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Article

Martina K. Linnenluecke and Brent McKnight

The paper aims to examine the conditions under which disaster entrepreneurship contributes to community-level resilience. The authors define disaster entrepreneurship as…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to examine the conditions under which disaster entrepreneurship contributes to community-level resilience. The authors define disaster entrepreneurship as attempts by the private sector to create or maintain value during and in the immediate aftermath of a natural disaster by taking advantage of business opportunities and providing goods and services required by community stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper builds a typology of disaster entrepreneurial responses by drawing on the dimensions of structural expansion and role change. The authors use illustrative case examples to conceptualize how these responses improve community resilience by filling critical resource voids in the aftermath of natural disasters.

Findings

The typology identifies four different disaster entrepreneurship approaches: entrepreneurial business continuity, scaling of organizational response through activating latent structures, improvising and emergence. The authors formulate proposition regarding how each of the approaches is related to community-level resilience.

Practical implications

While disaster entrepreneurship can offer for-profit opportunities for engaging in community-wide disaster response and recovery efforts, firms should carefully consider the financial, legal, reputational and organizational implications of disaster entrepreneurship.

Social implications

Communities should consider how best to harness disaster entrepreneurship in designing their disaster response strategies.

Originality/value

This research offers a novel typology to explore the role that for-profit firms play in disaster contexts and adds to prior research which has mostly focused on government agencies, non-governmental organizations and emergency personnel.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article

Yiyi Fan and Mark Stevenson

Prior studies have largely overlooked the potentially negative consequences of a buyer’s relational capital (RC) with a supplier for supply-side resilience, assuming a…

Abstract

Purpose

Prior studies have largely overlooked the potentially negative consequences of a buyer’s relational capital (RC) with a supplier for supply-side resilience, assuming a positive linear relationship between the constructs. Meanwhile, the focus of research has been at an organisational level without incorporating the role of boundary spanning individuals at the interface between buyer and supplier. Drawing on social capital and boundary spanning theory, the purpose of this paper is to: re-examine the relationship between RC and supply-side resilience, challenging the linear assumption; and investigate how both the strength and diversity of a boundary spanner’s ties moderate this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data are collected from 248 firms and validated using a subset of 57 attentive secondary respondents and archival data. The latent moderated structural equation method is applied to analyse the data.

Findings

An inverted U-shaped relationship between RC and supply-side resilience is identified. Tie strength in particular has a positive moderating effect on the relationship. More specifically, the downward RC–supply-side resilience relationship flips into an upward curvilinear relationship when boundary spanning individuals develop stronger ties with supplier personnel.

Research limitations/implications

A deeper insight into the RC–supply-side resilience relationship is provided. Findings are based on Chinese manufacturing firms and cross-sectional data meaning further research is needed to determine their generalisability.

Practical implications

In evaluating how to enhance supply-side resilience, buying firms must decide whether the associated collaborative benefits of developing RC outweigh the potential costs. Managers also need to be concerned with the impact of developing RC between organisations and enhancing the tie strength of individuals simultaneously.

Originality/value

The paper goes beyond the linear relationship between RC and supply-side resilience. Incorporating the moderating role of boundary spanners identifies a novel phenomenon whereby the RC–resilience relationship flips from an inverted to a U-shaped curve.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 39 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article

Santanu Mandal

This paper aims to investigate the influence of supply and demand competence on supply chain (SC) resilience and its impact on a firm’s operational and relational…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the influence of supply and demand competence on supply chain (SC) resilience and its impact on a firm’s operational and relational performance. While the former competence refers to production and supply management-related activities, the latter refers to distribution and demand management-related activities. Within this framework, process compliance, i.e. how well SC management processes are internally executed by the firm’s employees, is observed as an enabler (moderator) on the relationship between SC competence and SC resilience. Further the model also explores the moderating influence of environmental uncertainty (EU) on the linkage between SC resilience and firm performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a Web-based cross-sectional survey from SC professionals working in different industries at various designations. Further, the collected data were analyzed using partial least squares for hypotheses’ testing.

Findings

The findings suggest a positive influence of demand- and supply-side competences on SC resilience. Supply chain resilience was also found to have a positive influence on operational and relational performance. Further, process compliance was found to positively moderate the relationship between the competences and resilience. Lastly, the relationship between resilience and performance was found to gain momentum in the presence of EU.

Research limitations/implication

Data were collected from a single respondent per firm. Hence, future research should attempt to collect data from multiple respondents for increased generalization.

Originality/value

The study holds significance for academicians and practitioners, as it investigates the importance of supply- and demand-side competences on the development of SC resilience and its impact on performance. This investigation showed that building resilience in a SC is dependent on the degree to which firms are process-compliant. Further, it was empirically proved that resilience’s positive influence on performance increases more with the presence of uncertainties.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 8 no. 02
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Article

Russell Charles Manfield and Lance Richard Newey

The purpose of this paper is to examine competing assumptions about the nature of resilience and selects those most appropriate for an entrepreneurial context. Assumptions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine competing assumptions about the nature of resilience and selects those most appropriate for an entrepreneurial context. Assumptions are integrated into a theoretical framework highlighting how different threats require different resilience responses. Overall organizational resilience results from a portfolio of resilience capabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

Akin to theoretical sampling, the authors identify various theoretical insights about resilience across three disciplines of psychology, ecology and engineering. The authors use these insights to distill competing assumptions about what resilience is and evaluate those most appropriate for entrepreneurial contexts. Existing resilience literature in organization science is critiqued in terms of underlying assumptions and an alternative theoretical framework proposed based on more robust assumptions.

