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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Min‐Ping Huang, Bor‐Shiuan Cheng and Li‐Fong Chou

The current leadership literature has paid little attention to understanding the intervening mechanism by which leaders influence followers. In order to partially bridge…

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6103

Abstract

Purpose

The current leadership literature has paid little attention to understanding the intervening mechanism by which leaders influence followers. In order to partially bridge this gap, the article aims to present a valuefit charismatic leadership theory which focusses on the key intervening mechanism – person‐organization values fit.

Design/methodology/approach

The model was tested empirically on 180 participants, including 51 managers and 129 employees from 37 large‐scale companies in Taiwan.

Findings

Based on the block regression analysis, the results showed that CEO charismatic leadership has both direct and indirect effects on employees’ extra effort to work, satisfaction with the CEO, as well as organizational commitment, which are mediated by employees’ perceived person‐organization values fit. The findings also provided evidence that the relationship between charismatic leadership and person‐organization values fit is significant. Furthermore, the analysis also showed the significant effects of person‐organization values fit on employee outcomes.

Originality/value

The study shows how CEO charismatic leadership can, through the mediating effect of person‐organization values fit, have profound influence on employee outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2014

Mehlika Saraç, Ismail Efil and Mehmet Eryilmaz

Like all other human behaviors, creativity must be examined by considering both personal and situational influences. “Person-organization fit” (POF) provides a suitable…

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3778

Abstract

Purpose

Like all other human behaviors, creativity must be examined by considering both personal and situational influences. “Person-organization fit” (POF) provides a suitable theoretical perspective to investigate the congruence between persons and organizations in the domain of creativity. However, few studies have examined the effects of POF on creative behavior. Although the majority of these studies have identified a positive relationship between POF and creativity, it is suggested that congruent individuals are less likely to be inventive. The current study will examine the positive relationship between POF and employees' self-rated creativity in the Turkish context. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Subjective POF measures and a creativity measure were adapted for this research, and multiple regression was used to calculate whether and how POF relates to creativity.

Findings

Two important conclusions were found from the analyses. One of these significant interaction effects was found on employee creativity. And the second is congruence between personal values and current organizational values would effect employee creativity positively. Detailed findings and contributions have been discussed.

Research limitations/implications

Although providing an important contribution to POF and creativity literature, this study had some limitations. In this study, self-rating method has been used to measure employee creativity. However, supervisor rating is the most common way in field studies and gives more objective results than self-rating method.

Practical implications

The findings provide valuable information for human resource practitioner about the importance of situational factors as far as personal characteristics for enhancing creative behavior in organizations.

Originality/value

As far as it is known, there are few studies to examine the relationship between POF and creativity empirically. The majority of these researches examined the complementary fit (demand-abilities, need-supply, value-supply fit). On the other hand, this study specially has focused on supplementary fit (POF), rather than complementary fit and examined its relationship with employee creativity by considering a wide set of values in the Turkish context.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2022

Atri Sengupta and Shashank Mittal

Person-environment (PE) fit theory suggests that value congruence (fit) leads to the job pursuits intention (Cable and Judge, 1996) which is also influenced by cultural…

Abstract

Purpose

Person-environment (PE) fit theory suggests that value congruence (fit) leads to the job pursuits intention (Cable and Judge, 1996) which is also influenced by cultural norms (Ma and Allen, 2009). Due to stringent job market condition along with its people, as a part of collectivistic culture, having poor self-concept consistency, value congruence may unfold different phenomenon in Indian context. Therefore, the present study intends to explore the existing fit theory on different cultural norms and different job market condition with entry-level job pursuits as participants.

Design/methodology/approach

The fit was measured both objectively and subjectively in a mixed method research design. Top 100 institutes ranked in NIRF (National Institutional Ranking Framework) (under Management category) were approached for data collection and 41 institutes agreed to participate. Data were collected in four phases from 2,714 entry-level job pursuits and domain experts based on web-based job advertisements. Krippendorff's alpha was calculated for measuring objective fit, and the subjective fit was measured through quadratic structural equation modeling with response surface analysis.

Findings

Findings revealed lack of value congruence objectively; and no influencing role of subjective fit in job pursuits intention. This indicated that neither Indian employers nor entry-level job pursuits were concerned about value congruence. The post-hoc analysis suggested that poor self-concept consistency as a cultural norm led to such atypical findings.

Originality/value

The present study suggests that fit may lead to different phenomena of entry-level job pursuits intention with different contextual and cultural norms.

