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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2020

Maryam Dilmaghani

Using the Canadian General Social Survey of 2016, a large nationally representative dataset, the present paper compares different types of flexible work arrangements in…

Abstract

Purpose

Using the Canadian General Social Survey of 2016, a large nationally representative dataset, the present paper compares different types of flexible work arrangements in their associations with employee wellbeing and organizational outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The dataset contains 7,446 observations. Informed by the past scholarship, eight outcomes of job satisfaction, work-life balance satisfaction, organizational belonging, job motivation, perceived advancement prospects, perceived job security, workplace social capital, and turnover intentions are investigated.

Findings

First, employees with both flextime and flexplace, and only flextime, have a significantly higher job and work-life balance satisfaction. Second, the possibility of working from home without any discretion over timing does not elicit positive wellbeing outcomes. Third, the results show that the combination of flexplace and flextime is synergistic. Fourth, rather unexpectedly, the positive associations of the FWAs with work-life balance satisfaction are stronger among men and women without dependent children. Finally, there are significant positive associations for the combination of flexplace and flextime, and flextime alone, with other outcomes, such as organizational belonging and job motivation, especially among men.

Practical implications

Given the nonrandom assignment of the workers into the FWAs, the results only reflect ceteris paribus correlations.

Originality/value

This is the first Canadian study of flexible work arrangements, using a large nationally representative dataset.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Marie‐Pierre Picard

ABB’s commitment to adding value for customers includes a constant quest for innovation and improvement – new ideas, new thinking, new solutions and stronger customer…

Abstract

ABB’s commitment to adding value for customers includes a constant quest for innovation and improvement – new ideas, new thinking, new solutions and stronger customer relationships. FlexPlace is an example of that new thinking. Developed at ABB’s body‐in‐white facility in France, it is a software solution that will greatly improve efficiency and cost‐effectiveness in auto body assembly. Robots with FlexPlace use sensors and pattern recognition to automatically assemble the larger parts of a car, like the roof and the doors, with sub‐millimeter accuracy, and do away with the heavy and expensive tooling traditionally used.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2019

Inocencia María Martínez-León, Isabel Olmedo-Cifuentes and M. Eugenia Sanchez-Vidal

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of work-life balance (WLB) practices on the financial results of Spanish accounting audit SMEs.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of work-life balance (WLB) practices on the financial results of Spanish accounting audit SMEs.

Design/methodology/approach

Using survey data from 148 Spanish accounting audit SMEs, a regression analysis was developed to estimate the direct effects of WLB practices on firms’ financial results (return on capital employed and return on assets). Firm age and size are considered as control variables.

Findings

Senior managers should foster some WLB practices (time-reduction and flexible-work practices) so as to enhance SME audit firms’ financial results. Work-leave practices should be analyzed so as to promote some positive outcomes for firms, through internal reorganization or by reorienting employees to resorting to the most beneficial practices.

Practical implications

Not all WLB practices have positive effects on the business results of SMEs. Therefore, managers may try to reduce these negative effects or redirect employees to WLB practices that have more positive effects on their firms’ financial results. Strategic information is also provided to employees and public institutions about fostering WLB in SMEs.

Social implications

The availability of WLB practices has been deemed fundamental not only for policy makers and society, but also for the organizational culture and for human resource management practices.

Originality/value

This study is the first to investigate the association between the availability of WLB initiatives in SMEs and firms’ financial results.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1989

David W. Rhodes and Margaret Regan

If employers are having a hard time finding capable employees today, just wait until tomorrow. Those responsible for recruiting entry‐level staff in the 1990s and beyond…

Abstract

If employers are having a hard time finding capable employees today, just wait until tomorrow. Those responsible for recruiting entry‐level staff in the 1990s and beyond will have their hands full. Demographic studies show that companies will be hard pressed to find an adequate supply of properly skilled young people from the generation that is about to enter the job market.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Cynthia A. Thompson

In 1987, Claire Logan, a sales representative for a garment manufacturer in New York City, was looking forward to her first bonus after moving to a commission‐based pay…

Abstract

In 1987, Claire Logan, a sales representative for a garment manufacturer in New York City, was looking forward to her first bonus after moving to a commission‐based pay schedule. She had brought in over US$5 million in sales for her employer, including a new $2 million account with a major department store, and was owed a $15,000 bonus. After receiving a partial payment of $5,000 from her employer, Logan discovered she was pregnant and informed her boss. Within days she found herself out of a job and short $10,000 of the bonus owed to her. Logan filed a complaint against her employer with New York City's Human Rights Commission and four years later settled her claim of discrimination for $45,000.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2018

Christin L. Munsch and Lindsey Trimble O’Connor

The ideal worker norm refers to the belief that employees can and should be singularly devoted to work. Our purpose is to understand the extent to which workers buy into…

Abstract

The ideal worker norm refers to the belief that employees can and should be singularly devoted to work. Our purpose is to understand the extent to which workers buy into various components of ideal work and how unpopular components of the ideal worker norm persist. We hypothesize they persist, at least in part, because of pluralistic ignorance. Pluralistic ignorance entails situations in which most people privately reject a norm, but incorrectly assume others accept it.

