Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 April 2015

Osman M. Karatepe and Sanaz Vatankhah

The purpose of this paper is to propose and test a conceptual model that examines career satisfaction (CSAT) as a mediator of the effects of high-performance work…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose and test a conceptual model that examines career satisfaction (CSAT) as a mediator of the effects of high-performance work practices (HPWPs) on service recovery performance, drawing from social information processing and Bagozzi’s (1992) reformulation of attitude theories.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered from flight attendants, with a time lag of two weeks in the private airline companies in Iran. The relationships were gauged using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results suggest that career opportunities seem to be the most important indicator of HPWPs, followed by rewards, selective staffing, empowerment, teamwork, job security and training. The results further suggest that the availability of HPWPs boosts flight attendants’ CSAT and that, in turn, results in elevated levels of service recovery performance.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the current literature by linking HPWPs, as manifested by selective staffing, job security, training, empowerment, rewards, teamwork and career opportunities, to service recovery performance through CSAT based on data obtained from flight attendants.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 70 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 October 2018

Shiva Ilkhanizadeh and Osman M. Karatepe

Drawing from servant leadership (SL) and social exchange theories, our study investigates trust in organization (TIO) as a mediator of the impact of SL on job, career and…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing from servant leadership (SL) and social exchange theories, our study investigates trust in organization (TIO) as a mediator of the impact of SL on job, career and life satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

A time-lagged survey design was used to gather data from flight attendants in Turkey. Structural equation modeling was used as the main analytic tool to assess these relationships.

Findings

The relationships proposed in the authors’ study receive full support from the empirical data. Specifically, TIO is one of the immediate outcomes of SL that engenders job, career and life satisfaction at elevated levels. The results highlight the impacts of job and career satisfaction in the intermediate linkage between SL and life satisfaction.

Practical implications

Management should train managerial employees to enhance the understanding of SL, which boosts flight attendants’ TIO. Management should invest in human resources through training and empowerment. This makes flight attendants perceive that management does not violate psychological contract. Such employees develop TIO that in turn engenders higher job, career and life satisfaction. It is also important to reward servant leaders when they succeed in making flight attendants develop TIO and motivating them to have higher job performance.

Originality/value

Little is known about the consequences of SL in the extant service research. More importantly, there are still calls for research about the variables (e.g. TIO) mediating the relationship between SL and employee satisfaction outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1986

Mayday

THE necessity of carefully thinking out and following of emergency procedures even at times of great pressure and the need to relay information to the passengers is…

Abstract

THE necessity of carefully thinking out and following of emergency procedures even at times of great pressure and the need to relay information to the passengers is illustrated by an incident which occurred to a TriStar aircraft en route from Miami, Florida to Nassau, Grand Bahama Island. During this flight in 1983, the flight crew noted an indication of loss of pressure on the No 2 engine and shut it down. Rather than continue the descent to Nassau which was about 50 nautical miles away, the Captain decided to return to Miami because of better weather and technical approach aids there. However, after the aircraft's course was reversed and it levelled off at 16,000ft, the No 3 engine flamed out. The No 1 engine had also failed and the flight crew began a descent designed to maximise the glide distance and began efforts to restart the No 2 engine. At the same time, the flight crew considered it probable that they would be forced to ditch the aircraft and the flight engineer told the senior flight attendant to prepare the cabin for imminent ditching. After descending about 11,000 ft, the flight crew succeeded in restarting the No 2 engine and subsequently landed the aircraft safely in Miami. There were no injuries to the 162 passengers and 10 crew members.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 58 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Insights and Research on the Study of Gender and Intersectionality in International Airline Cultures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-546-7

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 5 July 2017

Abstract

Details

Insights and Research on the Study of Gender and Intersectionality in International Airline Cultures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-546-7

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2002

Abstract

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 December 2019

Niusha Talebzadeh and Osman M. Karatepe

The purpose of this paper is to propose a research model in which work engagement (WE) mediates the influence of work social support on job satisfaction (JS), in-role…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a research model in which work engagement (WE) mediates the influence of work social support on job satisfaction (JS), in-role performance (IRP), creative performance (CP) and extra-role performance (ERP).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from cabin attendants via three surveys two weeks apart and their pursers. The aforesaid relationships were assessed through structural equation modeling.

Findings

In general, there is support for the preponderance of hypotheses. Specifically, WE completely mediates the impact of coworker support on JS and IRP, while the impact of supervisor support on CP is completely mediated by WE. WE partly mediates the effect of coworker support on CP and ERP. Furthermore, the effect of supervisor support on JS, IRP and ERP is partly mediated by WE.

Practical implications

Management should make sure that the work environment consists of supportive supervisors and coworkers who are trained on how they can enhance the cooperation and collaboration among employees. Management should also create an employee platform where cabin attendants can contribute to service delivery process by sharing their experiences arising from passenger requests and problems.

Originality/value

The study extends and contributes to the current service research by assessing the impact of WE simultaneously on three performance outcomes. The study adds to current knowledge by investigating the mediating mechanism linking work social support to the attitudinal and behavioral outcomes. The study also controls the threat of common method variance with at least two procedural remedies, which have been rarely used in the current service research.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 69 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Tony Polito, Kevin Watson and Robert J. Vokurka

The aim of the discipline of Operations Management is to gain competitive advantage. Onemore recent and lesser‐known Operations Management technique that is finding…

Abstract

The aim of the discipline of Operations Management is to gain competitive advantage. One more recent and lesser‐known Operations Management technique that is finding greater acceptance is the Theory of Constraints (TOC). This paper illustrates the use of a specific TOC technique termed “The Thinking Processes” to solve an airline industry case toward improved competitive outcomes.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Inyong Shin, Won-Moo Hur and Hongseok Oh

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the emotional labor strategies of service employees differently influence the level of their creativity, and whether creative…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the emotional labor strategies of service employees differently influence the level of their creativity, and whether creative employees consequently benefit from that creativity in terms of achieving a high level of job performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors surveyed flight attendants from an airline in South Korea. The authors distributed 150 questionnaires to flight attendants, received 126 responses, and finally obtained 119 usable data. The authors used Mplus 7.13 to evaluate validity and test the hypotheses.

Findings

Whereas employees using deep acting were found to be less emotionally exhausted and more affectively committed toward their organization, which produced a high level of creativity, those who selected surface acting were shown to suffer more emotional exhaustion and have less affective commitment, which generated a low level of creativity. Customer service personnel behaving creatively resulted in superior official job performance appraisals.

Originality/value

This study makes distinct contributions to the literature by proposing emotional labor as the key antecedent of employee creativity in service organizations, by confirming emotional exhaustion and affective commitment as the motivational mechanisms through which emotional labor strategies influence service employee creativity, and by suggesting the value of employee creativity.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 20 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 May 2009

Abstract

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 81 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

1 – 10 of over 1000