Search results

1 – 10 of over 12000
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2019

Devrimi Kaya and Andreas Seebeck

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the cross-country determinants of the extent of firm information disseminated via company register (CR) websites.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the cross-country determinants of the extent of firm information disseminated via company register (CR) websites.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop an index model (CR score) designed to capture the extent of regulated firm information disseminated via CR websites. The proposed index is applied to a unique sample of 137 countries. Following prior literature, the proposed index covers three dimensions: data availability, data accessibility and data serviceability. The index composition and the URLs of the CR websites are provided as an exhibit to this paper.

Findings

Across a variety of tests and sample compositions, the authors find consistent evidence that countries with a relatively high level of internet penetration, those that facilitate cross-border trading and those with higher governance quality show higher CR scores. The results are generally in line with theories of regulation.

Practical implications

The results of this paper speak directly to the current regulatory initiatives which aim to foster information acquisition and processing via company registers.

Originality/value

The authors provide early empirical evidence on the cross-country variation of dissemination of firm information via CR websites for a unique sample of 137 countries. Investors, analysts and other users of financial statements should be aware of the underlying factors that influence the extent and accessibility of firm information.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2020

Haili Zhang, Xiaotang Zhang and Michael Song

The purpose of this study is to develop a theoretical model for examining how innovation speed mediates the relationship between knowledge management (KM) and performance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop a theoretical model for examining how innovation speed mediates the relationship between knowledge management (KM) and performance and empirically tests the proposed model using data collected in the USA and China over three years.

Design/methodology/approach

To avoid common method bias and increase ability to draw causal effects of KM on performance, data were collected over three years. KM data were collected by survey; innovation speed data were collected in the following year; and sales growth and gross margin data were collected over the next three years. After merging the three data sets, the final empirical data used for this study contained data from 354 USA and 647 Chinese firms. Multiple regression analyses were used to test the research hypotheses. Sobel mediation tests were performed to test the mediating effects of innovation speed on the relationship between KM and performance.

Findings

Innovation speed has a U-shaped relationship with performance in both US and Chinese firms. Knowledge generation has an inverted U-shaped relationship with innovation speed in both US and Chinese firms. Knowledge dissemination increases innovation speed in US firms but not in Chinese firms. While knowledge application increases innovation speed in the US firms, it decreases innovation speed in Chinese firms.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to propose and empirically test the KM-innovation speed-performance relationship. This paper advances the KM literature by demonstrating that there is an inverted U-shaped relationship between knowledge generation and innovation speed and that there is a U-shaped relationship between innovation speed and performance. In addition, this study contributed to the cross-national study of KM.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2022

Christopher Agyapong Siaw, David Sugianto Lie and Rahul Govind

The purpose of this study is to examine how corporate communication of their social programs on their websites affects the ratings of those programs by independent rating…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine how corporate communication of their social programs on their websites affects the ratings of those programs by independent rating agencies. Firms expend resources on corporate social programs (CSPs) to promote their corporate social responsibility and sustainability credentials. Stakeholders, however, often respond to such “self-promotion” with skepticism because they believe that there are inconsistencies between corporate claims and actions. This research draws on attribution theory as a framework to examine how the perceived CSP performance of firms by uncontrollable sources are affected when firms disseminate CSP information on firm websites, i.e. a controllable source, where their claims may not be verifiable.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a two-step, mixed method study for the analysis using data from Fortune 500 companies. A qualitative content analysis process identifies the interfaces of CSP and their communications on firms’ website. The process allows the authors to collect CSP data systematically from firm websites and to identify relevant variables through the patterns that emerge from the analysis. The findings are used in a quantitative analysis to study how the patterns underlying CSP communication on their websites affect the ratings of firms’ CSP by independent rating agencies.

Findings

Results show that the location, the manner, the content and the scope of CSP information dissemination on firm websites, as well as perceived commitment to CSP identified on the website are important drivers of perceived CSP performance. A robustness check using an alternative independent rating of CSP also provides results that are supportive of the findings. In addition, the effects are found to differ by sector of operation, firm age and profitability.