Findings

Other disciplines point to resilience being a process that differs for different threats and as either bouncing back, absorbing shocks or bouncing forward. When imported into entrepreneurship these characteristics lead to a conceptualization of resilience as being enacted through a capability portfolio. A routine-based capability response is preferred when threats are familiar, simple, not severe and frequent, following minimal disorganization and where resource slack is available. In contrast, heuristics-based capabilities are preferred when threats are unfamiliar, complex, severe and infrequent, following serious disorganization and where resource slack is unavailable. An absorption threshold point identifies when organizations need to switch from routine-based to heuristics-based resilience capabilities.

Practical implications

Building resilience across a range of adverse situations requires firms to develop a portfolio of resilience capabilities. Firms must learn to match the capability required for the specific threat profile faced. This includes a mix of routinized responses for returning to stability but also more flexible, heuristics-based responses for strategic reconfiguration.

Originality/value

The paper undertakes a first of its kind cross-disciplinary conceptual analysis at the level of identifying competing assumptions about the nature of resilience. These assumptions are found to be somewhat unconscious among organization researchers, limiting the conceptual development of resilience in entrepreneurship. The authors contribute a theoretical framework based on explicit and robust assumptions, enabling the field to advance conceptually.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article

Imran Ali, Sev Nagalingam and Bruce Gurd

Most of the extant literature on resilience builds on normative, conceptual or silo approaches, thereby lacking an integrative approach to cold chain logistics risks…

Abstract

Purpose

Most of the extant literature on resilience builds on normative, conceptual or silo approaches, thereby lacking an integrative approach to cold chain logistics risks (CCLRs) and resilience. The purpose of this paper is to bridge the current research gap by developing a model, based on broad empirical evidence, of the interplay between CCLRs, resilience and firm performance (FP) in perishable product supply chains (PPSCs).

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed method approach is used with qualitative data from interviews and quantitative data from a survey across the supply chain. The analysis is framed by contingency theory and resource-based theory.

Findings

Four significant sources of CCLRs and six resources used to build resilience are identified. Then, supply chain resilience (SCR) as a moderator of the negative relationship between CCLRs and FP is corroborated.

Practical implications

The findings will help improve managerial understandings of critical sources of risks in cold chain logistics and resources indispensable to build resilience. The scope of the research is cold chain logistics for PPSCs, which has relevance to other cold supply chains as well.

Originality/value

While some theoretical frameworks suggest resilience being a moderator in the negative relationship between cold chain risks and a firm’s performance, this study empirically tests this relationship using the survey across the entire supply chain. A new empirically and theoretically driven definition of SCR is also developed.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Book part

C. Martínez, J. P. Paraskevas, C. Grimm, T. Corsi and S. Boyson

In the past decade, firms have become more aware of supply chain disruptions and their impact on the firm. Developing a supply chain resilience organizational culture has…

Abstract

In the past decade, firms have become more aware of supply chain disruptions and their impact on the firm. Developing a supply chain resilience organizational culture has been proposed as an effective way to manage supply chain risks. This study intends to explore how the geographical location risks impact the decision to develop a supply chain resilience strategy, in particular, to anticipate the disruption proactively and have a business continuity plan in place. Using a unique database including thousands of manufacturing locations that belong to over 7,000 firms across 102 countries, we test three hypotheses to understand if geographical location risks, frequency of disruptive events, and the region in which a site is located are factors for the likelihood of a firm having a business continuity plan at their locations. The study also seeks to understand if there are regional effects and firm effects affecting the decision to develop resilience. With a particular focus in Latin America and the firms with a manufacturing presence in that region. The main findings of the study are that natural disaster risks do tend to develop a culture of resilience, while macroeconomic risks tend to do the opposite. These results remain stable for firms' effects. The Latin America region shows no observable statistical difference in developing resilience compared to the Asia region. While the Northern America region shows more resilience compared to Asia. We conclude that economic risk is less predictable and harder to develop a plan for than disruptions, such as natural disasters. The findings of this study present an opportunity for governments to develop resilience plans that can make their countries more attractive for investment to multinational firms looking to establish new manufacturing locations around the world.