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Book part
Publication date: 16 October 2020

Donald L. Ariail, Katherine Taken Smith and L. Murphy Smith

As in other countries, the accounting profession in the United States strives to hire and keep qualified professionals, who possess the technical competence and ethical…

Abstract

As in other countries, the accounting profession in the United States strives to hire and keep qualified professionals, who possess the technical competence and ethical character essential to accounting practice. The reputation of the profession has been periodically tarnished by a lack of ethical behavior on the part of some Certified Public Accountants (CPAs). This suggests a misfit between those in the profession and the ethical values toward which the profession strives. When CPAs commit unethical behavior, doing so creates a major problem for the profession. Research has shown that the congruity of personal values with organizational values, person–organization fit (P–O fit), is an important factor in the hiring, socialization, and retention of employees. This research compares the personal values of US accounting students with the personal values of leaders in the accounting profession. Personal value priorities were measured with the Rokeach Value Survey (RVS). The findings indicated that these samples of accounting leaders (N = 193) and accounting students (N = 516) significantly differed in the priority given to 24 of the 36 personal values. This result suggests a lack of P–O fit between accounting students and the accounting profession. These findings have implications for CPA firms in the United States, specifically with regard to hiring ethically “fitting” staff and fostering an ethical culture in accounting firms.

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-669-8

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Book part
Publication date: 18 August 2006

Kerstin A. Aumann and Cheri Ostroff

In recent years, theory and research have been increasingly devoted to understanding organizational behavior in cross-cultural and global contexts, with particular…

Abstract

In recent years, theory and research have been increasingly devoted to understanding organizational behavior in cross-cultural and global contexts, with particular attention being paid to the appropriateness of various human resources management (HRM) practices because practices that may be effective within one cultural context may not be effective in other cultural contexts. This chapter argues that a multi-level perspective is needed to explain the interplay between HRM practices and employee responses across cultural contexts. Specifically, the multi-level framework developed in this chapter elucidates the importance of fit between HRM practices, individual values, organizational values, and societal values. Societal values play a key role in the adoption of HRM practices, and the effectiveness of these HRM practices will depend largely on “fit” or alignment with the values of the societal culture in which the organization is operating. HRM practices also shape the collective responses of employees through organizational climate at the organizational level and through psychological climate at the individual level. For positive employee attitudes and responses to emerge, the climate created by the HRM practices must be aligned with societal and individual values. Building on these notions, the strength of the societal culture in which the organization is operating serves as a mechanism that links relationships between climate, value fit, and attitudes across levels of analysis. The chapter concludes with some recommendations for future research and implications for practice.

Details

Multi-Level Issues in Social Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-432-4

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Francisco Guzmán and Donna Davis

A significant stream of research investigates the influence of corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives on firm performance and consumer response to CSR programs…

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5118

Abstract

Purpose

A significant stream of research investigates the influence of corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives on firm performance and consumer response to CSR programs. However, how CSR initiatives help build brand equity remains relatively unexamined. This study aims to demonstrate how CSR influences brand equity in response to perceptions of two types of brand–cause fit.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyze two types of fit between a brand and a social cause (disaster relief): brand value–cause fit and brand function–cause fit. Structural equation modeling is used to estimate the fit of the data with the proposed model.

Findings

Survey evidence from 370 millennial undergraduate students in the USA suggests that the two types of brand–cause fit have differential effects on attitude toward the brand and ad, which in turn influence brand equity.

Research implications/limitations

The research operationalizes brand–cause fit as a construct with two components: brand value–cause fit and brand function–cause fit. It tests these two types of fit and finds evidence for differential effects on consumer attitudes.

Practical implications

The findings offer practical considerations for managers about the importance of considering two types of brand–cause fit in selecting social causes and crafting effective corporate communications about the firm’s CSR initiatives.

Originality/value

Results suggest that it is possible for firms to craft desirable win–win–win strategies that build brand equity by investing in a strategic approach to CSR initiatives.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2018

Niina Hernández, Heikki Mattila and Lena Berglin

The purpose of this paper is to use a systematic model for detecting misfit between the garment and the target group.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use a systematic model for detecting misfit between the garment and the target group.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an empirical–analytical methodology, the systematic model was tested. The input data were run through the model to generate the output data, which were analysed, including basic statistics. The purpose of the analysis was to detect misfit and improve the garment measurement chart. This procedure was repeated until a clear result was reached.

