 2000s might not reflect current Chinese consumer attitudes because the public opinion toward GM foods in modern China has considerably changed. This study thus filled in the void by updating estimates on consumer attitudes toward GM foods and by underlining the factors that have led to the changes in consumer attitudes, using a mass survey covering Chinese urban consumers in 15 provinces in 2013.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2019

Isabel Schäufele, Eric Barrera Albores and Ulrich Hamm

Even though insect products increasingly receive attention as a sustainable food alternative to meat, consumer acceptance remains low. The purpose of this paper is to test…

Abstract

Purpose

Even though insect products increasingly receive attention as a sustainable food alternative to meat, consumer acceptance remains low. The purpose of this paper is to test consumer acceptance of two different insect species with varying degrees of processing which led to different degrees of insects’ visibility.

Design/methodology/approach

Insect dishes that varied according to species and degree of visibility were presented to participants of a self-administered personal survey within a meal context. Consumer acceptance was measured through the willingness-to-try the different dishes, and a hierarchical linear regression was applied to estimate the role of insect species.

Findings

Consumer acceptance can be improved by focusing on different forms of food processing and different insect species. The lower the visibility of insects, the higher the consumer acceptance, independent of insect species. However, this is not sufficient to overcome consumers’ widely held rejection. Main barriers for consumer acceptance seem to be low social and cultural acceptance, fear of trying unknown products and a lack of taste experience.

Originality/value

A huge body of literature has examined determinants of insect consumption, but the majority of these studies did not consider the effects of insect species. The study’s main objective is to close this research gap while checking the most relevant individual traits as identified through a literature review: food neophobia and familiarity, social and cultural norms, awareness of benefits of insect production, meat consumption and socio-demographics.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 March 2022

Domenico Carlucci, Luigi Roselli, Giacomo Giannoccaro, Carla Cavallo, Teresa Del Giudice, Riccardo Vecchio, Gianni Cicia and Bernardo Corrado De Gennaro

This study aims to investigate consumer acceptance for a set of innovations that can be applied to the production process of extra-virgin olive oil. The final purpose is…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate consumer acceptance for a set of innovations that can be applied to the production process of extra-virgin olive oil. The final purpose is to verify whether, and to what extent, consumer acceptance of innovations varies depending on the type of technology used and the profile of consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional consumer survey has been carried out in Italy. A structured questionnaire was administered to a national representative sample of individuals who are responsible for grocery shopping (N = 1,003). Consumer acceptance for a set of ten innovations has been measured. Statistical differences between the various measures have been analysed through pairwise comparisons using Wilcoxon's signed-rank test, and subsequent effect sizes have been estimated. A cluster analysis has been also performed to distinguish consumer segments with different response patterns.

Findings

The results showed that the type of technology affects significantly the level of consumer acceptance of the tested innovations. In addition, high heterogeneity has been detected among consumer responses, and this leads to identify three consumer segments with different response patterns.

Originality/value

The study is focused on extra-virgin olive oil, which is one of the most important traditional food product in Mediterranean countries. This is the first study where several innovations for extra-virgin olive oil were jointly tested and compared for acceptance through a survey on a nation-wide representative sample of consumers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 March 2011

Kai Sparke and Klaus Menrad

The purpose of this paper is to develop a survey tool for consumer segmentation with respect to their food consumption style and to identify interesting consumer clusters…

4129

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a survey tool for consumer segmentation with respect to their food consumption style and to identify interesting consumer clusters for innovative food products development.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for this research were collected in a non‐stratified oral survey amongst 327 customers of food retail shops in southern Germany.

Findings

Cluster analysis of the data resulted in ten different consumption style segments. Additionally, consumers’ evaluation of the food product features were examined with conjoint analysis and interpreted both on a traditional preference level and on a newly elaborated acceptance level. Differences in preferences and acceptance can be observed for diverse food consumption style clusters and are the basis for target group specific food product design.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was limited in size but meaningful results could be obtained within the survey. Additional improvements can be realised in the developed survey instrument with respect to, for example, the used food consumption style descriptors, character of product innovations or the structure of the sample.

Practical implications

The developed approach can be used by food small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) to integrate consumers and consumer‐related aspects in their product development and innovation activities.

