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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2019

Maria Gravari-Barbas and Sébastien Jacquot

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the mechanisms involved in the progressive integration of marginal and peripheral urban areas, located close to established tourist…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the mechanisms involved in the progressive integration of marginal and peripheral urban areas, located close to established tourist destinations, into the visited tourism perimeter, and the interplay of the supporting public and private actors. It focusses on the intertwining processes of commercial gentrification, heritagization and aestheticization of former “ordinary” or marginal areas as tools for and indications of their tourism development. It explores how the metropolitan tourism geography is progressively redesigned.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a comprehensive literature analysis, the Saint-Ouen flea market was selected as the object of study. The methodology is based on extensive in situ observations, a systematic analysis of the press and a corpus of tourist guides and several in-depth interviews with local public and private stakeholders.

Findings

This paper shows that combined public (Parisian urban and tourism stakeholders) and private interests led to the integration in the tourism perimeter of a space that was once on the margins of the tourism and metropolitan area. It highlights the mechanisms of this integration and the link between touristification, gentrification, aestheticization and artification. It was found that private investors and political decision makers regard Saint-Ouen flea market as a major opportunity for tourism and real estate development, which leads to some contradictions regarding heritage protection. Finally, it shows that market traders opposed the evolution of a commercial place into a place of symbolic consumption. At another level, it shows the stakes of tourism diversification in a metropolitan tourism destination that is characterized by overtourism.

Research limitations/implications

More studies are needed to identify not only the potential of flea markets to diversify tourist areas and practices, but also any potential resistance. The consequences on metropolitan tourism can be the subject of additional investigations: can this tourism diversification reduce overtourism in the centre, or is it only a diversification that functions as an additional driver of attractiveness? This research opens new perspectives on the modes of diversification (spatial and experiential) of metropolitan tourism as well as on the role that commercial changes play in these evolutions. It also makes it possible to question the modes of engagement of investors and traders in tourism.

Originality/value

This is an in-depth analysis of the case of Saint-Ouen flea market. The issues raised herein are applicable to similar peripheral urban areas, flea markets especially, that are rarely studied on the tourism-aestheticization-gentrification nexus. The analysis also shows the diversification of places and imaginaries of metropolitan tourism.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2016

Jenniina Sihvonen and Linda Lisa Maria Turunen

Brand management and marketing have focused on brand-new goods, thus largely neglecting the emergence of markets for used products. This study sheds light on how consumers…

Abstract

Purpose

Brand management and marketing have focused on brand-new goods, thus largely neglecting the emergence of markets for used products. This study sheds light on how consumers determine the perceived value of fashion brands in online flea markets. In addition, this study aims to illustrate how fashion brands are perceived when sold second-hand in Facebook flea markets.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical data, consisting of internet discussions, were collected for this study from seven Facebook flea market forums between Fall 2014 and Fall 2015. The discussions were analyzed by means of qualitative content analysis.

Findings

In the context of flea markets, the perceived value is negotiated and evaluated through six antecedents: perceived quality, price, design, origin, authenticity and brand availability. Not surprisingly, price and quality appear as focal aspects when determining the value of a used brand in second-hand markets. However, the aspects of availability, origin and design complicate the considerations of the perceived value and can distinguish between different flea markets for fashion brands. In online second-hand markets for fashion brands, the passing of time appears to be an important factor grounding the consumers’ considerations of the perceived value.

Originality/value

This study brings forward novel viewpoints to brand marketing by discussing the formation of the consumer-perceived value in the growing field of online second-hand sales of fashion brands.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Anne de Bruin and Ann Dupuis

Attempts to explore the complexities in the operation of the largest and best example of New Zealand’s approximation of street vending known as the Otara Flea Market. Aims…

Abstract

Attempts to explore the complexities in the operation of the largest and best example of New Zealand’s approximation of street vending known as the Otara Flea Market. Aims to understand the way that less formalized economic activity operates as part of the coping strategies of people in communities caught by the domestic response to changes in the global economy. Uses participant observation to categorize the nature, size and general profile of the vendors, document analysis of legal and newspaper reports, together with in‐depth interviews with vendors.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 20 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Sanda Renko and Kristina Petljak

Despite modern retail formats, for many cultures, informal markets (street markets, farmers’ markets, or wet markets in Asia), fleas, and bazaars still remain an important…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite modern retail formats, for many cultures, informal markets (street markets, farmers’ markets, or wet markets in Asia), fleas, and bazaars still remain an important part of life. The purpose of this paper is to provide further insight into the characteristics of informal retailers, and to explain their growth and longevity in markets.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to explore what attracts customers to informal retail markets, a survey conducted on the sample of Croatian consumers was carried out.