Research limitations/implications

This research suggests that communication of CSPs at controllable sources of firm information dissemination can have a significant effect on the evaluation of CSP at uncontrollable sources when such communication facilitates the assessment of other information from a firm to determine the motive underlying a firm’s CSP.

Practical implications

The findings show that firms and managers can influence the perceived ratings, rankings or scores of their CSP by stakeholders when they put the right information at the right place on their corporate websites. One of the findings shows that even moderate levels of CSP commitment demonstrated on firm websites result in positive perceptions of CSP, which has marked practical implications.

Social implications

The findings show that integrating even a medium level of commitment to CSP increases the positive perceptions of a firm’s CSP. Thus, society benefits from the firm’s action without a substantial impact on the firm’s profits.

Originality/value

This research shows that firm-controlled sources of CSP information dissemination to stakeholders can affect uncontrollable sources of CSP information evaluation.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2010

Pilar Carbonell and Ana I. Rodríguez Escudero

It has been argued that innovation speed has been inappropriately absent in models of market orientation. The present study seeks to provide new insights into whether and…

4966

Abstract

Purpose

It has been argued that innovation speed has been inappropriately absent in models of market orientation. The present study seeks to provide new insights into whether and how market orientation's three main components: intelligence generation, intelligence dissemination, and responsiveness affect innovation speed and new product performance, and about the mediating role of innovation speed.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a sample of 247 firms in a variety of manufacturing industries. A mail survey was developed to collect the data.

Findings

The results indicate that intelligence generation has an indirect positive effect on innovation speed via intelligence dissemination and responsiveness. Intelligence dissemination influences innovation speed positively, both directly and indirectly through responsiveness. Findings report a curvilinear (J‐shaped) relationship between responsiveness and innovation speed. With regard to the effect of the market orientation's components on new product performance, the findings indicate a positive relationship between responsiveness and new product performance. The parameter estimates for the direct paths linking intelligence generation and intelligence dissemination with new product performance were found to be not significant. Instead, the findings show that intelligence generation and intelligence dissemination influence new product performance indirectly through responsiveness. Finally, a positive relationship was found between innovation speed and new product performance.

Originality/value

The research makes three important contributions to the marketing strategy and new product development literatures. First, by splitting market orientation into the components of intelligence generation, intelligence dissemination and responsiveness, the study provides a closer examination into the effect of market orientation on innovation speed and new product performance. Second, the results indicate that the effects of intelligence generation and intelligence dissemination on innovation speed and new product performance are mediated by responsiveness to market intelligence. Third, findings support the argument that innovation speed partially mediates the effect of market orientation's three main components on new product performance.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Alessandro Pagano, Elisa Carloni, Serena Galvani and Roberta Bocconcelli

This paper aims to provide a contribution on the diffusion of Industry 4 (I4.0)-related knowledge in industrial districts (IDs). The main goal is to examine the…

1106

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a contribution on the diffusion of Industry 4 (I4.0)-related knowledge in industrial districts (IDs). The main goal is to examine the dissemination of I4.0 knowledge, exploring the main mechanisms for its spreading and highlighting the main factors shaping such processes. Focus is on dissemination processes in IDs active in traditional industries, which could represent the “periphery” of I4.0 application context.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is qualitative. Notably, this paper presents a case study of the Pesaro ID specialized in furniture/woodworking machinery sector. A total of 18 in-depth one-to-one interviews have been conducted with relevant informants from a variety of organizations within the cluster: companies, institutions and universities.

