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Article
Publication date: 19 November 2021

Flavio Urbini, Antonio Chirumbolo, Emanuela Caracuzzo and Antonino Callea

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of intrinsic job satisfaction (JS) on organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) directed toward individuals (OCBs-I) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of intrinsic job satisfaction (JS) on organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) directed toward individuals (OCBs-I) and OCB directed toward organization (OCBs-O) via organizational identification (OID). Based on social exchange and social identity theories, it is hypothesized that OID may play a mediator role in the relationship between JS and OCBs-I and OCBs-O.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire investigating JS, OID and OCBs dimensions was administered to 719 Italian employees. The mediation hypotheses were analyzed through structural equation model, via bootstrap analysis, after preliminary analyses as correlations and measurement model.

Findings

Results showed a positive relationship between JS, OID and OCBs dimensions. Furthermore, OID partially mediated the positive effects of JS on OCBs-I and OCBs-O. These findings supported hypotheses, suggesting that OID may explain the psychological mechanism through which an employee intrinsically satisfied about own job will fulfill more extra-role performance, i.e. OCBs-I and OCBs-O.

Practical implications

Implications for human resource management policies are discussed: to HR professionals is proposed to implement interventions to enhance employees’ intrinsic satisfaction and identification with the organization, to increase consequently positive organizational behaviors such as OCBs.

Originality/value

This study attempted to examine the JS-OCBs relationship in more depth. For the first time, the JS on OCBs-I and OCBs-O were simultaneously investigated, with OID as a mediator: shedding new light on the relationship among these variables.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 July 2020

Antonio Chirumbolo, Antonino Callea and Flavio Urbini

The purpose of this study was to extend our knowledge of the relationship between quantitative and qualitative job insecurity and performance. On the basis of stress theories, we…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to extend our knowledge of the relationship between quantitative and qualitative job insecurity and performance. On the basis of stress theories, we hypothesised that qualitative job insecurity (QLJI) would mediate the negative effect of quantitative job insecurity (QTJI) on two different indicators of performance: task performance (TP) and counterproductive work behaviours (CPWBs). In addition, the authors hypothesised that the effect of QTJI on QLJI would be moderated by the economic sector (public vs private) in which employees worked. Therefore, the authors empirically tested a moderated mediation model via PROCESS.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were 431 employees from various Italian organisations. Data were collected using a self-report questionnaire measuring QTJI, QLJI, TP and CPWBs.

Findings

The results indicated that economic sector moderated the relationship between quantitative and QLJI. Both quantitative and QLJI were related to performance outcomes. Furthermore, QLJI mediated the effect of QTJI on TP and CPWB. However, this mediation was particularly apparent among employees in the private sector, supporting our hypothesised moderated mediation model.

Practical implications

The results suggest that managers of private and public organisations need to apply different policies to reduce the impact of job insecurity on CPWBs and increase the TP of their employees.

Originality/value

This study attempted to examine the job insecurity–performance relationship in more depth. For the first time, the effects of both job insecurity dimensions on performance were simultaneously investigated, with economic sector as a moderator and QLJI as a mediator.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2018

Flavio Urbini, Antonino Callea, Antonio Chirumbolo, Alessandra Talamo, Emanuela Ingusci and Enrico Ciavolino

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to investigate the goodness of the input-process-output (IPO) model in order to evaluate work team performance within the Italian…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to investigate the goodness of the input-process-output (IPO) model in order to evaluate work team performance within the Italian National Health Care System (NHS); and second, to test the mediating role of reflexivity as an overarching process factor between input and output.

Design/methodology/approach

The Italian version of the Aston Team Performance Inventory was administered to 351 employees working in teams in the Italian NHS. Mediation analyses with latent variables were performed via structural equation modeling (SEM); the significance of total, direct, and indirect effect was tested via bootstrapping.

Findings

Underpinned by the IPO framework, the results of SEM supported mediational hypotheses. First, the application of the IPO model in the Italian NHS showed adequate fit indices, showing that the process mediates the relationship between input and output factors. Second, reflexivity mediated the relationship between input and output, influencing some aspects of team performance.

Practical implications

The results provide useful information for HRM policies improving process dimensions of the IPO model via the mediating role of reflexivity as a key role in team performance.

Originality/value

This study is one of a limited number of studies that applied the IPO model in the Italian NHS. Moreover, no study has yet examined the role of reflexivity as a mediator between input and output factors in the IPO model.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Beatrice Piccoli, Antonino Callea, Flavio Urbini, Antonio Chirumbolo, Emanuela Ingusci and Hans De Witte

The purpose of this paper is to extend knowledge about theoretical explanations of the job insecurity-performance relationship. Specifically, the authors examine how and why job…

1693

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend knowledge about theoretical explanations of the job insecurity-performance relationship. Specifically, the authors examine how and why job insecurity is negatively associated with task and contextual performance (i.e. organizational citizenship behavior) and whether organizational identification may account for these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The mediational hypotheses were examined using structural equation modeling in a heterogeneous sample of Italian employees.

