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Book part
Publication date: 15 April 2021

Abstract

Details

The Global Private Health & Fitness Business: A Marketing Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-851-4

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Abstract

Details

The Global Private Health & Fitness Business: A Marketing Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-851-4

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 May 2018

Mónica Haro-González, Raquel Pérez-Ordás, Alberto Grao-Cruces, Román Nuviala and Alberto Nuviala

The purpose of this paper is to determine how an instrument – designed to assess quality, value, and satisfaction – works, and compare results obtained in female users of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine how an instrument – designed to assess quality, value, and satisfaction – works, and compare results obtained in female users of unisex sports services and fitness centres and female users of exclusively female sports services and fitness centres.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 745 women belonging to 62 sports services and fitness centres took part in this study; 36.60 per cent were members of female-exclusive centres. The average age was 32.97±14.11 years. In total, 38.70 per cent of the women surveyed used the sports services and fitness centres twice a week for 66.37±32.87 minutes on average. The EPOD2 questionnaire was used. This instrument is made up of 25 items and measures quality, value, and satisfaction. The invariance of the factorial structure in the two groups was verified and regression coefficients were calculated for the relationships in the model.

Findings

The model is stable in both of the groups. Quality is a predecessor of value and satisfaction. Value is related to a large extent to Satisfaction. The dimensions of quality (activity, sports instructors, service personnel, and space) are directly related to value and/or satisfaction. There are significant differences in the standardised values that relate quality and its dimensions with the value and satisfaction between women users of female-exclusive centres and women users of unisex centres.

Originality/value

This paper is important because the findings of this study can be applicable to help sports services and fitness centres, whether unisex centres or female-exclusive centres, obtain better assessments from female users.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Yanni Afthinos, Nicholas D. Theodorakis and Pantelis Nassis

Aims to identify the aspects of service delivery deemed most important by the users of Greek fitness centers and to examine whether their desires differ according to the…

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Abstract

Purpose

Aims to identify the aspects of service delivery deemed most important by the users of Greek fitness centers and to examine whether their desires differ according to the type of fitness center they use as well as according to certain demographic and motivation patterns.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was based on the QUESC instrument developed by Kim and Kim. A total of 346 individuals who were members of public and private fitness centers in Athens/Greece completed the questionnaires. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) test was conducted for each item of the instrument in order to examine whether different groups had different desires for service delivery. Where a difference between group means was identified, Duncan's multiple range tests were performed to determine which means were significantly different.

Findings

The aspects of service delivery desired more by sports centers users refer to the tangible elements of the facilities, the personnel attitudes and abilities, attributes related to the cost of participation and items related to the programming and scheduling of services provided. The findings also suggest that significant differences of desires exist between males and females as well as between users of public and private sports centers.

Research limitations/implications

The sample of the fitness centers was convenient rather than statistical. The reason was that there is no official agency in Greece with a complete list of fitness centers.

Practical implications

This paper is a useful source of information for fitness centers management to identify their customers’ wants, take action to improve service delivery, and establish standards of performance to address the identified customers’ needs.

Originality/value

This paper sought to address questions on the way certain demographic variables and patterns of use might affect sports centers’ users’ desires, so that an information package can be applied in making marketing decisions for improving sports centers service delivery.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Book part
Publication date: 15 April 2021

K. Yildiz, E. Polat and S. M. Yildiz

Abstract

Details

The Global Private Health & Fitness Business: A Marketing Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-851-4

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Article
Publication date: 20 May 2021

Helena Ferreira Barbosa, Jerónimo García-Fernández, Vera Pedragosa and Gabriel Cepeda-Carrion

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the intention of using fitness app made available by the fitness centre to its members and their relationship with overall customer…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the intention of using fitness app made available by the fitness centre to its members and their relationship with overall customer satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study uses the extended unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT2) as the base model. All the hypothesised relationships were tested through partial least square structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM), in a quantitative study with data from 1,676 fitness consumers from Portugal.