Findings

The result of this study is an optimised garment measurement chart, which considers the garment’s ease, different sizes/proportions in relation to a target group. The results show that it is possible to use a systematic model to define the shortcomings of a garment´s range of sizes and proportions.

Research limitations/implications

Further studies are needed to verify the results of the theoretical garment fit and their values in relation to real garment fit.

Practical implications

If the systematic model is implemented to improve the theoretical garment fit, this may have effects on the available garment sizes and its proportions, resulting in increased theoretical garment fit for the target group.

Originality/value

The paper presents a systematic model for detecting and eliminating theoretical fitting; the model includes both garment ease allowance and defined points of misfit.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2008

Jean‐Marie See and Elizabeth H. Kummerow

An important aim of this paper is to ascertain the extent to which students held realistic expectations about the work cultures they were soon to enter. The paper also…

Abstract

Purpose

An important aim of this paper is to ascertain the extent to which students held realistic expectations about the work cultures they were soon to enter. The paper also aims to investigate the link between value congruence (in relation to both work and work‐family values) and “expected” job satisfaction and organisational commitment, in the case of the students, and “actual” job satisfaction and organisational commitment, in the case of the professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was used to survey a sample of final year BCom students from the University of Adelaide (n=52) and accounting professionals from the same city (n=50).

Findings

Significant person‐culture fit discrepancies, in relation to both work and work‐family values, were observed for both groups. For accountants, these were negatively associated with job satisfaction and organisational commitment. Students also expected to enter organisational cultures that supported work values that were significantly more supportive of these values than were the actual organisational cultures described by the accountants. For work‐family values, students' expectations, surprisingly, fell significantly short of what the accountants' actual experience suggested they would be likely to encounter.

Originality/value

A life stage interpretation of the findings for work‐family values is offered and consideration is given to their implications for a broadening of traditional conceptualisations of reality shock.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2007

Annelies E.M. van Vianen, Irene E. De Pater and Floor Van Dijk

The purpose of this article is to examine the relationship between work value PO fit with fit being operationalized as a same‐source or different‐source measure.

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4577

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to examine the relationship between work value PO fit with fit being operationalized as a same‐source or different‐source measure.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 94 employees from a company located in Curac¸ao completed a questionnaire in which they rated their personal work values, their perceptions of the work values of the organization, and their turnover intention.

Findings

The different‐source work value fit measure was significantly and more strongly related to turnover intention than the same‐source work value fit measure.

Research limitations/implications

This study underscores the need for a careful reflection on the content and operationalization of fit measures.

Practical implications

Managers are able to manage the fit of their employees by creating positive group level perceptions of the work environment.

Originality/value

This study examines the effects of different fit measures on individuals' turnover intention. Moreover, work values fit was investigated.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2020

Ziyang Song, Fan Yang, Edwin J. Boezeman and Xiaodong Li

The declining attractiveness of construction industry to the new-generation onsite construction professionals (OCPs) in China can be the result of insufficient supply of…

Abstract

Purpose

The declining attractiveness of construction industry to the new-generation onsite construction professionals (OCPs) in China can be the result of insufficient supply of what they desire at work. There is a lack of studies that make clear the work values of this cohort and the fit between their work value preferences and job supplies. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This study focused on Chinese new-generation OCPs. Work values and job supplies were measured by two rounds of questionnaire surveys. Factor analysis was implemented to identify work value types. Paired samples t-test, independent samples t-test and one-way ANOVA were performed to figure out work value preferences and degree of supplies–values (S-V) fit and compare them across subgroups.

Findings

Intrinsic, “good time”, work-team-related, altruistic/prestigious and extrinsic work value types were identified. Chinese new-generation OCPs most valued work-team-related and intrinsic work aspects, while significant insufficient supply was relevant to intrinsic, extrinsic and “good time” aspects. Work value preferences and S-V fit showed significant differences among subgroups of gender, growth background, work rank and project type.

Practical implications

The results provide insights for construction companies to practice work-value-based human resource management toward new-generation OCPs and make targeted measures to address the misfit between supplies and values experienced by these OCPs.

Originality/value

This study for the first time examined work values of Chinese new-generation OCPs. It opens a new perspective for research based on S-V fit theory that focused on industry level. The effects of demographic and professional variables on the work values and the degree of S-V fit were revealed. This study thus contributes to the extant literature of work values and S-V fit.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 27 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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