Findings

Consistent with social identity theory, results show that job insecurity is related to reduced levels of identification with the organization and, consequently, to low task and contextual performance. These findings suggest that employees’ behaviors in job insecure contexts are also driven by evaluations about the perceived belongingness to the organization.

Practical implications

The research supports initial evidence that it is possible to prevent low performance resulting from job insecurity by designing interventions to boost organizational identification. By ensuring a sense of belonging and providing a positive basis for employees’ social identity, managers may increase involvement and attachment to the organization.

Originality/value

This study provides a deeper understanding of behavioral reactions to job insecurity and adds a path unexplored so far, by introducing a theoretical perspective from social psychology. Job insecurity may represent a specific condition that leads organizational identification to be a key mechanism for employees and their behaviors.

Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Antonino Callea, Flavio Urbini and Antonio Chirumbolo

Employees need to feel secure to perform their job effectively, therefore job insecurity has an effect on organizational citizenship behaviour (OCB) and job performance; however…

3741

Abstract

Purpose

Employees need to feel secure to perform their job effectively, therefore job insecurity has an effect on organizational citizenship behaviour (OCB) and job performance; however, some organizational attitudes may reduce these negative effects. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of organizational identification (OID), as a process underlying the relationship between qualitative job insecurity, OCB and job performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Using social exchange theory (SET) and social identification theory (SIT), this study reports the responses of 201 white and blue collar Italian employees. Data were collected through a self-report questionnaire that used standard scales on qualitative job insecurity, OID, OCB and job performance.

Findings

Results of structural equation modelling revealed that the effect of job insecurity on OCB and job performance was completely mediated by OID. Fit indices of mediated model are very good and indirect effects, by bootstrapping, are significant.

Research limitations/implications

The research design was cross-sectional, and thus, cause-effect relationships cannot be discerned.

Practical implications

Organizations may address HRM policies to reduce job insecurity (e.g. through actions to organizational communication), and to increase OID (e.g. involving workers to the decision-making process and promoting team work).

Originality/value

For the first time in a Western context, OID was tested as mediator in order to explain the relationship between job insecurity, OCB and job performance. Furthermore, Drawing on SET, this study tried to integrate SIT to explain behavioural responses to job insecurity.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Antonino Callea, Flavio Urbini, Paula Benevene, Michela Cortini, Lisa Di Lemma and Michael West

The aim of this paper is to present the Italian version of the Aston Team Performance Inventory (the ATPI), to assess its psychometric properties and whether its factor structure…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to present the Italian version of the Aston Team Performance Inventory (the ATPI), to assess its psychometric properties and whether its factor structure reflects the input-process-output (I-P-O) model.

Design/methodology/approach

The ATPI was administered to 702 Italian employees working in teams, recruited from the National Health Service (50.3 percent) and from public and private organizations (49.7 percent). To assess the psychometric properties of the ATPI's items, evaluation of discriminating power was performed. In addition to the reliability analyses, a confirmatory factor analysis of the full I-P-O model was also conducted.

Findings

Significant results of the Italian version of the ATPI arise from the psychometric properties, dimensions and factor structure. Results align with the English version of the inventory.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was limited and was not selected randomly. Future research should, therefore, expand the sample size and involve several types of Italian organizations. Considering these significant results, future research should validate the Italian version of the ATPI.

Originality/value

To the authors' knowledge, the Italian literature is missing instruments for the assessment of team performance in organizations. Consequently, the present study provides evidence of the value of the Italian version of the ATPI.

Details

Team Performance Management, vol. 20 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 August 2012

Antonino Callea, Flavio Urbini and Delaney Bucknor

The purpose of this paper was to establish whether precariousness of life as determined by temporary employment contributed to anxiety and depression and whether its consequences…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to establish whether precariousness of life as determined by temporary employment contributed to anxiety and depression and whether its consequences on daily life were differentiated in relation to gender.

Design/methodology/approach

A structural equation analysis of anxiety and depression with aspects of precariousness of life as model predictors was explored with t‐test and correlation analyses used to explore gender differences in the study variables.

Findings

The structural equation model produced strong evidence to suggest that precariousness of life was a significant predictor of both anxiety and depression. Women reported significantly higher scores than men on distrust toward the professional future and the emotional consequences on everyday life, anxiety and depression. As hypothesized, the negative consequences of temporary work in personal and family life appear more evident in women.

Practical implications

The results suggest that organizations should promote training courses on coping strategies to prevent the negative impact of precariousness of life aspects on anxiety and depression.

Originality/value

This study provides evidence supporting that temporary employment contributes to health consequences, which apply differently by gender. The study broadens understanding of temporary work management especially in regards to its health impact on female temporary workers. Furthermore, the Precariousness of Life Inventory has demonstrated an ability to tap into the latent factors of precariousness of life, revealing important gender differences and an ability to contribute to anxiety and depression.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Content available
1067

Abstract

Details

Team Performance Management, vol. 20 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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