Findings

The results show that consumers point out fresh, affordable, and healthy products and relationships with vendors as the main advantages, while weather conditions, unattractive food, and crowds are the disadvantages and barriers of purchasing at informal markets.

Practical implications

The results presented give directions for various subjects on how to increase the popularity of informal markets.

Originality/value

This paper addresses consumers’ perception of informal markets in the context of an emerging country. With the literature review, and the results of the explorative survey, it contributes to the knowledge on this type of retailing.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2010

Dale S. Rogers, Zachary S. Rogers and Ronald Lembke

Secondary markets provide a place for unwanted items to be bought and sold, which diverts them from landfills, reducing the products' ecological impact and creating…

Abstract

Purpose

Secondary markets provide a place for unwanted items to be bought and sold, which diverts them from landfills, reducing the products' ecological impact and creating economic value. The purpose of this paper is study the secondary markets to understand the size of this important portion of the US economy.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from financial reports, news articles, and interviews with subject experts. From all of these sources, the scope and size of secondary markets can be estimated.

Findings

Secondary markets are effective in diverting a large number of products from landfills, creating numerous jobs, resulting in substantial economic value in the process. Although not reflected in current government metrics, a conservative estimate is that the secondary market represents 2.28 percent of the 2008 US gross domestic product.

Research limitations/implications

Several of the secondary markets have many small players, with no strong trade associations or other authorities to estimate their size. The paper's estimates based on known sources are very conservative, perhaps underestimating the size of these sectors.

Practical implications

As society increasingly pays attention to the ecological impact of its products, secondary markets will play an important role in supply chains. Understanding the magnitude, structure and reach of these markets can help firms develop better product stewardship and lifecycle management.

Social implications

Individuals will not directly change their behavior from this research, but the findings should help companies behave differently, which in the end will offer products with lower ecological impact.

Originality/value

Secondary markets are an integral part of the US economy, and have not been adequately studied.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Tim Christiansen and David J. Snepenger

Thrift shopping (the buying of previously owned products) provides products and shopping pleasure for consumers of all economic levels, however, little is known about how…

Abstract

Purpose

Thrift shopping (the buying of previously owned products) provides products and shopping pleasure for consumers of all economic levels, however, little is known about how information regarding thrift shopping is acquired by consumers. This research aims to investigate whether there may be a “thrift maven,” someone who could and does transmit information about the thrift market to other individuals.

Design/methodology/approach

A scale was developed from previous research to identify thrift mavens. Data were collected via survey to see if the scale could be used to segment the market and to assess differences in the mavens' demographics and shopping patterns.

Findings

The study found the scale valid and useful. Thrift mavens were found to have lower household incomes, but were as likely to be male as female. This finding was surprising since thrift shopping is a more difficult method of acquiring products, and males in the USA are notable for their dislike of the task of shopping. The study also found that thrift mavens both shop and purchase from thrift outlets more frequently than non‐mavens.

Research limitations/implications

This was a single study in a single setting. Future research should examine whether this type of individual exists across a range of living conditions (e.g. rural, urban settings) as well as examining such areas as the type of behaviors mavens may engage in to assist fellow thrift shoppers.

Originality/value

The value of this paper is in identifying a segment of consumers who may be key informants for other consumers interested in thrift shopping. Thrift outlets typically have a limited promotional budget, at best, and thrift mavens would be a key resource to identify and encourage to shop at the outlet in order to pass on information.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2005

Susie Pryor and Sanford Grossbart

This article seeks to demonstrate how sociological perspectives and ethnographic methods provide insights into extraeconomic and suprafirm factors that may contribute to…

Abstract

Purpose

This article seeks to demonstrate how sociological perspectives and ethnographic methods provide insights into extraeconomic and suprafirm factors that may contribute to the functioning and character of downtown business districts. The study is intended to suggest directions for future research, rather than provide a definitive test of specific propositions.

Design/methodology/approach

A long‐term field investigation of a Midwestern American Main Street is presented in an extended case study format. Participant observation, depth and field interviews, and secondary data collection are the primary methods employed.

