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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2011

Martha C. Andrews, Thomas Baker and Tammy G. Hunt

This study seeks to explore the relationship between corporate ethical values and person‐organization fit (P‐O fit) and the effects on organization commitment and job…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to explore the relationship between corporate ethical values and person‐organization fit (P‐O fit) and the effects on organization commitment and job satisfaction. Further, it aims to examine the construct of moral intensity as a moderator of the P‐O fit‐commitment relationship as well as the P‐O fit‐job satisfaction relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 489 members of the National Purchasing Association in the USA, a structural model was examined in which it was hypothesized that corporate ethical values would be positively related to person‐organization fit and P‐O fit in turn would be positively related to commitment and job satisfaction. It was further hypothesized that the outcomes associated with P‐O fit would be moderated by moral intensity such that high moral intensity would strengthen the P‐O fit outcomes relationships.

Findings

All of the hypotheses were supported.

Research limitations/implications

All data stem from one data source, introducing the possibility of mono‐source bias. Additionally, all scales use self‐reports, introducing the possibility of mono‐method bias.

Practical implications

These results highlight the importance of corporate ethical values and moral intensity in building and maintaining an ethical and committed workforce.

Originality/value

The findings of this study contribute to the ethics and P‐O fit literature by establishing a link between corporate ethical values and P‐O fit. It further construes moral intensity as a subjective variable based on the perceiver rather than an objective characteristic of ethical issues. Moral intensity was found to strengthen the relationships between P‐O fit and satisfaction and P‐O fit and commitment.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Mert Aktaş

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating influence of idiocentrism and allocentrism on person-organization fit, person-job fit and work attitudes relationship.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating influence of idiocentrism and allocentrism on person-organization fit, person-job fit and work attitudes relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey data were collected from 426 employees of a holding company.

Findings

The results reveal that allocentrism makes a difference in fitting the particular aspect of work environment for the individual. Results showed that allocentrism positively moderates person-organization fit and job satisfaction and organizational commitment and turnover relationship. However, no moderating influence of idiocentrism was found on person-organization fit and employee attitude relationship. Furthermore, it was also found that neither idiocentrism nor allocentrism moderated the relationship between the person-job fit and employee attitudes relationship.

Originality/value

This research adds a cultural component to the person-environment fit research.

Details

Cross Cultural Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Pei Chen, Paul Sparrow and Cary Cooper

Drawing upon the theory of conservation of resources to argue the importance of job stress as an important variable that mediates the person-organization (P-O) fit-job…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing upon the theory of conservation of resources to argue the importance of job stress as an important variable that mediates the person-organization (P-O) fit-job satisfaction relationship, and supervisor support as an important moderating variable that moderates the relationship between P-O fit and job stress, the purpose of this paper is to test a moderated mediation model.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 225 employees in 12 catering service organizations in Beijing. An integrated mediation and moderation model was evaluated.

Findings

The study illustrates both some new mechanisms and the boundary conditions between P-O fit and job satisfaction. Job stress mediates the relationships between P-O fit and job satisfaction; supervisor support moderates the linkage of P-O fit, job stress, and job satisfaction. The corresponding moderated mediation model was supported.

Research limitations/implications

The question of causality cannot be determined because of the cross-sectional research design; self-report is a necessary strategy for the assessment of subjects’ appraisals. However, it requires some caution in interpreting the results.

Practical implications

The findings offer a better understanding of the way P-O fit is able to affect job satisfaction. Actions designed to promote P-O fit may be useful in reducing employees’ stress and result in higher job satisfaction. To enhance the relationships between P-O fit and employees’ job satisfaction through supervisor support, supervisors should develop a positive form of reciprocation by helping employees to solve the real problem they are facing.

Originality/value

No previous studies have investigated influencing factors of employees’ satisfaction from the perspective of individual and organizational interfaces.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Dessislava Dikova, Arjen van Witteloostuijn and Simon Parker

Extant work in international business (IB) involves a partial contingency-theoretic perspective: a holistic view of the impact of bundles of contingencies on an outcome…

Abstract

Purpose

Extant work in international business (IB) involves a partial contingency-theoretic perspective: a holistic view of the impact of bundles of contingencies on an outcome variable is missing. The purpose of this paper is to adopt a contingency approach to study multinational enterprise (MNE) subsidiary performance in the appropriate context of European transition economies at the beginning of the current millennium.

Design/methodology/approach

Methodologically, the authors introduce abduction as a line of inquiry into IB and management to develop new theoretical insights, and apply the novel empirical general interaction method to estimate bundle effects. In so doing, the authors contribute to the further development of a theoretical and empirical toolkit to revitalize holistic, or configurational, quantitative research in IB and management.

Findings

The authors find that capability fit is a necessary condition for high MNE subsidiary marketing performance, whilst environment fit is particularly critical for high MNE subsidiary financial performance.