Findings

The complexity of I4.0 requires a combination of traditional mechanisms with innovative ones within IDs characterized by the emergence of new players, activities and resources. These changes led to three main evolving patterns: the horizon of I4.0 upgrading shows blurred boundaries in terms of sectors and geographic location, the I4.0 diffusion appears fragmented in terms of initiatives and projects by both firms and institutions and the dissemination of I4.0 knowledge pushes ID firms and institutions to pursue deliberate initiatives leading to innovative forms of “collective” cooperation.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to both theory and practice. From the theoretical point of view, this paper contributes to the literature on innovation in IDs and clusters on two interrelated grounds. First, it provides further research on I4.0 and IDs and clusters. Second, it contributes to the stream of research on knowledge creation and diffusion in IDs and clusters, providing empirically based insights over emerging local learning processes in IDs. Moreover, relevant managerial and policy implications stem from the analysis.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal , vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2018

Amir Ashrafi and Ahad Zare Ravasan

Market orientation (MO) (intelligence generation, intelligence dissemination and responsiveness) is known as one of the key concepts in marketing literature. Although…

1074

Abstract

Purpose

Market orientation (MO) (intelligence generation, intelligence dissemination and responsiveness) is known as one of the key concepts in marketing literature. Although prior research has widely focused on the meaning and application of MO, few attempts have been made to explore how market-oriented firms lead to innovation and market performance and what factors actually moderate this relationship. To fill this gap, the present study aims to explore the relationship between MO, innovation and market performance. This study also attempts to examine the intervening role of IT infrastructure, business analytics (BA) capabilities and market turbulence in the proposed model.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, a questionnaire-based survey was undertaken to test the proposed hypotheses. To verify the proposed theoretical model, partial least squares (PLS)/structured equation modeling (SEM) was performed with 114 valid survey data.

Findings

Despite prior studies which postulated innovation performance as the final outcome of MO (Han et al., 1998; Song et al., 2015), this study focused on innovation performance as a mediating outcome which finally leads to market performance. The statistical results approve the putative relationship which means managers would be able to realize the paramount role of innovation as an integral part of achieving higher market performance. In addition, no support was found for the relationship between intelligence generation and responsiveness. This finding shows that not all obtained information can help managers in the decision-making process.

Originality/value

This study aims to enrich literature by developing a conceptual model to test the link between MO, innovation and market performance. The value of this study is to investigate the roles of flexible IT infrastructure, BA capabilities and market turbulence as the potential moderators in the proposed model. The results advance the understanding of the influence of BA capabilities on the link between intelligence dissemination and responsiveness. Findings also show innovation performance as remarkable and deemed valuable capability, leading to higher performance in marketing-related activities, particularly in highly turbulent markets.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2012

Henry F.L. Chung

The purpose of this study is to provide new insights into the link between export market orientation (EMO) and export performance by examining whether managerial ties act…

3352

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to provide new insights into the link between export market orientation (EMO) and export performance by examining whether managerial ties act to moderate the relationship. Specifically, the study explores whether the extent to which firms have managerial ties (business and political) alters the ways in which the intelligence generation and dissemination components of export market orientation drive export market responsiveness, and in turn, impact on strategic export performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data from 100 New Zealand firms exporting to the European Union are used.

Findings

The key findings indicate that: export market intelligence generation and dissemination have positive associations with responsiveness; the strength of business ties enhances the relationship between export market intelligence generation and responsiveness; the strength of political ties reduces the relationship between export market intelligence dissemination and responsiveness; and export market responsiveness is positively related to strategic export performance.

Originality/value

The study has implications for export marketing managers and researchers with respect to managing EMO levels and the development of managerial ties.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Hsiu‐Fen Lin

This study aims to develop a research model to examine the antecedents of three stages of electronic business (e‐business) diffusion (including e‐business initiation…

1123

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop a research model to examine the antecedents of three stages of electronic business (e‐business) diffusion (including e‐business initiation, implementation and assimilation). The research model features knowledge management (KM) capabilities (knowledge acquisition, knowledge storage, knowledge dissemination, and knowledge protection), and partnership attributes (partner interdependence, partner trust, and partner commitment) as prominent antecedents of stage‐based e‐business diffusion.