Drawing on original survey data, we examine the extent to which US workers subscribe to a range of factors described in the ideal work literature. We test the pluralistic ignorance hypothesis by comparing workers’ agreement with, and their perceptions of their coworkers’ agreement with, these factors.

We find workers embrace some components of ideal work. Yet, regardless of gender or parental status, they dislike those components that involve working extremely long hours and prioritizing work at the expense of personal or family life. In addition, regardless of gender or parental status, workers experience pluralistic ignorance with respect to those components that involve prioritizing work at the expense of personal or family life.

Our findings suggest that researchers distinguish between different components of ideal work. They also suggest that everyone – not just women or parents – desire work–family balance. Lastly, because people often behave in ways that are congruent with what they mistakenly believe to be the norm, our findings suggest workers may unintentionally perpetuate family-unfriendly workplace standards.

Details

The Work-Family Interface: Spillover, Complications, and Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-112-4

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Abstract

Details

Threats from Car Traffic to the Quality of Urban Life
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-048144-9

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Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2018

Krista M. Brumley

The purpose of this chapter is to analyse the interplay between fathers’ perceptions of the workplace and how they enact fatherhood. Data were derived from qualitative…

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to analyse the interplay between fathers’ perceptions of the workplace and how they enact fatherhood. Data were derived from qualitative in-depth interviews with seven elite, professional fathers employed at multinational manufacturing corporations in Detroit, Michigan. Fathers are highly educated, have a significant income and all but one have wives in the paid labour market. This study shows how the persistence of the ideal worker norm and penalties for using work-family policies (WFP) perpetuate the gendered division of paid and unpaid work. First, fathers who are ideal workers are rewarded; fathers who do not face criticism and obstacles to promotions. Second, management and supervisor’s discretion results in uneven access to WFP, penalizing fathers for asking and preventing most from using them. Third, fathers express desire to be ‘involved’, but their engagement is largely visible fatherhood.

This study extends our theoretical understandings of work, WFP and fatherhood from a distinct departure point – the elite fathers highlighted here have been parenting for at least three years, and live and work in circumstances that seemingly would allow them to disrupt normative expectations of work and family. The United States provides a unique backdrop to examine the navigation of competing work and family demands because reconciliation is largely left to employees and their families. Public and individual company policies are not enough; there must be a corresponding supportive family-friendly culture – supervisor support and penalty-free WFP – to disrupt gendered work and family.

Details

Fathers, Childcare and Work: Cultures, Practices and Policies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-042-6

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Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

J. S. Osland, M. E. Mendenhall, B. S. Reiche, B. Szkudlarek, R. Bolden, P. Courtice, V. Vaiman, M. Vaiman, D. Lyndgaard, K. Nielsen, S. Terrell, S. Taylor, Y. Lee, G. Stahl, N. Boyacigiller, T. Huesing, C. Miska, M. Zilinskaite, L. Ruiz, H. Shi, A. Bird, T. Soutphommasane, A. Girola, N. Pless, T. Maak, T. Neeley, O. Levy, N. Adler and M. Maznevski

As the world struggled to come to grips with the Covid-19 pandemic, over twenty scholars, practitioners, and global leaders wrote brief essays for this curated chapter on…

Abstract

As the world struggled to come to grips with the Covid-19 pandemic, over twenty scholars, practitioners, and global leaders wrote brief essays for this curated chapter on the role of global leadership in this extreme example of a global crisis. Their thoughts span helpful theoretical breakthroughs to essential, pragmatic adaptations by companies.

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-592-4

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Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2018

Melissa Rector LaGraff and Heidi E. Stolz

Work–family balance is important for working parents, their children, and their family functioning. However, little research has considered how one’s sense of work–family…

Abstract

Work–family balance is important for working parents, their children, and their family functioning. However, little research has considered how one’s sense of work–family balance may influence parenting behavior. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether perceived work–family balance of fathers of infants predicts engagement behaviors and whether stress mediates this relationship. The sample (n = 64) completed a phone survey, and data analysis consisted of linear regression tests and path analysis models for mediation. Perceived work–family balance did not significantly predict overall father engagement, but did predict fathers telling stories to their infant more often (B = 0.91, t(55) = 2.22, p < 0.05) and dressing their infant more often (B = 0.70, t(55) = 2.05, p < 0.05). Although perceived work–family balance was found to have a significant negative effect on father stress (r = –0.48, p < 0.001), stress did not mediate the relationship between perceived work–family balance and the two engagement behaviors. Greater perceived work–family balance may encourage engagement in behaviors above and beyond the stereotypical fathering behaviors (e.g., playing) and basic caregiving behaviors (e.g., changing diapers). Limitations include a small sample size, cross-sectional nature of the data, and self-report measures. It is recommended future studies use longitudinal designs, larger samples that differ in family type, and include mothers. This study provides preliminary evidence that one’s perceived work–family balance may influence parenting behaviors; thus, workplace policies that increase work–family balance, through greater job flexibility, for example, could promote positive family outcomes and reduce stress.

Details

The Work-Family Interface: Spillover, Complications, and Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-112-4

Keywords

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