Research limitations/implications

A key limitation is that this is a cross-section study.

Practical implications

This study offers insights as to subsidiary fit into Eastern Europe, indicating fitting entry and establishment modes.

Originality/value

This paper offers a novel holistic approach to IB, both in terms of theoretical and empirical methodology.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Jaleh Farzaneh, Ali Dehghanpour Farashah and Mehdi Kazemi

Drawing upon the social exchange theory and empowerment theory, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of perceived person-environment fit on…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing upon the social exchange theory and empowerment theory, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of perceived person-environment fit on organisational citizenship behaviour (OCB). Furthermore, this study assesses the roles of organisational commitment and psychological empowerment (PE) in this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Respondents of this study were employees of the Iran Northeast Gas Transfer Company. Data were collected through conducting a survey on 500 employees, of which 412 questionnaires were used for further analysis. Confirmatory factor analysis, structural equation modelling, Baron and Kenny's (1986) procedure for examining mediator effect, and finally Zhao and Cavusgil's (2006) technique of evaluating moderator effect were utilised for the analyses.

Findings

Results indicated that organisational commitment acts as a mediator between person-job (P-J) fit and person-organisation (P-O) fit and OCB. PE acts as a moderator between organisational commitment and OCB.

Practical implications

This research has implications for approaches to human resource management in organisations.

Originality/value

This study empirically synthesises the joint effect of P-O fit and P-J fit on a behavioural variable (OCB) in the social context of organisation and explains the mechanism of the effect. The pattern of relationships tested is relatively novel.

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Bilal Afsar and Yuosre Badir

There has been minimal research on the impact of an employee’s person-organization (P-O) fit on his/her innovative work behaviour (IWB). A number of studies have examined…

Abstract

Purpose

There has been minimal research on the impact of an employee’s person-organization (P-O) fit on his/her innovative work behaviour (IWB). A number of studies have examined the impact of P-O fit on multiple employee positive behaviours and outcomes; potential mediating effect of psychological empowerment is less frequently explored. The current study aims to fill this gap in the literature. To understand the psychology of P-O fit, this study has longitudinally analyzed the relationship between P-O fit and IWB both self and supervisor-based assessments and impact of psychological empowerment on this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 448 subordinates and 79 supervisors from two knowledge intensive industries in China. Structural equation modelling was used to analyze the relations.

Findings

Results of the study indicate that employee’s P-O fit is positively related to both self and supervisor ratings of innovative behaviours, and psychological empowerment acts as a partial mediator between P-O fit and IWB at both Time 1 and Time 2. These results imply that an employee’s perception of value congruence impacts his/her perception about feeling of empowerment which in turn helps in engaging him/her in to acts of IWB more often.

Originality/value

Study findings begin to explain how P-O fit impacts IWB of individuals. Specifically, the authors find that psychological empowerment explains the relationship between P-O fit and IWB.

Details

Journal of Chinese Human Resource Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8005

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2007

Tomoki Sekiguchi

The purpose of this paper is to propose a contingency perspective that describes the relative importance of person‐job (PJ) fit and person‐organization (PO) fit as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a contingency perspective that describes the relative importance of person‐job (PJ) fit and person‐organization (PO) fit as selection criteria for hiring various types of employees.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the theories of psychological contracts, human capital and cosmopolitan‐local perspective, propositions are developed regarding the relative importance of PJ fit and PO fit in specific hiring situations.

Findings

The propositions developed in this paper suggest that PJ fit will be more important than PO fit when organizations hire employees to form transactional psychological contracts, to obtain general human capital, and/or who are categorized as cosmopolitans. On the other hand, it is suggested that PO fit will be more important than PJ fit when organizations hire employees to form relational psychological contracts, to develop firm‐specific human capital, and/or who are likely to become locals.

Research limitations/implications

Further empirical and theoretical work should be conducted to elaborate the contingency perspective. A more comprehensive contingency theory of person‐environment (PE) fit could include other types of PE fit, other contingency variables, and cover a wider range of management practices.

Practical implications

Organizations should be aware of the trade‐off between PJ fit and PO fit in the selection process, and carefully examine what type of employees they will hire in order to determine the relative weights of PJ fit and PO fit as selection criteria.