Design/methodology/approach

Data gathered from 398 firms were employed to test the relationships between the research model constructs using a structural equation modeling (SEM) approach.

Findings

The results reveal that the factors for KM capabilities and partnership attributes have different impacts on three stages of e‐business diffusion. In particular, knowledge dissemination has a positive effect on all three e‐business diffusion stages, demonstrating its importance in the decision to shape e‐business diffusion. Moreover, the findings show that three partnership attributes are important enablers during the whole e‐business diffusion process.

Practical implications

In the context of e‐business, knowledge dissemination activities occur not only within firms, but also between firms and their business partners. Knowledge dissemination enables employees to develop novel solutions to problems that significantly improve on current practices. Hence, the increasing importance of the field of knowledge dissemination is primarily attributed to promotion of successful e‐business activities and increased level of e‐business implementation.

Originality/value

Theoretically, this study aims to provide a research model that is capable of understanding the determinants of the stage‐based e‐business diffusion. From a managerial perspective, the findings of this study provide valuable guidelines to policy‐makers and practitioners in implementing e‐business and accelerating e‐business diffusion.

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2018

Henry F.L. Chung

Research focusing on the relation between market orientation and innovation in the Asian emerging economy is limited. The purpose of this study is to advance the extant…

Abstract

Purpose

Research focusing on the relation between market orientation and innovation in the Asian emerging economy is limited. The purpose of this study is to advance the extant literature by investigating the relations among market orientation, guanxi networking and innovation using the MARKOR scale.

Design/methodology/approach

The research conclusion is drawn based on the experience of 122 Asian emerging market firms operating in a wide variety of industrial sectors. This study explores whether the three MARKOR components (intelligence generation, dissemination and responsiveness) and their interaction with business and political guanxi have a significant effect on firms’ strategic innovation success. Innovation is measured following the practice of the OECD. In addition to the quantitative analyses, this study conducted qualitative interviews with executives of eight respondent firms, to further consolidate the subjects under investigation. The integration of both qualitative and quantitative data enriches the conclusions drawn from the study.

Findings

The findings of this study confirm that, when operating in an Asian emerging economy, both intelligence generation and responsiveness have a positive and direct impact on innovation. Though intelligence dissemination has no direct influence on innovation, its alignment with business and political guanxi still leads to a positive effect on innovation. The coalition of responsiveness and political guanxi, however, has a negative influence on innovation. The results of this study add new insights to the extant literature and provide implications for future research and marketing practices in Asian emerging economies.

Originality/value

The findings of this study confirm that, when operating in an Asian emerging economy, both intelligence generation and responsiveness have a positive and direct impact on innovation. Though intelligence dissemination has no direct influence on innovation, its alignment with business and political guanxi still leads to a positive effect on innovation. The coalition of responsiveness and political guanxi, however, has a negative influence on innovation. The results add new insights to the extant literature and provide implications for future research and marketing practices in Asian emerging economies.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Edward R. Bruning, Harry J. Turtle and Kevin Buhr

We examine the entry mode choice for Canadian firms entering the United States (U.S.). Entry options are categorized into three competing modes: mergers and acquisitions;…

Abstract

We examine the entry mode choice for Canadian firms entering the United States (U.S.). Entry options are categorized into three competing modes: mergers and acquisitions; joint ventures; and subsidiaries. The unit of analysis is the foreign direct investment (FDI) transaction between a Canadian firm and an American counterpart during the period from January 1980 through December 1989. Using canonical discriminant analysis, we develop a set of variables that characterize the entry mode choice. We find transaction specific information available to senior management provides important information regarding the entry mode choice. The importance of mergers and acquisitions is particularly apparent over this sample period. Empirical evidence strongly supports our measures of resource commitment, dissemination risk, and liquidity position as important measures determining mode of entry. Joint ventures display meaningful differences related to these measures in contrast to both mergers and acquisitions, and subsidiary investments.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 7 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

1 – 10 of over 12000