Originality/value

A new approach for consumer segmentation is developed within the paper and tested in a field study in Germany. A new acceptance simulator tool uses conjoint data innovatively to gather deeper consumer feedback.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Concetta Nazzaro, Marco Lerro, Marcello Stanco and Giuseppe Marotta

The purpose of this paper is to investigate consumer’s acceptance toward product innovation in the agri-food sector, uncovering consumers’ characteristics able to…

1680

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate consumer’s acceptance toward product innovation in the agri-food sector, uncovering consumers’ characteristics able to encourage food innovation acceptance.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis was carried out by administering a web-based structured questionnaire to a convenient sample of 443 Italian consumers. The study relies on consumers’ willingness to pay (WTP) to assess consumers’ acceptance toward the innovative product, while the Food-Related Lifestyle scale was applied to perform a cluster analysis aiming at detecting the attitude of consumers toward innovations in a traditional food.

Findings

The study findings showed a clear openness of consumers toward product innovation. Indeed, consumers’ WTP for the innovative product was far higher than the traditional one. Further, two out of three consumers’ groups detected (i.e. pro-innovation and rational adopters) exhibit a broad correlation between the innovative product attributes and consumers’ psychographics characteristics, revealing the existence of a large number of potential consumers.

Originality/value

The contribution of the paper to the current literature is twofold. First, it focused on an emerging topic for the agri-food sector (i.e. product innovation) whereby research works are still scarce. Second, product innovation was addressed toward a traditional food that is mostly reluctant to innovation due to consumers’ resistance and skepticism.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 July 2022

Valérie Hémar-Nicolas, Gaëlle Pantin-Sohier and Céline Gallen

While recent academic research on entomophagy has predominantly focused on adults, the purpose of this child-centred research is to obtain a better understanding of young…

91

Abstract

Purpose

While recent academic research on entomophagy has predominantly focused on adults, the purpose of this child-centred research is to obtain a better understanding of young consumer acceptance of insect-based foods.

Design/methodology/approach

Two qualitative studies were conducted with a total of 43 French children aged 8–13 years. Study 1 (n = 22), based on semi-directive interviews, and Study 2 (n = 21), based on focus groups, included projective techniques and exposure to different types of insect-based products to help children express their feelings and thoughts.

Findings

The evidence shows that in Western children’s minds, insects are considered as culturally non-edible. Children predominantly reject insects as food because of their sensory properties and the disgust they arouse. However, their interest in eating insect-based food is embedded within experiential contexts specific to childhood, in particular the peer group, which makes insect-eating fun and challenging, and the family, which offers a protective and reassuring setting.

Practical implications

The authors advocate changing children’s sensory perception of insect-eating food through sensory and participatory activities. Manufacturers and policymakers should also draw on children’s peer culture to associate insect-eating with positive social experiences and foster peer influence.

Originality/value

Drawing on cognitive psychology theories and the literature in food science on food rejection, the authors contribute to emerging consumer research on alternative food consumption (AFC) focusing on cognitive, emotional and social factors of acceptance or rejection of insect-based foods by children.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Radhika Bongoni

Contemporary business is rather global. Food imports and exports are expanding beyond borders to meet increasing domestic and international food and consumer demands…

Abstract

Purpose

Contemporary business is rather global. Food imports and exports are expanding beyond borders to meet increasing domestic and international food and consumer demands. Genetically modified (GM) food emerged as a potential sustainable solution which aims at meeting consumer demands and to mitigate urgent global food security problem. Because of its nature of existence, GM food is a controversial topic in several countries and has varied acceptance rates by consumers. Both government and consumers are antagonistic towards GM foods in most European countries. In contrast, most Asian consumers are neutral and so do not oppose GM foods. The purpose of this viewpoint paper is to examine the factors determining the difference in acceptance of GM foods between cultures. Such information can facilitate policy implications for governments in global agri-food trade and for producers in segregating markets.

Design/methodology/approach

Extensive literature review is done to base the discussions of this viewpoint paper.

Findings

This paper presents five factors that describe the difference in acceptance of GM foods between Europeans and Asians: knowledge and trust over the institutions performing research, uncertainty avoidance and health, gender differences, risk perception and material benefits and food for survival.

Originality/value

There is no systematic study that compares factors determining acceptance of GM foods across cultures.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 46 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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