Originality/value

This paper is the first attempt to consider the different types of employees and employment relationships that determine the relative importance of PJ fit and PO fit in selecting employees. It is done through incorporating different theoretical perspectives.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Jee Young Seong and Amy L. Kristof‐Brown

This study seeks to investigate the multidimensionality person‐group (PG) fit. It first aims to examine values‐based, personality‐based, and KSA‐based fit as distinct PG…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to investigate the multidimensionality person‐group (PG) fit. It first aims to examine values‐based, personality‐based, and KSA‐based fit as distinct PG fit dimensions. It then also aims to examine fit as an aggregate construct (each dimension combines to form a latent PG fit construct), and as a superordinate construct (an overarching assessment of compatibility drives the individual fit dimensions). It also aims to propose that the distinct dimensions or the overall perception predict commitment to team, employee voice, and knowledge sharing, resulting in a final outcome of employee task performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using longitudinal survey methodology from three different sources (793 employees, their supervisors and the Human Resources department) in a manufacturing firm in Korea. The various models were evaluated using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The distinct dimensions model, in which values‐based fit predicted commitment to the team, personality‐based fit predicted voice behaviors, and KSA‐based fit predicted knowledge sharing, was mostly supported. Each of these intermediary factors predicted supervisors' ratings of individual task performance. Although each dimension had unique impact on the outcomes, results suggested that a superordinate PG construct might be driving the more specific fit assessments. The aggregate model was not supported.

Originality/value

This study is the first to show how different dimensions of PG fit may differentially influence affect and behavior, to predict task performance. It also shows the first evidence for PG fit as a superordinate multidimensional construct. Results provide a basis for new knowledge regarding the multi‐faceted relationship between fit perceptions and outcomes.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2020

Sarah Bankins, Maria Tomprou and ByeongJo Kim

Although the physical environment provides an important context for employees' work, there remain divergent findings regarding how different spatial settings, such as more…

Abstract

Purpose

Although the physical environment provides an important context for employees' work, there remain divergent findings regarding how different spatial settings, such as more open or more closed workspaces, impact employees. Employing research on the functions of the physical work environment, we contribute to a growing body of research on employees' interactions with their workspace by developing and measuring the notion of person–space fit (P-S fit). This construct affords examination of the multi-dimensional nature of employees' interactions with their workspaces, to understand how their perceived fit with the key functions of their workspace impacts their experiences and social network activity at work.

Design/methodology/approach

We first develop a new P-S fit scale and test its factorial, convergent, discriminant, and incremental validity over other person–environment fit concepts (N = 155). Next, in a naturally-occurring, quasi-field experiment of a workspace change intervention moving employees from predominantly closed workspace to more open workspace (N = 47 pre-move; N = 37 post-move), we examine how changes in both workspace layout and P-S fit impact workers' experiences of their workspaces (needs for task privacy and spaciousness) and collaborative behaviors (social network activity).

Findings

Our P-S fit scale consists of theoretically and empirically validated dimensions representing fit with four workspace functions: aesthetic fit; identity fit; instrumental fit; and collaboration fit. Instrumental fit is positively associated with experiences of task privacy, whereas aesthetic fit and identity fit positively associated with experiences of spaciousness, but no forms of fit were related to social network activity. However, the findings show that work-related social network ties tended to decrease, and new ones were less likely to form, in open office spaces.

Originality/value

Contributing to a growing body of research linking person–environment fit literature to workspace design, this study offers a new scale assessing P-S fit and provides some empirical evidence of its importance for understanding the complexity of the employee-work environment interaction.

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Nurul Fadly Habidin, Sha’ri Mohd Yusof and Nursyazwani Mohd Fuzi

The aim of this paper is to develop a model that incorporate lean six sigma (LSS) implementation, strategic control system (SCS) and organizational performance (OP) in…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to develop a model that incorporate lean six sigma (LSS) implementation, strategic control system (SCS) and organizational performance (OP) in Malaysian automotive suppliers.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey through questionnaire was conducted to determine the level of LSS implementation, SCS and OP measurement. In all, 252 sets of questionnaire were successfully collected that brought to 64.3 per cent response rate. Structural equation modeling (SEM) technique was adopted to analyze the data gathered from the survey. Exploratory factor analysis, reliability analysis and confirmatory factor analysis for testing the construct validity, test for reliability and model measurement were carried out.

Findings

This study has provided a comprehensive measurement instrument to implement the LSS practices, SCS and OP for Malaysian automotive suppliers. As a result, seven LSS constructs, four for SCS and four measures for OP have been identified. This research model is a mediator model in which it investigates whether the presence of SCS mediates the relationship between LSS and OP. The analysis result through the SEM method showed that SCS does not affect the relationship between LSS and OP. However, SCS is improving OP when coupled with LSS.

Research limitations/implications

This study has only focused on the structured relationship between LSS Construct, SCS and OP measures. It is possible for other factors in the LSS practices to be studied in future experiments such as total productive maintenance, culture change, role structure and project management skills.

Originality/value

Future researchers could apply the LSS, SCS and OP measurement as a benchmark for use and can be replicated in other industry or country in the world with minor modifications on the critical factors necessary to suit the goals of the organization, culture and business environment. It could also be used as a business excellence and supplier selection tool for practitioners and researchers.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

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