Findings

The results support the ability of UTAUT2 in predicting the customer´s intention to use the fitness app. Performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, facilitating conditions, hedonic motivation and habit have a positive impact on behavioural intentions to use the fitness app. Performance expectancy and habit have the strongest relationships. Behavioural intentions are positively related both to the usage behaviour of the fitness app and to overall customer satisfaction.

Practical implications

The results of this study present a strong contribution for fitness centre managers, since it highlights the importance of using these apps as a way to increase customer satisfaction, increasing retention levels.

Originality/value

This study is paramount as regards to examine the behavioural intention to use the fitness apps that the fitness centres make available to their members using UTAUT2 model.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2019

Ching-Hung Chang, Leigh Robinson, Shih-Tung Shu and Shang-Chun Ma

Customers’ innovativeness regarding services and products affects their purchase behavior. The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderation effect of fitness

Abstract

Purpose

Customers’ innovativeness regarding services and products affects their purchase behavior. The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderation effect of fitness innovativeness (FI) (domain-specific innovativeness) and duration of stay on fitness customers’ revisit frequency.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a quantitative study. The purposive sampling survey method was used to obtain samples from the Taipei Nangang Fitness Center. Data were analyzed by moderated regression analysis.

Findings

The empirical results from 192 valid questionnaires that were obtained for data analysis revealed that FI has a positive impact on revisit frequency, and this impact is further increased if an individual is inclined to exercise and to stay longer at the fitness center.

Originality/value

A matrix of fitness innovator segments was developed to illustrate the research and managerial implications.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2019

John Douglas MacFarlane, Sean Phelps and Nico Schulenkorf

The purpose of this paper is to document and explore the perceptual motivations for voluntary and continued affiliation with a fitness industry register by its affiliates…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to document and explore the perceptual motivations for voluntary and continued affiliation with a fitness industry register by its affiliates (“members”) and non-affiliates (“non-members”). The formation of fitness industry registers to impart self-regulation is a common global occurrence. Their sustainment, however, is reliant on the motivations and voluntary support of industry members. Limited work has been done in this area.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study uses the interpretive research paradigm, involving semi-structured interviews with 12 Auckland, New Zealand, fitness centre managers, industry associations, New Zealand Register of Exercise Professionals (Reps NZ) and Fitness New Zealand. Lenox’s (2006) participation-contingent benefits framework provides the necessary lens to explore the perceptual motivations behind participation/non-participation by fitness centres with an industry self-regulatory system (i.e. Reps NZ).

Findings

Whereas participation-contingent benefits are perceived minimal, and exceeded by affiliation limitations, there is institutional congruence for industry regulation to exist, thus creating institutional pressures that encourage affiliation and retention. Whereas affiliates choose to absorb the associated inconveniences of affiliation to “support” Reps NZ, non-affiliates question the register’s regulatory form, choosing to avoid the affiliation costs and limitations.

Originality/value

This study lends further support that institutional development is crucial for inclusive, substantive and sustainable self-regulatory systems. Regardless of the perceived low return on participation-contingent benefits, industry self-regulation can be sustained if there is a desire by industry members to maintain the institutional notion that the regulation needs to exist.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

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Abstract

Details

The Global Private Health & Fitness Business: A Marketing Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-851-4

To view the access options for this content please click here
Case study
Publication date: 19 June 2018

Stuti Saxena

Marketing management.

Abstract

Subject area

Marketing management.

Study level/applicability

Undergraduate/Postgraduate.

Case overview

The present case is a disguised one and is meant to enable students to critically analyse the operations and functioning of a fitness centre located in a city. Despite a runaway success, “Fit in” was facing problems of time-management and members’ management. Thus, catering to the members was becoming unwieldy, especially with respect to providing the personalized experience to the members, which was their forte. Thus, Mukesh and Naina faced the challenge of motivating their existing members and getting fresh referrals. Should they cut some of their services? Should they make some changes in manpower management? Or, should they change the operating strategy for their business?

Expected learning outcomes

Expected learning outcomes are as follows: how to ensure customer loyalty in service organization settings and how to enhance motivation among the service customers.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS: 3: Entrepreneurship.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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