Findings

The findings suggest three dialectics that reflect extraeconomic dimensions underlying vital Main Streets. These include continua regarding the structure, function, and festive nature of marketplace activities. In this study, relatively few marketplace activities were commercial functions. Moreover, most were co‐produced by consumers and marketers. The extent of co‐production may contribute to the functioning and character of this vibrant downtown business district.

Research limitations/implications

This study was designed foster future research regarding the downtown business district as an historical sociocommercial entity. However, it does not test specific hypotheses.

Practical implications

This article should interest retailers, rural economists, city planners, and economic development agencies due to its focus on sociocommercial aspects of small city commercial centers.

Originality/value

The article highlights the extraeconomic importance of downtown business districts. It presents a case study of a successful Main Street, in contrast with studies that focus on the geographic, economic, and competitive factors related to failed or failing Main Streets.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 33 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2019

Karan Khurana and Ruth Tadesse

This paper aims to highlight the relevance of second-hand clothing (SHC) in the Ethiopian textile and apparel value chain by investigating its potential and establishing a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight the relevance of second-hand clothing (SHC) in the Ethiopian textile and apparel value chain by investigating its potential and establishing a connect to sustainability from a consumption point of view.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary and secondary methods of research were used in this research. Structured observational technique was used to identify the retailers in the city. In total, 70 retailers of SHC were identified and 15 big size retailers were interviewed with open end questions through judgment sampling method.

Findings

From the analysis of the field research and scientific literature, the authors strongly believe that SHC has an important space in the consumer retail segment of the country. This trade remains in the shadow but is sustaining livelihoods of citizens. The SHC trade provides an automatic balance to the future excessive consumption which is a result of mass production and hence should be encouraged further on various dimensions.

Originality/value

Existing literature exhibits statistics of the trade and impact in East African Community (EAC) missing out on Ethiopia as it is not a member of the EAC. Moreover a connection of SHC to sustainability established has never been established in the past for under-developing countries, and it is one of the critical factors in the success of used clothing and future of textile and apparel business. This research also provides channelized solutions to the business for smooth implementation of SHC in Ethiopia and other under-developing countries.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Steve Balkin and Alfonso Morales

Presents a discussion of an Internet Web site started in reaction to attacks on an historic street market in Chicago, USA. Takes an advocate’s perspective rather than an…

Abstract

Presents a discussion of an Internet Web site started in reaction to attacks on an historic street market in Chicago, USA. Takes an advocate’s perspective rather than an academic one and shows how the site developed to provide information about street vending around the world. Discusses the success and problems of using the Internet for the purposes of helping the poor on a shoestring budget.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 20 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 20 January 2020

Jakob Demant, Silje Anderdal Bakken and Alexandra Hall

Internet use has changed the mechanics of drug dealing. Although this has spurred some initial academic interest in how markets and their users have been changing, the…

Abstract

Purpose

Internet use has changed the mechanics of drug dealing. Although this has spurred some initial academic interest in how markets and their users have been changing, the issue is still under-researched. The purpose of this paper is to understand how the organisation of the distribution of prescription drugs and other illegal drugs overlap in these online markets by analysing data gathered from observation of the Swedish Facebook drug market and its participants.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered during three months of digital ethnography conducted among Swedish Facebook posters supplemented by 25 interviews with sellers (20) and buyers (5). Screenshots and interview data were coded by carrying out an NVivo-based content analysis. The analysis is based on descriptive statistics of drug types, co-occurrence with other drugs, group size and the demographic characteristics of sellers. Additionally, the interviewees’ descriptions of the marketplace and their drug dealing or buying activities were included in the analysis.

Findings

In total, 57 Swedish Facebook groups that sold illegal substances were located. The groups rarely specialised in specific drug types, but were convened around demographic factors, such as specific cities and locales. The sales of prescription drugs were part of the overall activity of groups selling other illegal drugs, but they were more often sold in separate Facebook posts, possibly by specialist sellers. Swedish Facebook sales primarily concerned alprazolam, tramadol, pregabalin and clonazepam, and were sold by both professional and amateur sellers.

Originality/value

This study reports findings from a Nordic comparative study on social media drug dealing, representing the first in-depth study of digitally mediated prescription drug dealing outside of cryptomarkets.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

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