Details

Supply Chain Management and Logistics in Emerging Markets
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-333-3

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Article

Tony Wall and Lawrence Bellamy

The owner-manager of small firms is recognised as having a potentially significant role in the small firm’s competitiveness, growth and failure. However, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The owner-manager of small firms is recognised as having a potentially significant role in the small firm’s competitiveness, growth and failure. However, the owner-manager’s own resilience has been largely overlooked in the small firm resilience literature. The purpose of this paper is to redress this and expand the debate and empirical basis of small firm owner-managers’ personal resources for resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

This longitudinal qualitative study deployed semi-structured interviews with nine owner-managers, each being interviewed three or four times. Analytical procedures were used with an established framework, which conceptualised four key personal resources for resilience, as follows: adaptability, confidence, social support and purposefulness.

Findings

There were four key findings, as follows: owner-manager adaptability can appear in extremes including a sense of helplessness or optimism where disruptive circumstances are not sensed as problematic; owner-manager confidence levels often echo their own mindset of adaptability, that is, from helplessness to positive ambition; owner-managers can use discursive tactics with strong/weak ties for a range of affective and technical resources for resilience; and purposefulness tended to be framed in terms of a necessity for a longer term future state related to own or family lifestyle rather than profit. It is also noted that the owner-manager and the firm are closely interrelated, and therefore, enhancement of personal resilience resources is likely to positively influence their resilience, and therefore, the resilience of the organisation and strategic capability of the firm.

Originality/value

The small firm resilience literature typically focusses on the organisational level, which de-emphasises the salient role of the owner-manager and their resilience. This study attempts to redress this.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article

Mikaella Polyviou, Keely L. Croxton and A. Michael Knemeyer

The purpose of this paper is to explore resources or capabilities that enable medium-sized firms to be resilient, namely, to avoid and recover from supply chain disruptions.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore resources or capabilities that enable medium-sized firms to be resilient, namely, to avoid and recover from supply chain disruptions.

Design/methodology/approach

A case-study method is employed with four medium-sized manufacturing firms headquartered in the USA that have global supply chains. Data are collected from semi-structured interviews with key informants from diverse functions and managerial levels, archival documents, observation and a resilience assessment.

Findings

Internal social capital emerged as a resilience-enhancing resource, comprising: structural capital grounded in small network size, geographical proximity among decision makers and low hierarchy; relational capital grounded in close relationships, commitment and respect; and cognitive capital grounded in long employee tenure.

Originality/value

This is the first paper in the supply chain management literature to examine the resilience of medium-sized firms, an under-researched context. It is also the first paper to introduce internal social capital as a resilience-enhancing resource. Hence, this is among the few papers to propose a resilience-enhancing resource rooted not in a firm’s supply chain operations but its human resources. This paper, moreover, identifies several facets of internal social capital within medium-sized firms. Finally, the paper makes several managerial contributions.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article

David Asamoah, Benjamin Agyei-Owusu and Elizabeth Ashun

While the concept of supply chain resilience has received lots of scholarly and policy interest over the past few years, empirical research examining its sources and…

Abstract

Purpose

While the concept of supply chain resilience has received lots of scholarly and policy interest over the past few years, empirical research examining its sources and outcomes remains inadequate, particularly, in the context of small and medium enterprises (SMEs). Grounded in the resource-based view and social capital frameworks, the study examines the relationship between social network relationship, supply chain resilience and customer oriented performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study develops and empirically tests a research model that proposes social network relationships and customer-oriented performance as the antecedent and outcome respectively of supply chain resilience. Data was obtained from a survey of 110 SMEs in Ghana.

Findings

The findings of the study suggest that a firm's external and internal social networks can be leveraged to enhance its supply chain resilience and customer-oriented performance. Supply chain resilience was also found to enhance customer-oriented performance. Additionally, supply chain resilience was found to significantly mediate the effect of social network relationships on customer-oriented performance.

Originality/value

This is the first study that empirically explores and establishes the relationship between social network relationships, supply chain resilience and customer-oriented performance to the best of the authors’ knowledge.

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Article

Li Chunsheng, Christina W.Y. Wong, Ching-Chiao Yang, Kuo-Chung Shang and Taih-cherng Lirn

Building supply chain (SC) resilience is crucial for business continuity given the ever-changing environmental conditions. Based on the resource orchestration and…

Abstract

Purpose

Building supply chain (SC) resilience is crucial for business continuity given the ever-changing environmental conditions. Based on the resource orchestration and organizational culture theories, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the business value of SC resilience with the consideration of the roles of internal integration (II) and external integration (EI), risk management culture (RMC) and SC flexibility (SCF).

Design/methodology/approach

This study investigates how RMC, SCF and intra and interorganizational integration affect the performance of SC resilience. It collects primary and secondary data from 194 manufacturing firms listed in the Taiwan Stock Exchange and Taipei Exchange.

Findings

Results validate the authors’ hypothesis that RMC, SCF and II improve the financial performance of firms through SC resilience efforts.

Research limitations/implications

This study uses firms from Taiwan manufacturing industry, which might introduce country and industry bias.

Practical implications

This study helps managers improve the financial performance of their SC resilience efforts by developing RMC, SCF, II and IE across functions and partner firms.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by empirically testing the relationship between SC resilience and financial performance, and how the relationship is moderated by RMC, SCF, II and EI based on the theories of organizational culture and resource orchestration.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 50 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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